Archive for the ‘History, a core subject.’ Category

Relics from Majapahit kingdom found beneath Malacca river

Sunday, November 6th, 2016

MALACCA: Relics possibly dating back to the 13th-century Majapahit empire are believed to have been found along a 2km stretch beneath the Malacca river.

Two weeks ago, a group of professional divers apparently discovered parts of a Hindu temple and a fort-like structure.

They believed that these ancient finds could point to a submerged city that existed even before Parameswara founded Malacca in 1400.

Chief Minister Datuk Seri Idris Haron, when contacted, acknowledged that he had received a report about the sighting of the relics.

“But we have yet to get an in-depth report.

“The finding is still vague until archaeologists from the Heritage Department make their conclusions,” he said.

The Majapahit Empire was centralised in east Java and was a vast archipelagic kingdom during its peak between 1293 to 1527.

Malacca was once an important town for Majapahit’s palace officials and soldiers who made the town their maritime headquarters.

In February last year, The Star reported that relics discovered in Pulau Nangka were reportedly from the Majapahit era.

Two relics found on the island by a salvaging firm featured characters and symbols that indicated that they could date back to the Majapahit kingdom.

When contacted yesterday, Malacca Museum Corporation’s general manager Datuk Khamis Abas said that relics linked to the Majapahit age had been salvaged from the river since the late 1990s.

“Some of these relics have been displayed at a museum,” he said.

History buff Mohd Fuad Khusari M. Said said he researched claims of an underwater city and found there was a temple and structures resembling a fort.

“The underwater city stretches from the bridge close to Hard Rock Cafe in Malacca to Kampung Morten.

“This underwater city is about 20m from the river surface.

“The statues and various structures are still intact,” he claimed.

by R.S.N.MURALI and SARDI MAHORM.

Read more @ http://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2016/11/06/relics-from-majapahit-kingdom-found-beneath-malacca-river-exclusive/

Old Kedah Civilisation Should Be Included In History Text Books

Wednesday, July 6th, 2016

ALOR SETAR, July 5 (Bernama) — New facts on Old Kedah, which has been declared as the earliest and oldest civilisation in Southeast Asia should be immediately included in history books used as text books in schools.

Kedah branch Malaysian Historical Society chairman Prof Datuk Dr Wan Shamsuddin Mohd Yusof said the information was necessary to make the young generation aware of the existence of the more than 2,000 year-old treasure at the Sungai Batu Archaeology Complex.

“This is history, not a myth, or merely a legend, but something that should be the pride of Malaysians, that we have the oldest civilisation in Southeast Asia,” he told Bernama.

Last May 23, the Sungai Batu Archaeology Complex was declared the earliest and oldest civilisation in this region and five archaeologists, representing five main civilisations in the world, namely Mesopotamia, Indus, Mesoamerica, China and Greek-Rome, signed the declaration plaque.

The historical event was symbolised with the handing over of the declaration plaque by an archaeological expert from the University of Oxford, Professor Dr Stephen Oppenheimer, to the Director of the Global Archaeological Research Centre at Universiti Sains Malaysia, Professor Datuk Dr Mokhtar Saidin.

Coordinator of the Old Kedah Search Programme, Nur Dini Mohd Noh also opined that the inclusion of the new facts on Old Kedah in the school history text books was crucial to provide better understanding to the society on the matter.

“It has to be mentioned that Old Kedah does not belong to Kedah, but the country. Hence, information has to be disseminated that civilisation ownership does not belong to the state. It is owned by the country,” she added.

BERNAMA.

by  Hasnah Jusid.

Read more @ http://education.bernama.com/index.php?sid=news_content&id=1261166

‘History textbooks must reflect contributions of all races’

Thursday, September 17th, 2015

KUCHING: History textbooks must be changed to include the contributions of other races in the formation of Malaysia and its development.

Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Tan Sri Adenan Satem pointed out that the content of current History textbooks tended to concentrate on the history of the Malay community and Peninsular Malaysia.

“What about other important figures from Sabah and Sarawak who have made enormous contributions to the formation of Malaysia?” he asked during TV3’s ‘Question and Answer’ programme on Wednesday.

Adenan was elaborating on Sarawak’s demand for more autonomy in administration, especially in educational matters.

“Don’t forget about Abdul Rahman (Yakub), Sarawak independence heroes Tun Temenggong Jugah anak Barieng, Datuk Stephen Kalong Ningkan, the late Mustapha Datu Harun, and Tun Mohd Fuad Stephen,” he shared.

“There were also other races who have sacrificed to defend this country. They play important roles in the development of our country as well.”

Adenan emphasised the need to ensure stability within the teaching force with more local teachers serving throughout Sarawak.

He observed that Muslim teachers from states like Kelantan and Terengganu were often posted to non-Muslim-majority areas in Sarawak, where they have a low understanding of the needs of locals.

“This brings various problems and the local people are not satisfied. In the end, they want to go back,” he pointed out.

In addition, Adenan highlighted that education policies need to be more consistent with emphasis given to the English language besides Bahasa Malaysia.

“The English language cannot be sidelined because it is a universal language widely used in engineering, science and technology and so forth. We can lift up both English and Bahasa Malaysia.

“More importantly, we do not want our education policies to flip-flop every time a new education minister takes over. It is hard for people to cope with all these confusing changes,” he said, highlighting the short-lived implementation of teaching Science and Mathematics in English.

The devolution of power from federal to the state, he reiterated, is important to facilitate and expedite decision-making and prevent the overlapping of functions between government departments and agencies.

“For instance, Sarawak has JKR (Public Works Department) which is capable of implementing any project. So why does it have to be done by the central government?

“And on the distribution and deciding of projects, sometimes, we don’t even know there are projects from Kuala Lumpur being implemented in Sarawak,” he said.

Adenan highlighted the example of mini hydro projects.

“They don’t even understand and thought Sarawak has rain all year long. When the project was done, there was no water and in the end, the project was abandoned, losing millions of ringgit,” he said.
Read more @ http://www.theborneopost.com/2015/09/17/history-textbooks-must-reflect-contributions-of-all-races/#ixzz3m01391×2

Make History A Compulsory Subject In Preschool – Arshad Ayub

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

PUTRAJAYA, Aug 14 (Bernama) — The country’s history must become a compulsory subject at the preschool level so that the younger generation understand how it was formed and the strength of the Malaysian Social Contract in ensuring peace in the country, said Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Pro Chancellor Tan Sri Arshad Ayub.

Arshad, who was the first Institut Teknologi MARA (ITM) director, said this was the only way Malaysia can produce citizens who truly love the country and maintain unity that has been established over 50 years ago.

“History needs to be taught in preschool to instill love for the country and teach them about the sacrifices made by our leaders to form the nation.

“Each Malaysian need to understand the national constitution, social contract, racial sensitivities not just during Independence month,” he told reporters after a leadership forum organised by the Razak School of Government, here Thursday.

He said actions like insult, curse or criticise a race or question sensitive issues such as the Sultan’s sovereignty in the social media will have negative consequences to the country.

As a multi-racial country, he said each person has a role and responsibility to defend and promote peace.

“Educational institutions need to play a role in this matter, to produce a generation that can think and help develop the country instead of just supporting a political party,” he said.

He also urged youths to take advantage of opportunities provided by the government to empower themselves with knowledge which is the basis for success.

BERNAMA.

Read more @ http://education.bernama.com/index.php?sid=news_content&id=1060366

Archives Breathing Life Into Boring History Lessons

Sunday, August 3rd, 2014

KUALA LUMPUR:  Ameerah Mansor finds history the most boring subject in school, and there is little one can do to convince her otherwise.

If you ask her why, the Form Four student is quick to respond: “There are too many facts to memorise. It is simply a difficult subject.”

Ameerah, a student of SMK Zainab (1) in Kelantan, does realise the importance of the subject in cultivating love for the nation and instilling a sense of patriotism.

Yet, she still cannot help but to perceive history being nothing more than a subject at school that she has to pass.

So she dutifully memorised each fact and regurgitated them during her PMR examination last year. She got an A in history.

But if you ask her today any of those questions from her history syllabus, the ones she had mastered, you’ll draw a blank.

“I’m afraid I’ve forgotten it all,” she replied simply.

Make History Compulsory

Sadly, Ameerah’s story is not a unique one. Many other students have the same attitude towards the subject. Students often find history lessons banal and uninspiring.

In fact, it is not uncommon for students to ace the subject but forget all that they learned soon after. This has been the subject of discussion by many prominent figures, including national historian Prof Emeritus Tan Sri Dr Khoo Kay Kim.

What is even sadder is that today, many students even question the need to study the subject.

They admitted that if the subject was an elective one, they would not hesitate to give it a miss.

The government, wary of the scenario, is reviewing the subject’s curriculum. It is revising a new secondary school syllabus for the subject, hoping to breathe new life into it.

This is also in line with the government’s wish to make history a subject compulsory to pass in the SPM examination from this year onwards.

Be More Creative

The way history is taught is key to making the subject more interesting. Therefore, teachers need to employ more creativity when teaching the subject.

They could no longer rely entirely on textbooks and confine the lessons to the classrooms, Khoo was quoted as saying.

“Students say history is the most hated subject because one need to memorise the subject to pass. How is that possible?” he was quoted as saying in a news report.

He was also worried at the decline in the number of students enrolling at the University of Malaya’s History Department. There was a marked decrease in students’ number this year, compared with 1,300 who enrolled last year.

The Deputy Education Minister II P. Kamalanathan agreed with Khoo. In a report, he was quoted as saying that a practical learning medium may increase students’ understanding and appreciation on the subject of history.

Therefore, there is a need to take the classrooms to the museums, where the nation’s most valuable historical records are kept.

A class trip to the National Archives of Malaysia is also another way to liven up a lesson on the nation’s history.

Open to all.


Azemi Abdul Aziz, the Planning and Management Deputy Director-General of the National Archives said while there were many students and teachers who visited the National Archives in search of references, it has yet to become culture in doing so.

The reason perhaps has much to do with poor understanding of the wealth of knowledge that the National Archives has to offer.

Aini Raihan, a former student of Sekolah Menengah Kebangsaan Sultan Ismail, Kelantan told Bernama: “I have known of the existence of the National Archives, but have always thought it catered exclusively to university students, writers and researchers. I had no idea it was also open to school children.”

by Sakini Mohd Said.

BERNAMA.

Read more @ http://education.bernama.com/index.php?sid=exclusive_content&id=987563

Giving History its worth

Saturday, March 15th, 2014

IN view of changes to the curriculum, History was made a “must pass” subject in the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) as of last year, but students generally regard History with some misgivings.

It is seen as a dull subject and most don’t see the importance of significant events.

In fact it is for these negative perceptions of the subject that the Government in the Malaysia Education Blueprint 2013-2025 is trying to instil love and values of patriotism among the school-going population.

Academicians and historians hope that changes in the education system can help develop and strengthen the national identity of young Malaysians.

History provides identity. History is also about good and responsible citizenship and teaches us how to learn from the mistake of others.

However, the question is how effective History is in cultivating and understanding change and societal development.

Malaysian Historical Society executive committee chairman Tan Sri Omar Mohd Hashim said at a recent History summit in Kuala Lumpur that the identity crisis that existed among the people in so many countries was due to their lack of understanding of who they were.

He attributed this to one of the downsides of a borderless world which made youth easily susceptible to change and ideas that gnaw at their loyalty to their nation.

Research from across the globe even showed that citizens in many nations did not know much about the history of their country and how it all started, he added.

This is perhaps the foremost reason why many countries, including Malaysia, have started giving History prominence in the curriculum.

The formulation of public policies, particularly those addressing national identity issues, help strengthen unity among its people.

Asian nations like South Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, China and Singapore have been at the forefront of such change, setting a progressive pace for History education.

Sharpening skills

Omar said that many countries had started with a transformative curriculum that enabled history lessons to become the platform of sharpening thinking skills.

The Education Ministry’s approach and orientation of the History curriculum should also be given precedence, said Omar.

Focus should be given to the efforts of improving the efficacy of History lessons in school through its curriculum, teachers’ professionalism and a more active and creative learning style.

Read more @ http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Education/2014/03/09/Giving-History-its-worth/

Compulsory pass for History not meant to burden students, says Idris Jusoh.

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

KUALA LUMPUR: The government’s move in making History a compulsory subject to pass in the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) examination from this year onwards is not to burden students, but to increase their knowledge on the country’s history.

Second Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh said it was an effort toward teaching students to become good citizens.

“It is not our intention to fail them; we certainly intend to pass them but at least let them know the basic history of our country.

“We see that when it (History) is not made a compulsory-pass, many treat the subject as unimportant and they don’t even want to know our history, what happened in the past and will not appreciate what we have now,” he said.

He was speaking to reporters after visiting the first session of SPM examinations, which begins today until Dec 6, at Sekolah Menengah Kebangsaan Puteri Wilayah here.

In 2010, Deputy Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin announced that History would be a compulsory subject to pass for SPM starting 2013.

Muhyiddin, who is also Education Minister, said the move was the same as making Bahasa Malaysia a prerequisite to obtain the SPM certificate.

Archives Breathing Life Into Boring History Lessons

Saturday, October 26th, 2013

KUALA LUMPUR: — Ameerah Mansor finds history the most boring subject in school, and there is little one can do to convince her otherwise.

If you ask her why, the Form Four student is quick to respond: “There are too many facts to memorise. It is simply a difficult subject.”

Ameerah, a student of SMK Zainab (1) in Kelantan, does realise the importance of the subject in cultivating love for the nation and instilling a sense of patriotism.

Yet, she still cannot help but to perceive history being nothing more than a subject at school that she has to pass.

So she dutifully memorised each fact and regurgitated them during her PMR examination last year. She got an A in history.

But if you ask her today any of those questions from her history syllabus, the ones she had mastered, you’ll draw a blank.

“I’m afraid I’ve forgotten it all,” she replied simply.

Make History Compulsory:

Sadly, Ameerah’s story is not a unique one. Many other students have the same attitude towards the subject. Students often find history lessons banal and uninspiring.

In fact, it is not uncommon for students to ace the subject but forget all that they learned soon after. This has been the subject of discussion by many prominent figures, including national historian Prof Emeritus Tan Sri Dr Khoo Kay Kim.

What is even sadder is that today, many students even question the need to study the subject.

They admitted that if the subject was an elective one, they would not hesitate to give it a miss.

The government, wary of the scenario, is reviewing the subject’s curriculum. It is revising a new secondary school syllabus for the subject, hoping to breathe new life into it.

This is also in line with the government’s wish to make history a subject compulsory to pass in the SPM examination from this year onwards.
Be More Creative:

The way history is taught is key to making the subject more interesting. Therefore, teachers need to employ more creativity when teaching the subject.

They could no longer rely entirely on textbooks and confine the lessons to the classrooms, Khoo was quoted as saying.

by Sakini Mohd Said.

BERNAMA.

Read more@ http://education.bernama.com/index.php?sid=exclusive_content&id=987563

History a must pass for SPM students this year

Friday, October 4th, 2013

Kota Kinabalu: All students who would be taking the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) examination this year are advised to start researching for answers to the History Paper 3 question which is already made available at the Education Ministry’s website since September.

“I would like to remind this, especially to private candidates, that starting this year, History is a must-pass subject. If prior to this, you only have to pass Malay language to get the certificate, this year, you must pass History to be eligible to get it.

In addition to this, History Paper 3, code number 1249/3 is also introduced for the first time.

Prior to this, there were only two papers for History; History 1 (objective) and History 2 (subjective),” said Director of State Education Department, Jame Alip during a press conference here on Tuesday.

Jame explained that History Paper 3 is an open-book examination with the theme given to all candidates six weeks prior to the SPM examination. This year’s SPM examination starts on Nov 14.

“Candidates are allowed to bring as many books as they want. Books, notes, printed materials, into the examination hall, as long as the use of these materials does not disturb other candidates. So what if you decide to bring ten textbooks.

This is an open book examination and they are given three hours to answer the question,” he said.

Candidates are allowed to discuss the question with anybody including their friends and teachers and could research for the information on Internet, printed materials, books, newspapers or any related sources.

Read more @ http://www.dailyexpress.com.my/news.cfm?NewsID=86796

A showcase of the Tunku’s photos

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

Pictures of the Prince: Tunku Amat Nerang looks at some of the photos of his father.

Pictures of the Prince: Tunku Amat Nerang looks at some of the photos of his father.

ROBERT Lim thinks that it is important for the younger generation to know and appreciate the country’s history.

“Without this appreciation, they won’t be able to understand what we went through to achieve the unity we have now.

“And to me, Tunku Abdul Rahman is a strong symbol of unity and peace,” said the owner of Canvas Art Gallery.

This sentiment has prompted Lim to hold numerous photography exhibitions on Malaysia’s first premier the most recent of which was one titled “Tunku: Prince of Peace” held at the Bangsar Shopping Centre (BSC).

Held in conjunction with Malaysia Day, the week-long exhibition featured some 230 photographs of the country’s first premier dating back to the 1940’s.

Lim added that the pictures will be handed over the Malaysian Historical Society, saying that they would now be “responsible to continue showcasing the collection to the public”.

The society’s Kuala Lumpur branch president Abdullah Mad Yunus said that it was an honour to be given the collection.

Read more @ http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Education/2013/09/22/A-showcase-of-the-Tunkus-photos.aspx