Archive for the ‘Industry Revolution 4.0 (IR 4.0)’ Category

Learning mustn’t stop with Covid-19

Sunday, March 29th, 2020

Designed modern workspace with white desktop computer

The Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR4.0) brings technology into our everyday lives, making education accessible anytime, anywhere.

THE Covid-19 pandemic has pushed schools, higher education institutions (HEIs) and training providers online to ensure that effective learning continues. While technology can facilitate seamless migration of face-to-face learning to a virtual platform, accessibility to quality digital content is crucial especially during the movement control order (MCO).

Schools

Interest in SMK Jerlun science teacher Norhailmi Abdul Mutalib’s free online content has seen a surge since the MCO was imposed on March 18.

His blog which has been running since 2012, provides science and educational information for teachers and students.

“I get some 10,000 daily views but it has spiked to 35,000. Articles on online quizzes, science experiments and topic notes, which students can use to study at home, are popular.”

The Global Teacher Prize 2020 top 50 finalist, whose teaching methods include enabling students to produce creative online content through blogs and videos, also shares his science content on YouTube.

“Views on my channel increased by 127% in the last few days – especially the science experiment videos. I usually get 10 to 15 subscribers daily but since the MCO, I’m seeing 50 to 100 sign ups every day, ” he said, adding that viewer engagement time has also gone up from 2,000 to 7,000 minutes.

To make sure that learning is not disrupted, he keeps in touch with his students through phone and video calls, and social media.

Advising parents to follow the Education Ministry’s social media page and credible education portals and blogs for updates and useful content, he reminds students to keep in constant contact with their teachers and peers through group chats, and to complete their online homework and activities in a timely manner.

“Collaborate with each other and share your e-learning resources.”

Higher education

Many varsities have moved their classes online to minimise the spread of infection, said Universiti Malaya’s Academic Enhancement and Leadership Development Centre (ADeC) e-learning head Dr Zahiruddin Fitri Abu Hassan.

To ensure limited interruption to teaching and learning activities, HEIs must make sure the remote approaches are effective for students.

Those who have never designed an online interaction before can start with virtual lectures to minimise anxiety, he suggested.

“There are plenty of online meeting applications you can use (see info-graphics). Your IT department may have an institutional account that you could borrow.”

Most of these applications, he said, allow for simultaneous connections and screen sharing so educators can browse through their lecture slides like they would normally do in class.

“Lecturers can share the meeting link from the application with their students in the varsity’s learning management system (LMS) page together with instructions of when to connect for the online lecture. The laptop camera and microphone are good enough for this.”

Online learning, he said, should include assessment activities.

“Talk to your students. The move to online teaching especially if it has not been done before, might be unsettling to some, ” he said, adding that attendance can be taken through a screen capture by recording the online lecture.

The assessment submission time stamp and chat or forum logs can be used as a participation record for other online learning activities. These can even be printed out, he said.

“When using chats or forums, students must be told that their ‘attendance’ is being taken.”

To measure student learning time, the lecturer must identify ‘measurable activities’ that students have to do online.

The time for students to read articles, watch videos, go through lecture slides, create content, write reflections and answer assessments, can be estimated.

The LMS, he said, can be used as an indexing portal to design a step-by-step learning experience while its activity modules can be used together with articles, journal papers, e-books, YouTube videos, online collaborative tools and web 2.0 applications, to achieve learning objectives.

“Practice makes perfect. In some varsities, regular e-learning activities are conducted so educators would have had plenty of time to fine tune their online teaching practice and test the e-learning system.

“For others, it helps to be in constant communication with the teaching and learning centre and IT department.”

The MCO, said Malaysian Association of Private Colleges and Universities (Mapcu) president Datuk Dr Parmjit Singh, is a bold and responsible step in safeguarding the community from exposure to the virus.

All academicians and institutions are now challenged with minimising the impact on students, he said, adding that Mapcu members have adopted different remote learning approaches to ensure continuity to the teaching and learning process.

For example, educators who previously used ‘flipped classrooms’ to enhance collaborative learning in physical classrooms, have turned to technology to implement ‘flipped virtual classrooms’ instead. This ensures that the same level of learning effectiveness is achieved whether or not the lecturer and students are in the same physical space.

Some institutions have also implemented synchronous learning, effectively conducting ‘live sessions’ with their students online. These are recorded and made available to students who weren’t able to join the session.

“Others deliver sessions purely in asynchronous mode, with recorded sessions viewed by students in their own time, followed by shorter engagement sessions like chatroom and online meetings where the recorded material is discussed.

“A variety of approaches enables e-learning to operate regardless of the availability of strong Internet connectivity, ” he said, adding that most HEIs have well-developed frameworks, tools, support facilities and infrastructure to handle both synchronous and asynchronous learning.

These, he said, have been developed and enhanced continuously alongside advancements in learning technologies.

“Although Covid-19 has put us in an unfortunate situation, the MCO is a golden opportunity for HEIs to test all their remote learning approaches and to give students the full experience of technology-supported learning.”

Students, he said, should also be able to access the library via e-books, online databases, journals and open access resources.

Taylor’s University and Taylor’s College have implemented their Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) since Monday.

Classes – including orientation for the new students – will be conducted virtually until April 19.

Taylor’s deputy vice-chancellor and chief academic officer Prof Dr Pradeep Nair said students’ educational progress won’t be hindered during this period as they can easily access the VLE.

“Each Taylor’s course has its own virtual site with e-assessment, e-tutoring, e-submission and e-forum features which lets students learn outside the classroom.

“It also allows them to connect with their lecturers, collaborate with their peers and take charge of their learning.

“Students’ progress is tracked by using a progress bar. Digital badges are awarded when students complete all the required activities online, ” he said, adding that students also have access to the Lecture Capture System (ReWIND) which has over 5,000 recorded lectures – complete with audio, visual, presentation slides, and other module-related content.

Students can fast-forward, rewind, or skip to a specific segment, to learn in a self-directed and personalised manner, anytime, anywhere.

Taylor’s also uses live streaming on YouTube in University Compulsory Modules (UCM) and Lightboard Video Technology for recording lectures.

Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), said its vice-chancellor Prof Datuk Dr Aini Ideris, started conducting online lectures last month.

That was put on hold when the MCO was announced, as students in rural areas were facing Internet access issues. UPM, she said, is in the midst of identifying the students involved and their Internet speeds.

“We’ll have online lectures in real time which requires high bandwith, and also versions that are suitable for lower bandwith, ” she said, adding that the varsity was also ready to carry out online assessment for its students.

“We’ll face this challenge positively. Covid-19 is a push factor for us to ensure that learning and assessment in the new millennium is carried out effectively.”

Urging the Education and Higher Education Ministries to support, strengthen, and expand online learning, HELP vice-chancellor Prof Datuk Dr Paul Chan said this would ensure that students’ study routine and discipline are not compromised.

Without online learning, students may end up playing video games, watching TV or idling at home.

“Most importantly, they lose the discipline of learning in a structured way.

“They don’t know what to do and parents may not be around to help them, ” he said, adding that all schools and colleges should be encouraged to implement e-learning as most students have hand phones and Internet access.

“E-learning is part of IR4.0. If the MCO goes on for months, those who already have access to online education will learn but those without are at a further disadvantage.

“It’s better to accelerate e-learning in all colleges and schools rather than to stop it, ” he said.

Telcos, he added, should also be encouraged to support a national online education effort by lowering cost for students.

He also suggested television networks broadcast learning content so that poor and rural students who may not have access to the Internet can watch and learn from the broadcast.

Lifelong learning

Nellie Wartoft, of Tigerhall – a Singapore-based knowledge-sharing platform which provides digital learning content – said many HEIs and corporations have gone digital.

But despite what’s going on, learning cannot stop. Individuals today have to learn more than ever before to keep up with these rapid changes and global challenges, said the CEO.

Learning and development departments in corporations across the region are shifting to virtual sessions that can be scaled digitally.

“There are plenty of digital alternatives we can tap into, including mobile applications, cloud-based platforms and video conferencing. HEIs stand to gain significantly.

“For example, a lot of varsities fly guest lecturers in from different continents. Plenty of resources go into making such arrangements, when in reality these lectures are just as effective when conducted virtually. They can also be scaled to include more people, ” she said, adding that in addition to cost-savings, an effective virtual learning programme consolidates training content so that students can access a particular session as many times as they want, making it easier to remember the crucial takeaways.

The Covid-19 pandemic will be a catalyst in moving the world towards the digital future, she opined.

“It will definitely help educational institutions and organisations shift to virtual learning and digital education sooner, helping more people get ahead by making knowledge more accessible to everyone.”

THE Higher Education Ministry has announced that all HEIs in the country can continue e-learning teaching and learning activities – provided all students have access to the Internet, lecturers and infrastructures.

“We don’t want any students to be left behind due to their lack of access to the Internet. We take note of the level of readiness of some HEIs in terms of their infrastructure, lecturers, and online teaching and learning programme with Open and Distance Learning license, ” it said in a statement on March 20.

It reminded HEIs that face-to-face teaching and learning aren’t allowed.

The ministry had earlier suspended all teaching and learning activities, including e-learning and online tests, student development activities and research, from March 18 to 31, to avoid the spread of Covid-19. The move led to an outcry among institutions, students and parents, who were worried that learning would be disrupted.

By CHRISTINA CHIN.

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2020/03/29/learning-mustnt-stop-with-covid-19

The future through Artificial Intelligence

Saturday, March 28th, 2020

ARTIFICIAL Intelligence (AI) is the wave of the future. This area of computer science emphasising the creation of intelligent machines that work and react like humans is heavily influencing and taking over the way we get on with daily life.

Artificial Intelligence is revolutionising industries and improving the way business is conducted.Artificial Intelligence is revolutionising industries and improving the way business is conducted.

More importantly, it is revolutionising industries and improving the way business is done, being already widely used in applications including automation, data analytics and natural language processing.

On a bigger spectrum, from self-driving cars to voice-initiated mobile phones and computer-controlled robots, the presence of AI is seen and felt almost everywhere.

As more industries shift towards embracing the science of incorporating human intelligence in machines so the latter can function, think and work like humans, the demand for human capital with the relevant skill and expertise correspondingly increases.

As such, the question is, how do engineering students ride this wave and make the most of it?

AI has a high learning curve but the rewards of a career in AI far outweigh the investment of time and energy.

Unlike most conventional careers, AI is still in its infancy stage although several modern nations have fully embraced the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Taking this into account, UCSI University has taken the initiative to develop the Bachelor of Computer Engineering (Artificial Intelligence) programme.

The nation’s best private university for two years in a row, according to the two recent QS World University Rankings exercises, proactively defines its own AI curriculum to offer educational content that can help increase the supply of AI engineers with job-ready graduates and real world experiences.

The AI programme at UCSI consists of a number of specialisations and several overlapping disciplines, including mathematical and statistical methods, computer sciences and other AI core subjects to provide a conceptual framework in providing solutions for real-world engineering problems.

The first two years covers core theoretical knowledge such as mathematics and statistics, algorithm design and computer programming, as well as electrical and electronics.

Students will progress to the AI subfields by selecting the specialisation elective tracks covering emerging areas such as machine learning, decision-making and robotics, perception and language and human-AI interaction, among others.

‘We aim to nurture the new generation workforce with the right skills set and knowledge on smart technologies to accelerate Malaysia’s transformation into a smart and modern manufacturing system, ’ says Ang.‘We aim to nurture the new generation workforce with the right skills set and knowledge on smart technologies to accelerate Malaysia’s transformation into a smart and modern manufacturing system, ’ says Ang.

UCSI Faculty of Engineering, Technology and Built Environment dean Asst Prof Ts Dr Ang Chun Kit pointed out that AI was “unavoidably” the way forward.

“We aim to nurture the new generation workforce with the right skills set and knowledge on smart technologies to accelerate Malaysia’s transformation into a smart and modern manufacturing system.

“This programme was developed with a vision to provide the foundation for future growth in producing more complex and high-value products for industry sectors in Malaysia, ” he said.

Leading the faculty in which 46 of its members have PhDs, Ang emphasised the university focuses on research attachment abroad and has established partnerships with key industry players.

The faculty also stands out in terms of receiving grants to advance high impact projects.

Students from the faculty are also annually selected for researches at world-renowned universities such as Imperial College London and Tsinghua University.

The faculty also strives to give students field experience through internships at various top companies.

An example would be Harry Hoon Jian Wen, an Electrical and Electronic Engineering student. He was selected to go to the University of Queensland for a research attachment while also successfully completing his internship at Schneider Electric.

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/metro/metro-news/2020/03/28/the-future-through-artificial-intelligence

Meeting industry 4.0 challenges

Friday, March 20th, 2020

Mavis Ong (centre), with her proud parents Ong Bat Por (left) and Lai Joo Leng during her graduation for Inti’s Bachelor of Computer Science programme.

AS Malaysia strives to remain competitive for the future of production, the nation still faces challenges in producing highly skilled labour, and in strengthening its technological and innovative developments. (1)

To meet these challenges, Inti International University & Colleges chief executive officer Tan Lin Nah, and several Inti graduates shared their initiatives in helping the country achieve its Industry 4.0 goals. (2)

In the Global Competitiveness Report 2019, Malaysia fell from 24th to 30th position under the Human Capital pillar, with key indicators such as skillsets of graduates and digital skills dropping in their ranks as well. (3)

Acknowledging these concerns within higher education, Tan explains that Inti’s aim is to strengthen its partnership with key industry players and initiate newer collaborations with global leaders responsible for driving new technologies and human capital development.

Tan says that Inti’s aim is to strengthen its partnership with key industry players and initiate newer collaborations with global leaders responsible for driving new technologies and human capital development.“We partner with Microsoft, AWS, Alibaba, SAS and IBM to deliver boot camps, short courses and additional certifications to our students and members of the public.

“Our recent collaboration with Automation Anywhere, a global robotic process automation (RPA) leader, is part of our efforts in meeting Malaysia’s Industry 4.0 needs, ” shared Tan.

Alex Mak, Inti’s Diploma in Information Technology (IT) and Bachelor in Computer Science alumnus shared that he is especially appreciative of Inti’s curriculum, as it helped to prepare him for his current responsibilities with Microsoft’s Azure Cloud Computing services.

“The additional certifications I received from Inti gave me an added advantage when applying for employment opportunities.

“I also found learning about technologies such as 5G, cloud computing and AI helpful, because it allowed me to adapt quickly to our country’s current innovative expansion, ” shared Mak, a cloud technical consultant.

Mavis Ong and Alex Heng Kong Yew, graduates of Inti International College Penang and Inti International University respectively, shared similar experiences with their current roles in SAP HANA; a memory data platform, and Tableau; a business intelligence tool, both of which are emerging innovations in Asia.

A proponent of technological and innovative expansion in Malaysia, Ong encourages other women to join the STEM industry and encourages them to continue fighting for their dreams.

A lover of technology from a very young age, Ong shared that it took her a few years to convince her parents to accept her decision in pursuing a Diploma in IT and Bachelor’s in Computer Science.

“After seeing me thrive academically and achieving my dreams, they could not be happier and prouder of me, ” shared the beaming first degree holder in her family.

Meanwhile, Heng, a software engineer with Dell and winner of the I-Dell Hack2Hire Competition shared that he and his team members presently empower his clients with tools such as facial recognition, augmented reality and micro-services, and API, as solutions to improve business efficiency and intelligence.

He said, “I see clients on a day-to-day basis and being able to recommend innovative solutions makes me thrilled in knowing I am a part of developing our nation’s efforts for expansion.”

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2020/03/19/meeting-industry-40-challenges

Big Move Towards IR4.0

Tuesday, March 17th, 2020

SEGi’s dynamic duo SEGiRO and RUDY are ready to embrace the future.SEGi’s dynamic duo SEGiRO and RUDY are ready to embrace the future.

SEGi University and Colleges has launched a mega brand campaign that will see the premier tertiary institution moving towards Industrial Revolution 4.0.

To capture the market as a university of choice, SEGi’s brand will include a new “Towards IR4.0” logo as an extension to its mother brand and a phase by phase enhancement of its curricula and campus facilities.

To add excitement and vigour to this brand extension, SEGi has also introduced two brand icons that represent the institution’s journey toward excellence and its strategic direction towards becoming a primary hub for industry-relevant talent and industry-driven research and development.

The brand icons known as SEGi’s dynamic duo SEGiRO and RUDY carry distinctive features but both represent SEGi’s strategies Towards IR4.0.

SEGiRO is derived from the term SEGi’s Hero signifying the institution’s strategic directions while RUDY is an acronym of Are You Ready, which represents SEGi’s effort in grooming graduates to be future-proof.

Future-proof graduates

The IR4.0 has a big impact on the local economy and community. The Government launched the National Policy on IR4.0 (Industry4WRD) in October 2018 to position Malaysia as a total solutions provider for the manufacturing sector in the Asia Pacific by 2025.

This means the IR4.0 industries would require human capital with relevant and adequate digital and data literacy and SEGi is heavily invested in transforming its education system to meet the demands of these industries.

To complement the brand extension, SEGi has initiated several strategies to build a dynamic education pathway that will future-proof graduates.

These strategies include strengthening of industry linkages, inclusion of IR4.0 elements in its curricula and skills development programmes, and the introduction of new and innovative study programmes that are in line with the global trends.

Facilities at SEGi will also be upgraded in phases to expose students to IR4.0 features like smart manufacturing, simulation, smart classrooms, artificial intelligence and others.

Apart from producing holistic and well-balanced graduates with the right skills and competencies that are aligned to the needs of a tech-based economy, these strategies are also expected to contribute towards making Malaysia a favourable destination for high-impact R&D and high-value investments.

With a population of 20,000 local and international students, SEGi stands as one of the most established private higher education institutions in Malaysia.

SEGi emerged in the top 54% of the 2020 QS World University Rankings: Asia and obtained the highest five-star rating in the categories of Teaching, Facilities, Social Responsibility, and Inclusiveness. It also received four stars in the category of Employability, sealing in the overall quality of its education.

Learn all about SEGi’s move Towards IR4.0 and find a relevant study programme for a brighter future. Visit any of the SEGi campuses during its Open Day on March 21-22 for more info. Alternatively, visit www.segi.edu.my.

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2020/03/17/big-move-towards-ir40

Ready to take on IR4.0

Tuesday, January 7th, 2020

APU is equipped with world-class infrastructures that allow students to gain hands-on experience, and exposure to real-time data and scenarios – to emerge as competent technology professionals under a real-world environment.

AS we cross the threshold of a brand new year, we are hurtling fast towards a future that increasingly resembles those depicted in sci-fi movies, with worlds that are increasingly enriched with integrated advanced technology in everyday lives.

Already many of these imagined technologies have already made headway within this decade – cars today are equipped with sensors that assist in driving and we have access to vast amounts of data, right on hand-held devices.

An accumulation of an ongoing tide of industrial revolutions going back to the invention of steam machinery in 18th century Britain, today’s Industrial Revolution 4.0 (IR4.0) is “blurring the distinction among physical, digital and biological spaces, ” as mentioned in the Ministry of International Trade and Industry’s (MITI) national policy called “Industry4WRD”.

The new revolution is set to change how products will be designed, made, used and operated. Maintaining and servicing these new products will also evolve, affecting how operations, processes, supply chain management and energy footprints in factories are utilised.

Nine Strong Pillars

Most industries worldwide look to the Boston Consulting Group’s (BCG) delineation of nine areas that will be affected by IR4.0. These include the processing of big data, the further advancement of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, increasing use of simulations.

Aided by use of cloud technology, technology will be more horizontally and vertically integrated, enabling Internet of Things (IoT), additive manufacturing, integration of augmented reality and cyber security to police against abuse.

While sweeping changes transform industries worldwide, IR4.0 should ultimately be instilled in those who will be affected – the country’s future crop of graduates coming out of the various academic institutions.

Ready for the future

At the forefront of this new wave, is one of Malaysia’s premier private universities, Asia Pacific University of Technology & Innovation (APU). It concentrates on providing a unique fusion of technology, innovation and creativity in preparing graduates for significant roles in business and society globally.

APU innovates by reviewing, developing and delivering programmes that are versatile, current and future-proof. By aligning its framework according to the Nine Pillars, it prepares its students for the impending revolution, through programmes that pivot on technology.

The framework covers IoT, data science, cyber security, cloud computing, AI or intelligent systems, mechatronics, e-business, digital marketing, financial technology (fintech) and mobile technology.

The university also observes the policies outlined in MITI’s Industry4WRD. These key areas are also developed to address the need for talents to transform Malaysia’s Digital Economy. The Industry4WRD policies focus on developing and implementing the right technological infrastructure to allow industries to undergo seamless digital transformation processes.

As an education institution, teaching and learning infrastructure and facilities within APU provide students a comfortable ecosystem for development, where they also receive instruction on the Nine Pillars.

The university is equipped with world-class infrastructures from France, Singapore, Germany, the United Kingdom, among others that allow students to gain hands-on experience, and exposure to real-time data and scenarios – to emerge as competent technology professionals under a real-world environment.

Once such facility at APU is the Cyber Security Talent Zone (CSTZ), which is also Malaysia’s first integrated cyber security talent zone. It houses a military-grade real-time cyber security monitoring software at the full-fledged Cyber Threats Simulation and Response Centre and Security Operations Centre, where students gain real-life exposure and practical experience.

APU nurtures creativity and innovation through its discussion spaces, think tanks, incubation zones and Innovation Labs on its Technology Park Malaysia (TPM), Bukit Jalil campus – which provides an out-of-classroom environment for students.

While its research centres provide students fruits for thought in robotics engineering, IoT, data analytics, forensic and cyber security, business digitisation and innovation, entrepreneurship and leadership.

APU also provides professional transformation by providing platforms for students to formulate world-changing ideas and develop innovative solutions for complex problems faced by industries undergoing digital transformation.

Moulding Job-ready Individuals

One crucial element that can never be replaced by increased mechanisation is of course the human touch. This takes the form of soft skills that are always welcomed by customers in any industry, and hence are qualities that employers look out for.

Students who graduate with this added potential are deemed industry-ready by most employers as they leave their academic institutions. In fact, surveys show that employers value these soft skills, which include communication skills, problem-solving skills, openness to learn and to gain new knowledge.

Such qualities are inculcated at APU for these skills are constantly nurtured on a day-to-day basis.

In addition, the university’s campus environment is home to international students from over 120 countries, offering local students the chance to mingle with a global community.

This is important as events such as the celebration of various countries’ independence days, multicultural nights and other cultural celebrations help instill a global outlook in APU students, encouraging understanding and respect for other nationalities and moulding them as effective communicators in tomorrow’s global economy.

IR4.0 adoption and development also calls for deeper critical-thinking skills. So to complement its world-class facilities, APU developed innovative teaching and learning methods that produce graduates who can think critically, act innovatively and communicate ideas effectively.

C:UserschengmunAppDataLocalMicrosoftWindowsINetCacheContent.OutlookB4SG7VU8apu d342909A.jpg

APU nurtures creativity and innovation while encouraging cross-cultural communication, allowing students to be equipped with the necessary technical and soft skills to be highly employable.

Such international exposures ensure APU graduates are open to differences in opinions, and they are also well-trained to engage in global conversations, international strategies, and multicultural encounters. In essence, they become confident and are highly employable.

All APU students also go through industry-advised, strategically designed curriculums that stress on innovation and advanced digital technologies and automation, readying them for complex, dialectical opportunities once they graduate.

To ensure its graduates are professional and highly employable, APU builds students’ confidence through practical workplace skills within the curriculum. Eventually, once they graduate, they are workplace-ready – a fact that is demonstrated by its students who are professionally attired, even on-campus.

To-date, APU graduates have impressed over 10,000 industrial partners and potential employers, and over 40,000 alumni are employed globally in reputable multinational companies such as Accenture, HP, IBM, Huawei Technologies, Astro, Maybank, Standard Chartered and more.

Building the IR4.0 Workforce

A university plays an important role in future-proofing school leavers and transforming them into industry-ready graduates in collaboration with the industry.

Through APU’s industry-academia partnership with various companies, the university can identify, recognise and mitigate any risk that IR4.0 may pose for its graduates, ensuring they stay competitive against the tide of increasing automation and machines.

To do that, APU formalises ties with various key industry players, in a partnership that involves an entire ecosystem of academic content development and delivery.

This includes regular programme reviews, joint certification and open internship and job opportunities for APU students.

Some of APU’s significant industry partners include:

  • IBM, which APU collaborated with to deliver a series of technical workshops, technology talks, industry visits, and more. This received overwhelming participation from APU students. The university has so far produced over 200 students as IBM certified solution designers and application developers.

  • SAS, which endorses APU’s undergraduate and postgraduate level programmes in data science by providing tools and educational material support for learning and research purposes. All APU data science graduates receive a Joint Professional Certificate from SAS upon completion.

  • Microsoft, which has been an APU industrial partner for over two decades. APU is one of the frontier universities on the Microsoft Talent Development programme. APU students engage directly with Microsoft professionals through workshops and talk sessions and many of them also attained professional Microsoft certification, which allows for greater job prospects. APU has also received the Microsoft Azure Educator Grant Award.

APU students have also won national- and international-level competitions organised by major industry players, such as FAMELab, Intel-CREST Industry-University Challenge, NASA Space Apps Challenge, World Asian Business Case Competition, SAS FinTech Challenge and more.

Students at APU are fully-prepared to join the future global workforce with confidence, not just for their first jobs, but for lifelong careers.

References:

https://www.miti.gov.my/miti/resources/National%20Policy%20on%20Industry%204.0/Industry4WRD_Final.pdf

https://circuitdigest.com/article/what-is-industry-4-and-its-nine-technology-pillars#

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2020/01/06/ready-to-take-on-ir4

Equal opportunities for women

Friday, December 20th, 2019

Chai (front row, right) with her colleagues from Dell.

AS technologies evolve in the Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR 4.0), there is a greater need for equal gender representation in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) to empower diversity of thought and ensure the long-term effectiveness of technological advancements.

In empowering students to meet the needs of IR 4.0, INTI International University and Colleges (INTI) has also taken strides to ensure that students from all backgrounds receive equal opportunities in accessing its programmes and gaining employment opportunities through industry collaborations.

These INTI alumnae share their experiences in breaking the gender gaps in their own careers.

“Annabelle Chai Loo Lyn, a Diploma in Information Technology graduate from INTI International College Penang, currently works as an analyst with renowned technology leader Dell.”

INTI International College Penang, currently works as an analyst with renowned technology leader Dell.

After a year at Dell, Chai became the pioneer analyst for the organisation’s Global Email Operations in Penang, overseeing the group’s email campaigns, analytics, trends and outcomes.

“My job allows me to better understand our customers and their needs. Through data analysis, we produce more informed solutions for the organisation, which in turn helps to generate better products and services, and enables us to grow our business, ” shared Chai.

Sharing similar experiences, Nur Syafiyah Nabilah Arman, a 24-year-old graduate of INTI International University’s Bachelor of Computer Science programme, currently works as an information systems audit associate in KPMG.

Nur Syafiyah is responsible for developing approaches that demonstrate effective IT compliance to sustain KPMG’s business values.

“I perform inspections on our clients’ IT system controls to ensure that they are effective and generate accurate data.

This helps organisations manage their financial systems’ security risks, which directly impact their efficiency and quality, ” she explained.

“The career preparation workshops I attend at INTI during my final semester helped me tremendously in achieving my potential.”

Florence Pereira, an IP Validation Engineer at Intel Technology Sdn Bhd, shares similar sentiments about studying at INTI.

The Diploma in Information and Communication Technology graduate recalled how she initially struggled in her first year at INTI because she was not familiar with the technicalities of the industry.

“My results improved because our lecturers leveraged discussions, videos and presentations to make our classes more engaging. I always left my classes wanting to find out more about what I was learning, ” Pereira recalled.

Her determination paid off when she was offered a job as a graduate trainee at Intel even before graduating.

“Many multinational companies are on the lookout for women to join the engineering sector because they bring different ideas and solutions.

“Take that first step in your STEM dream and the rest will fall into place, ” Pereira advised students.

INTI chief executive officer Tan Lin Nah said, “In addition to increasing diversity and inclusiveness in the workplace, addressing gender parity in STEM has positive economic implications, with Mckinsey estimating an increase of US$28 trillion (RM116 trillion) to the global annual GDP by the year 2025 through such efforts. (1)

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2019/12/19/equal-opportunities-for-women

Industry players bring STEM beyond the classroom

Wednesday, December 18th, 2019
Telekom Malaysia Bhd and Creative Mind’s TM Nano Maker Kit programme exposes school teachers and students to data logging.
By Rayyan Rafidi - December 18, 2019 @ 11:21am

AS an emerging technology in the Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR 4.0), data logging involves collecting information to analyse specific trends in a system or network.

Telekom Malaysia Bhd (TM), under its corporate social responsibility initiative, recently collaborated with Creative Minds — a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education provider ― to champion the TM Nano Maker Kit programme.

Serving as a unique approach to learning STEM, the programme introduced students and teachers in Kuala Lumpur and Selangor to data-logging using a palm-sized data logger — an electronic device that detects changes in a natural phenomena with a higher speed and accuracy compared with analog methods.

Creative Minds operations manager Syed Abdul Hadi Syed Abdul Rahman said the wireless technology allowed students to undertake more challenging outdoor experiments.

“With the data logger, students can conduct experiments and collect relevant data, such as velocity, magnetic influx, as well as changes in temperature, air pressure and the air pollutant index (API).

“This programme enables students to maximise the use of technology in mathematics and science through data analysis, a methodology rarely introduced in STEM compared with domains such as robotics and programming.”

“We help schools by supplying them with the latest technology enablers and platforms to develop students with 21st century competency.”

With the concept of “The world is your classroom”, students get to explore the natural phenomena without being restricted to the classroom.

“There are a lot of limitations in the classroom to study natural phenomena. This is due to technological barriers, which inhibit scientific investigations.

“This programme aims to lift the barrier by using the mobile and easy-to-use data loggers such as PocketLab. Students and teachers don’t have to worry too much about the equipment and can focus more on learning and proving scientific concepts,” said Syed Abdul Hadi.

Syed Abdul Hadi Syed Abdul Rahman.

Students’ interest in STEM could be nurtured by encouraging exploration, he added.

“Compared with lab experiments, students are more familiar with the natural phenomena. They have grown accustomed to these without realising the scientific concepts behind them.

“By giving them the tools to investigate phenomena easily, students will have more opportunities in learning STEM. This will boost their interest to explore the field. Ultimately, we don’t want students who only understand textbook contents, but we want to produce future scientists who understand the world.”

True to the concept, the recent haze had provided an opportunity for students to conduct scientific investigations.

SMK Bandar Baru Sungai Buloh students recorded air pollution index (API) readings by conducting a data logging experiment in their school.

Student Nik Nur Ayuni Nik Rosni said: “The device was easy to use as I was able to relate the experiment to mathematics and physics, such as graphs, scientific formulae and data analysis. The scientific concepts become clearer when we learn about data analysis.

“If we communicate with the local authorities, we can document the results under a research initiative and disseminate the readings to local residents,” she said.

Students also developed an awareness of global challenges through the programme.

Suraya Mohammad Shariman said she used scientific knowledge to investigate real-world problems.

A Creative Minds representative (right) showing a SMK Bandar Baru Sungai Buloh’s teacher and her students how to use the data logger to obtain an air pollutant index reading.

“It was an eye-opening experience because the activity allowed us to relate to our school lessons effectively.

“For instance, we tabulated the data and generated a graph. From the graph, we were able to identify the API range in Sungai Buloh.

“There were many uncertainties due to factors like wind direction, test location and hand movements that may affect data collection. So, we had to use our knowledge in math to find the median.”

SMK Bandar Baru Sungai Buloh teacher and adviser Siti Hadijah Supian said: “My students have become better learners because they can apply what they learnt in mathematics and physics in a more practical way.

“Moreover, exposing students to technology-based learning, in line with IR 4.0, will prepare them to face a challenging future.”

Syed Abdul Hadi said: “To address recent pollution cases, which contribute to climate change, we need to educate the younger generation dynamically. With the right education and exposure, they will be prepared as future leaders.”

The TM Nano Maker Kit programme was supported by Multimedia University (MMU) in Cyberjaya and the Education Ministry.

“MMU provided us with the expertise of its faculty members. Hence, the programme gained better industrial exposure in line with a revolutionised education system,” added Syed Abdul Hadi.

By Rayyan Rafidi

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2019/12/548868/industry-players-bring-stem-beyond-classroom

Competition to promote innovative ideas

Wednesday, December 4th, 2019

(bottom row, eighth from left) Unimaker 2019 secretariat chairperson Prof Dr Rofina Yasmin Othman together with other secretariat members, participants and sponsors, after the Unimaker 2019 workshop.

IR 4.0 HAS brought with it many new technologies and disruptive new models that change the way we live.

However, what does all this mean for sustainable development and future-proofing ourselves?

This is the challenge Malaysia’s future graduates took on to figure out in the Unimaker National Innovation Competition 2019.

The competition is to promote innovative ideas created with the theme “Solving Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Problems in the Era of IR4.0”.

“The Industrial 4.0 can make a considerable contribution to meet the SDGs. It advances human wellbeing in a range or areas such as healthcare, water, agriculture and livelihoods, natural resource management, energy and infrastructure,” says Higher Education Department director-general Datuk Dr Siti Hamisah Tapsir.

She adds that the theme is in line with the ministry’s tagline “University for Society” to reflect universities’ pivotal role within local and global communities.

The competition was initiated by her department and is in line with the seventh shift in the Malaysian Education Blueprint 2015-2025 (Higher Education), which is Innovation Ecosystem., says Siti Hamisah.

She also says that the higher education sector must prepare graduates to handle new technologies and embrace IR 4.0.

“Thus the need to redesign the education system and transform the learning and teaching delivery as well as for industry sectors to enhance, reskill and upscale talents.”

She adds that although technology is pivotal for education in the 21st century, skills such as critical and creative thinking, and communicative skills cannot be taught by machines.

The Unimaker National Innovation Competition 2019 was organised by the Education Ministry’s Higher Education Department in collaboration with Universiti Malaya (UM) for the second year running.

More than 40 finalist teams from 20 public institutions of higher education (IPTAs) competed in the finals.

The finalists attended a preparation workshop to explore some of the modules including Design Thinking, Presentation and Hardware & Software Prototype.

The top three winners received cash prizes, prototype grants and guidance from sponsors, and sponsorship of a co-working space at MaGIC, facilities utilisation at Makers @ University, award plaques and certificates. They will also be listed in the Futurity initiative.

There was also an exhibition by the finalists at the Industrial Revolution 4.0 Education Colloquium to promote their innovative ideas.

The programme was funded by the Higher Education Department, sponsored by Futurise Sendirian Berhad, MyCRO, Malaysian Global Innovation and Creativity Centre (MaGIC) Global Entrepreneurship Movement Association, and e-fm was the official media channel.

It was jointly led by UM, representing the Central Zone, Universiti Sains Malaysia representing the Northern Zone, Southern Region by Universiti Teknologi Malaysia representing the Southern Zone and Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin representing the Eastern Zone.

Universiti Malaysia Sarawak represented Sabah and Sarawak.

Competition to promote innovative ideas

Sunday, December 1st, 2019

(bottom row, eighth from left) Unimaker 2019 secretariat chairperson Prof Dr Rofina Yasmin Othman together with other secretariat members, participants and sponsors, after the Unimaker 2019 workshop.

IR 4.0 HAS brought with it many new technologies and disruptive new models that change the way we live.

However, what does all this mean for sustainable development and future-proofing ourselves?

This is the challenge Malaysia’s future graduates took on to figure out in the Unimaker National Innovation Competition 2019.

The competition is to promote innovative ideas created with the theme “Solving Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Problems in the Era of IR4.0”.

“The Industrial 4.0 can make a considerable contribution to meet the SDGs. It advances human wellbeing in a range or areas such as healthcare, water, agriculture and livelihoods, natural resource management, energy and infrastructure,” says Higher Education Department director-general Datuk Dr Siti Hamisah Tapsir.

She adds that the theme is in line with the ministry’s tagline “University for Society” to reflect universities’ pivotal role within local and global communities.

The competition was initiated by her department and is in line with the seventh shift in the Malaysian Education Blueprint 2015-2025 (Higher Education), which is Innovation Ecosystem., says Siti Hamisah.

She also says that the higher education sector must prepare graduates to handle new technologies and embrace IR 4.0.

“Thus the need to redesign the education system and transform the learning and teaching delivery as well as for industry sectors to enhance, reskill and upscale talents.”

She adds that although technology is pivotal for education in the 21st century, skills such as critical and creative thinking, and communicative skills cannot be taught by machines.

The Unimaker National Innovation Competition 2019 was organised by the Education Ministry’s Higher Education Department in collaboration with Universiti Malaya (UM) for the second year running.

More than 40 finalist teams from 20 public institutions of higher education (IPTAs) competed in the finals.

The finalists attended a preparation workshop to explore some of the modules including Design Thinking, Presentation and Hardware & Software Prototype.

The top three winners received cash prizes, prototype grants and guidance from sponsors, and sponsorship of a co-working space at MaGIC, facilities utilisation at Makers @ University, award plaques and certificates. They will also be listed in the Futurity initiative.

There was also an exhibition by the finalists at the Industrial Revolution 4.0 Education Colloquium to promote their innovative ideas.

The programme was funded by the Higher Education Department, sponsored by Futurise Sendirian Berhad, MyCRO, Malaysian Global Innovation and Creativity Centre (MaGIC) Global Entrepreneurship Movement Association, and e-fm was the official media channel.

It was jointly led by UM, representing the Central Zone, Universiti Sains Malaysia representing the Northern Zone, Southern Region by Universiti Teknologi Malaysia representing the Southern Zone and Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin representing the Eastern Zone.

By REBECCA RAJAENDRAM
Read more @
https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2019/12/01/competition-to-promote-innovative-ideas#8HSbGdAiliCbrbOx.99

Preparing communicators for a digital future

Saturday, November 23rd, 2019

Mobile technology has changed the way we communicate today.

MOBILE technology has changed the way we communicate today. With more than five billion people around the world currently owning a mobile device – half of which are smartphones – one would be hard-pressed to imagine a time when mobile phones were not part and parcel of everyday life.

Whether it’s WhatsApp chat groups, subscribed Twitter feeds or Facebook live broadcasts, the rise of social media means that communication is no longer a one-way street. Not only are people able to obtain information instantly and in different forms, but they generate content as well.

“Technology has made the way we consume information more visual, such as the use of memes to make sense of things. In some ways, digital and social media have made it easier for lots of people to express themselves and be heard. Still, there needs to be an understanding of who gets to say what, the power dynamics inherent in contemporary forms of communication, ” said Monash University Malaysia’s School of Arts and Social Sciences Communication and Media Studies Assoc Prof Emma Baulch.

Universities have to continually reassess programmes to ensure the course content is relevant and effective.Universities have to continually reassess programmes to ensure the course content is relevant and effective

Why theory matters

As educators of the future workforce, universities have to continually reassess programmes to ensure the course content is relevant and effective in producing graduates that are market-ready and well equipped to tackle digital disruptions that come their way.

According to Baulch, instead of focusing on the technical know-how of the latest in communication technology, Monash University Malaysia’s new Bachelor of Digital Media and Communication (BDMC) course aims to build a strong foundation in media and communications theories, albeit with a digital focus.

The new BDMC course aims to build a strong foundation in media and communications theories, albeit with a digital focus.The new BDMC course aims to build a strong foundation in media and communications theories, albeit with a digital focus.

“This course sits within an arts school, so there is an emphasis on theories and concepts that look at digital within a social context. We look at how digital shapes society, which fits in with universities’ historical role in developing theoretical and conceptual knowledge around contemporary developments, ” she said.

Understanding how digital media sit within a broader context of history gives students a greater appreciation of what makes digital unique so that they can better figure out how new technologies shape the future and forge social change, Baulch added.

“We talk about how to develop critical thinking when engaging in a digital environment rife with misinformation. We also provide an understanding of the particular ways digital content circulates. If you understand how content becomes viral, you will then understand the possibilities digital environments present for things like corporate communications or crisis communications, ” she said.

Multiple career pathways

A communications degree is not just reserved for media professionals, said Baulch. Potential careers BDMC students can look forward to include public relations, corporate communications, marketing, advertising, policy development, HR, management, research, editing and writing.

“We are training people to have knowledge and skills that are transferable across different sectors and industries. Social theories are important to this skill set. They afford a critical reading of the way things are in the world, and how they might be changed. Without critical knowledge, tasks requiring leadership or management skills become very difficult, ” she said.

Through the course, students learn research skills essential to cultivate critical thinking and to become agile thinkers. There is also a strong emphasis in developing written and oral communications skills, as well as skills in group work.

“You need to think for yourself and be flexible if you’re to keep up with the changes in digital environments, ” she said.

The course also includes a professional practice stream in which students undertake a digital research project with an NGO and undergo an internship for practical experience and exposure.

“This stream is strongly supported by our industry partners who provide vital input on industry perspectives and needs, ” she said.

A Monash degree gives students “international mobility”.A Monash degree gives students “international mobility”.

Having a Monash degree gives students “international mobility” because the Monash brand is globally recognised

Established in 1998, Monash University Malaysia was the first Monash campus outside Australia. The Malaysian campus has approximately 8,400 students from 78 different countries. Monash University has 60,000 students internationally and a community of over 380,000 alumni living in 155 countries.

With over 100 partner universities worldwide, Monash students can opt for international mobility schemes as part of their course.

While there is a lot of hype over pursuing a career in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) in the digital age, mastering communications is still pertinent. “Digital communications is now part of our every waking moment. Nearly every individual on the planet has a mobile phone. Those with an understanding of the social and cultural challenges and possibilities of digital change will be among those to shape the future, ” said Baulch.

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2019/11/22/preparing-communicators-for-a-digital-future#c6o0oqlmR378r4Il.99