Archive for the ‘Graduate Teachers in Politics’ Category

Teaching is still priority, says union

Sunday, August 1st, 2010

THE move to allow graduate teachers to engage in politics should not be at the expense of students missing their daily lessons, the National Union of the Teaching Profession (NUTP) said today.

Its secretary-general Lok Yim Pheng said the union supported the move but certain things must be adhered to.

“Priority should be given to teaching and the education of their charges. Politics should be after that.”

She was commenting on the announcement by the Chief Secretary to the Government Tan Sri Mohd Sidek Hassan who said that graduate education service officers (teachers) on grades DG41 to DG48 would be permitted to engage in politics.

He said those who were allowed to be involved in politics must adhere fully to the Public Officers (Conduct and Discipline) Regulations 1993, and tight conditions would be imposed to ensure that the primary duties and focus of the group, which was to educate children, were not affected by their involvement in politics.

Lok said with the move, teachers’ voice on issues would be heard more at the political level and they should be given the opportunity to play a constructive role in politics.

BERNAMA.

Read more @ http://thestar.com.my/education/story.asp?file=%2F2010%2F8%2F1%2Feducation%2F6751367&sec=education

Teachers in politics

Friday, July 30th, 2010

THE move to allow graduate teachers to participate in politics has been met with a mixed response. As schools are for education, not for politics, and it would be unprofessional and unethical for those at the chalkface to use the schoolyard as a political barnstorm, the understandable concern is that these teachers cum politicians would not be able to leave their political hats at the school gate and behave as professionals in the classroom. Clearly, it’s legitimate to expect teachers not to be partisan or prejudiced, racist or sexist, unfair or unjust.

As a general rule, civil servants must refrain from any activity which is likely to interfere with the impartial discharge of their duties or which could give rise to the impression of bias in the eyes of the public. Indeed, in line with the ethos of political neutrality, regardless of changes in the legislative branch of government, the public rightly expects those working in the civil branches of government to offer objective advice to the elected leaders and conscientiously implement their policies.

However, this is an argument for strictly excluding the bureaucratic branch from partisan political activities rather than a blanket ban on the entire body of those employed in the civil service. Certainly, the statutory intent of Regulation 21 of the Public Officers (Conduct and Discipline) Regulations 1993 was to ensure political impartiality and prevent divided loyalties and prejudiced service. However, the principle seems to have been to impose political restrictions on those in the higher levels of the hierarchy who could influence policy and affect implementation but to exempt those in the clerical grades and support staff who carry out the routine work as directed by the higher-level administrators.

NST Editorial.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/nst/articles/Teachersinpolitics/Article/

Schoolchildren come first, says NUTP

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

KUALA LUMPUR: The move to allow graduate teachers to engage in politics should not be at the expense of schoolchildren’s education, the National Union of the Teaching Profession (NUTP) said yesterday.

Its general secretary, Lok Yim Pheng, said the union supported the move but certain limitations must be adhered to.

“Priority should be given to the children’s education. Politics should come second.” She said this when asked to comment on the announcement by the Chief Secretary to the Government Tan Sri Mohd Sidek Hassan that beginning Aug 1, graduate education service officers (teachers) from Grades DG41 to DG48 would be permitted to engage in politics.

In Shah Alam, Menteri Besar Tan Sri Abdul Khalid Ibrahim said although certain teachers would be allowed to engage in politics, they should not spend too much time on it.

Teachers should be impartial in their views and avoid a conflict of interest, he said.

Bernama

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/nst/articles/8nutp/Article

Need for guideline on teaching and political work.

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

KUALA LUMPUR: Datuk Khamsyiah Yeop said her 25 years of teaching experience had enabled her to adjust comfortably to her role as the Kemering assemblywoman in 1995.

“Teachers were well respected and seen as community leaders, especially in rural areas. People looked to us for advice, views and guidance.

“Political parties were also keen to recruit teachers as members,” said Khamsyiah, 66, who had, among others, served as a teacher in Sekolah Menengah Datuk Haji Hussein, Selama, and Sekolah Menengah Sultan Idris Shah, Grik, both rural areas.

Khamsiyah, who was the deputy entrepreneurship and cooperatives minister from 2004 to 2008, said Umno politics back then featured a lot of teachers who eventually quit their position to become full-time politicians.

She said teachers were then active in social and community activities and saw politics as a platform to further their cause.

Khamsyiah added that as teachers were dedicated to the teaching ethics, they brought those values with them when they became politicians.

by Sajahan Waheedand Shuhada Elis.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/nst/articles/8kamh/Article

Graduate teachers can now go into politics

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

KUALA LUMPUR: Beginning Aug 1, graduate education service officers (teachers) on grades DG41 to DG48 will be permitted to engage in politics, Chief Secretary to the Government Tan Sri Mohd Sidek Hassan announced yesterday.

He said the move was based on the fact that teachers, at one time, played an important role as community leaders in the country’s political landscape.

“The time has come for them to be active again in politics.”

For this purpose, he said, Yang di-Pertuan Agong Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin had consented to an amendment to Regulation 21 of the Public Officers (Conduct and Discipline) Regulations 1993. Action was being taken to gazette the amendment to the regulation, he added.

Regulation 21(2) now states that only officers in the support group can contest or hold any position or be appointed to any post in any political party, on the condition that they obtain prior written approval from the director-general of the Public Service Department or the secretary-general of the relevant ministry.

Under the amendment, education officers, other than principals or headmasters and officers holding any administrative post in any government agency, have to obtain prior written approval from the secretary-general of the Education Ministry.

“The secretary-general of the Education Ministry cannot delegate his authority to give the written approval to anyone, and any decision of the secretary-general of the Education Ministry is final,” said Sidek.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/nst/articles/8gulu/Article