Archive for the ‘Curriculum’ Category

Agriculture to become curriculum activities in secondary school

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

NILAI: Integrated science can become one of the curriculum activities in secondary schools nationwide, said Agriculture and Agro-Based Industry Minister Datuk Sri Ismail Sabri Yaakob.

He said the minister encourage agriculture in schools as it was previously not being given any attention.

“The involvement of youths in agriculture is somewhat wanting with only 15 percent involved in the sector. So we want to nurture the interest among youths through students at schools,” he told reporters after the ‘Malam Ramah Mesra’ function, organised by Cempaka International Ladies College (CILC), Bandar Enstek near here last night.

He said the matter would be discussed with Deputy Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin, who is also Education Minister so that agriculture could be made a curriculum in schools.

“We will start at secondary schools and we expect it will be launched next year,” he said, adding that CILC which is equipped with suitable land for agriculture and fish ponds would be used as the pilot project initially.

BERNAMA.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/node/31937

Curriculum Definition

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014

Defining Curriculum

Curriculum refers to the means and materials with which students will interact for the purpose of achieving identified educational outcomes. Arising in medieval Europe was the trivium, an educational curriculum based upon the study of grammar, rhetoric, and logic. The later quadrivium (referring to four subjects rather than three as represented by the trivium) emphasized the study of arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy. These seven liberal arts should sound a lot like what you experienced during your formal education.

The emphasis on single subjects persists even today. Very likely you moved from classroom to classroom, particularly throughout your secondary education, studying a different subject with each teacher. Yet there was more to your education. Perhaps you participated in athletics, or the band, or clubs, or student government, or made the choice not to participate in any extracurricular activities. All of these (including the option not to participate) are part of what we might call the contemporary curriculum. But there is more.

Some educators would say that the curriculum consists of all the planned experiences that the school offers as part of its educational responsibility. Then there are those who contend that the curriculum includes not only the planned, but also the unplanned experiences as well. For example, incidents of violence that have occurred at a number of schools across the nation are hardly a planned component of the curriculum. However, the manner in which violence is addressed before, during, and after the actual event sends a very definite message about how people in our culture interact and how the laws of our nation are applied.

Another perspective suggests that curriculum involves organized rather than planned experiences because any event must flow of its own accord, the outcome not being certain beforehand. For instance, competitions, whether academic or athletic, can be organized, but the outcomes will depend on a myriad of factors that cannot be planned.

Which brings us to the notion of emphasizing outcomes versus experiences. This shift to the notion of outcomes is very much in keeping with the current movement toward accountability in the public schools, that is, the perspective that there are indeed specific things that the schools are supposed to accomplish with children. District personnel, school administrators, and you as one of many teachers are to be held accountable by the public/taxpayers for ensuring that those objectives are met.

Curriculum, it turns out, is indeed much more than the idea of specific subjects as represented by the trivium or the quadrivium. And, as we will see in the next section, it can be characterized not only by what it does include but also by what it intentionally excludes.

by Edward S. Ebert II, Christine Ebert, Michael L. Bentley.

Read more @ http://www.education.com/reference/article/curriculum-definition/

Adenan Wants Environment Concern To Be Included In Curriculum

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

KUCHING:  Environment care and concern should be included in the education curriculum as one of the aspects that need to be looked upon to tackle such issues, said Sarawak Chief Minister Tan Sri Adenan Satem.

He said there was a need to urgently review the curriculum so that the growth of environmental-economic based strategies would be apt with the changing times.

“We have to move from the traditional and static structure of our environment policy and guidelines to accommodate changes that will bring in more dynamism to the economic and environmental growth,” he said at the launch of the International Federation of Landscape Architects Asia-Pacific Region (IFLA-APR) Conference here today.

His text of speech was read by State Local Government and Community Development Minister, Datuk Seri Wong Soon Koh.

Adenan said the development in economy and technology, which had resulted in the emergence of new knowledge and working approaches, had also raised the importance of environment protection.

BERNAMA.

Read more @ http://education.bernama.com/index.php?sid=news_content&id=1034141

More art schools for budding talents

Thursday, January 2nd, 2014

JOHOR BARU: Budding artistes can look forward to blooming into great talents, with more arts schools in the works over the next few years.

One school is already up and running here while two more, in Kuala Lumpur and Kuching, are expected to open their doors by 2016.

Education Ministry secretary-general Datuk Dr Madinah Mohamad said the ministry planned to increase the number of arts schools as an alternative to schools providing formal education and to encourage youngsters to express themselves through art.

“Arts schools have become the preferred choice of many students, with an increasing number of applications each year.

“However, entering an arts school is not easy as it has stringent conditions. Students have to go through an interview, audition and pass a test before they are accepted,” she told reporters after a ceremony to hand over the keys to the new RM61mil Sekolah Seni Johor Baru building at Bandar Seri Alam here yesterday. He said there were 350 students at the school.

Dr Madinah said that with the Malaysia Education Blueprint (MEB), the Government aims to make the country’s education system one of the best in the world by 2025.

by Mohd Farhaan Shah.

Read more @ http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Nation/2014/01/01/More-art-schools-for-budding-talents/

Financial education to be introduced in school soon

Wednesday, October 9th, 2013

KUALA LUMPUR: Financial education will be incorporated into the school curriculum in stages from next year.

Bank Negara assistant governor Abu Hassan Alshari Yahaya said the central bank, in a collaboration with the Education Ministry, would introduce it to Year 3 students next year and secondary school students from 2017.

“Part of the financial education elements have been introduced this year in Bahasa Malaysia and Maths subjects, ahead of the targeted date,” he said during the launch of the Financial Literacy Month yesterday.

Abu Hassan said financial education needed to be inculcated continuously from a young age to adulthood to help instill discipline and increase their financial management skills.

He said the curriculum would cover money management, planning, savings and investments, credit and debt management and insurance.

Abu Hassan said that parents should not rely only on the school curriculum for their children to be prudent with their finances as they should share the responsibility.

Between January and August, the number of consumers going to Bank Negara for financial advice and information went up from 264,306 to 290,696, a 10% increase, compared to the same period last year, he said.

Total complaints reduced from 5,824 cases to 5,661, he added.

“This means that consumers are now taking positive steps to know and understand their rights and responsibilities on financial products and services,” he said.

Since 2008, Bank Negara had received 1.4 million enquiries and complaints from individuals and entrepreneurs at an average of 1,700 a day.

by  Loh Foon Fong,

Read more @ http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Nation/2013/10/08/Financial-education-to-be-introduced-in-school-soon.aspx

Self-esteem of a nation

Saturday, August 3rd, 2013

INNER STRENGTH: The bedrocks of national unity are founded in homes and schools.

IN 1987, the National Union of the Teaching Profession submitted the New Secondary School Curriculum Memoranda to the Education Ministry. The overarching theme of the memorandum is: Towards a balanced, flexible curriculum which builds self-esteem among students.

Millions of students have gone through the curriculum. However, what of the self-esteem, self-concept, self-confidence and character-building?

Twenty-five years later, studies and anecdotal reports, particularly, from employers, observed that typically, students lack skills in communication, teamwork, leadership, language, interpersonal and other soft skills.

Among students who do not do well in interviews, the lack of self-confidence and self-esteem is observed.

It is not acceptable to have a school system where education becomes subversive and its graduates do not have high self-esteem because of detractors in the system and in the wider culture. It is the sacred responsibility of the education system to ensure that the self-esteem of every learner is developed.

The education system has many significant ideas but there seems to be more ideas than champions. Champions connected to power groups and individuals of a particular era cease to be champions when the individuals or groups retire or move to some other power domains. Policy and practice amnesia exist because of discontinuous commitments and leadership.

It is necessary and urgent to cultivate leaders who are mission-driven rather than those driven merely for personal interests or for approval of the patrons of the times.

Systems that are forgetful lose the strength of synergy and energy that comes from historical foundations.

A failed nation is a nation where social capital is low and the people do not trust themselves, each other, or the leaders.

by Datuk Dr Ibrahim Ahmad Bajunid .

Making the Most of Fieldwork Learning Experiences

Sunday, August 12th, 2012

Fieldwork refers to any component of the curriculum that involves leaving the classroom and learning through firsthand experience. Most instructors incorporate fieldwork to help students understand theory, develop skills, integrate knowledge, build tacit knowledge, develop meaning in places, and work with peers and instructors in alternate settings.

Despite our best intentions, fieldwork experiences can fail miserably for many reasons. For example, an unexpected traffic jam can reduce time at a study site, a sudden rainstorm can send everyone running for cover, or a guest naturalist can fail to show up at the appointed time and place. Conditions in the field are often unpredictable and can affect learning outcomes. Even so, there are practices that do improve fieldwork experiences.

First, fieldwork assignments should have clear and integrated goals. I recommend choosing a few key objectives and sticking to them. Expecting a field experience to accomplish too many objectives can dilute the experience and leave students frustrated. We wrongly assume that students will learn simply by engaging in field experiences; these experiences need to be an integrated part of the larger curriculum. I recently heard this loud and clear from students doing an individualized community-service learning assignment in a large introductory environmental studies course. They decried the lack of time taken in the course to analyze and integrate their field experiences.

Second, successful fieldwork requires preparation by students and instructors alike. Successful fieldwork builds on and extends competencies gained in earlier in-class or field experiences. For that reason, students need to understand and appreciate the underlying theory, past studies, and methods related to their upcoming trip. This context enhances learning, deepens insight, strengthens critical thinking, and increases adaptability. Instructors prepare students to make efficient use of their time during the field exercise by providing clear instructions and expectations for assessment. Instructors also need to prepare their equipment, anticipating all manner of safety and logistical contingencies as well as the range of site conditions (such as weather) that will affect fieldwork. Instructors must also balance the need for structure, comfort, and familiarity (e.g., traditional lab experiences) with the need for excitement and novel experiences (e.g., new environments).

Third, instructors should be flexible so they can take advantage of spontaneous opportunities that may arise. For example, if a flock of swans fly, students may be frustrated if they can’t stop to take a look because they are supposed to be staring at the ground, madly trying to measure vegetation characteristics for a biology lab. If an instructor is flexible, unexpected events can contribute directly to, or provide context for, the objectives of the field exercise.

Fourth, students and instructors should reflect on all aspects of their field experiences. Reflection increases learning because it provides an opportunity to examine the meaning and significance of experiences, sightings, data, or encounters. This reflection might take the form of a required journal, a group “debrief,” or a sharing circle at the end of an afternoon trip. Reflection immediately after an experience is most productive and relevant. Both the instructor and the students might want to create a list of “recommendations” that could improve an activity for future students.

Fifth, choosing a location for a field experience is important.
On one hand, local choices are relatively inexpensive, are relevant to students, and give them an opportunity to provide a finished product for community use.

by Glen T. Hyenegaard, PhD.

Read more @ http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/curriculum-development/making-the-most-of-fieldwork-learning-experiences/

No place for Geography

Sunday, October 31st, 2010

THE Education Ministry had some years ago made History a compulsory subject for all SPM (Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia) students. Recently it stated that from 2013, all students must obtain at least a pass at SPM level. Umno deputy president Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin, who is also Education Minister, said this was like Bahasa Malaysia where SPM candidates must pass before they could get a certificate.

The Ministry will also introduce History as a subject to all Year One pupils in 2014.

While the move to give History such an elevated status should be welcomed, it has been at the expense of sidelining the importance of Geography in secondary schools.

As it is, Geography as a subject has already moved down in terms of importance.

Several schools in Seremban, Negri Sembilan, have already dropped the subject from their SPM list since it is an elective, and this in turn has reduced the number of candidates sitting for the subject in the STPM examination. I am sure there are schools in other states that have also done the same.

Up to the 1980s, Geography covered all the continents of the world and was made compulsory for all Science stream students in Forms Four and Five. Geography is the study of the earth.

It helps students to have an understanding of the countries so that they can relate to what they read in the newspapers or views on television. From trade and commerce, the subject touches on a country’s imports, exports, vegetation, weather, population, economy, demography, wildlife, forests and industries, and the type of natural disasters it is prone to such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, floods and typhoons.

With fewer students studying Geography, we Malaysians will one day become like some foreigners in the West, who think Malaysians live on trees! I recall reading about the 10-year-old English girl Tilly Smith who saved her family and friends from the deadly 2004 tsunami on a beach in Thailand because she detected its arrival by observing the bubbles on the shore, as she had learnt about it in her Geography lessons.

I have never regretted studying Geography as I have always found it interesting and informative. The authorities, by giving importance to History, have sidelined Geography even further.

The government should not be hasty in making decisions especially if it was done with an ulterior motive or political agenda. Ultimately, it is the students who will suffer.

by Jesu Maria Selvam.

Read more @ http://thestar.com.my/education/story.asp?file=/2010/10/31/education/7309317&sec=education

Students’ progress in line with capabilities

Friday, June 11th, 2010

A NEW curriculum for primary and secondary schools will be introduced.

The current Integrated Primary School Curriculum will be replaced by the Standard Primary School Curriculum in 2011 and this is to be followed by a new curriculum for secondary schools.

Modular in design, the curriculum will provide an avenue for students to progress according to their capabilities and nurture them to be responsible for their own learning through exploration to unleash their potential.

The curriculum will emphasise on creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship across all subjects as inculcating values and ethics from a young age is key to the character building of an individual.

The new curriculum will incorporate the principles of 1Malaysia in the teaching approach to deliver education. In addition to develop well-rounded students that excel academically and in sports, the new curriculum will include sports as a subject beginning 2011.

Under the ‘1Student, 1Sports’ policy, each student is required to take up at least one sport.

Secondary school students would get 90 minutes while primary school pupils would spend 60 minutes a week to play a game of their choice.

The annual sports grant would be increased to RM4 from RM2.40 per primary school pupil and RM4 to RM6 for secondary school students.

Public-private partnerships in the provision of basic education allows significant autonomy to school operators in exchange for delivering specified improvements in student outcomes under a formal performance contract. Examples include charter schools in the United States, specialist schools and academy schools in the United Kingdom and independent schools in Sweden. Similarly, such partnerships has existed in Malaysia in some independent Chinese schools.

The Government will introduce the Trust School framework for selected existing government schools.

Trust schools are government schools that are managed jointly by private partners and civil service school leaders under the umbrella of the Education Ministry.

Read more @ http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2010/6/11/nation/6436127&sec=nation

“How equipped am I for my future?”

Thursday, May 13th, 2010
Ministry of Education (MOE) would like to refer to an article by Lim Wee Yen, Petaling Jaya, published in THE SUN dated 30 April 2010 on the issue of – How equipped am i for my future?

The Ministry of Education (MOE) appreciates and values the comments put forward by the writer regarding the perception of the emphases in the national school curriculum, relative to the writer’s personal schooling experience. Nonetheless, education in Malaysia is based on the National Philosophy of Education (NPE) which forms the underlying principles for all educational programmes implemented in the country.

The principles inherent in the NPE are paramount towards the conceptualization and design of the national school curriculum. Hence, the national school curriculum is put in place to ensure that education in Malaysia is a continuous integrated process towards the development of individuals who are physically, emotionally, spiritually and intellectually balanced, individuals who internalize and practice desirable moral values and eventually towards developing individuals who become responsible and meaningful citizens of the nation.

The implementation of the Integrated Primary School Curriculum (IPSC) and the Integrated Secondary School Curriculum (ISSC) in schools echo the aspirations outlined in the NPE. Towards developing the full potentials of the individual’s intellectual, emotional, spiritual and physical domain, the national school curriculum prescribed learning outcomes for the types and levels of knowledge, skills and values pupils need to acquire relative to the different stages of schooling. Specific types and number of subjects ranging from the disciplines of the sciences, humanities, values and technology are introduced which take into account the curriculum emphases relevant to each stage of schooling.

The IPSC and ISSC give strong emphases on effective pedagogical approaches which stimulate curiosity, exploration, critical and creative thinking as well as innovation through student-centered classroom activities. Teachers are trained to employ diverse teaching and learning approaches to suit the intellectual, emotional, spiritual and physical capacities of their pupils. The IPSC and ISSC promote the creative use of any available resources to make the teaching and learning process fun and meaningful. This eliminates the notion that teaching and learning can only take place in the classroom, but more so encourage teachers to use facilities and venues locally available within or even outside the school premises as creative resources for the exploration of knowledge, skills and values.

Creative teaching and learning classroom approaches need also be completed by effective and meaningful assessment strategies. The IPSC and ISSC promotes continuous formative school-based assessment which is not only restricted to the pen and paper testing method but to include and myriad of other assessment procedures such as portfolio assessments, group works and projects. These other forms of assessments enable teachers to assess the integration of multiple disciplines and even possibly reflect the internalization and practice of values such as cooperation and team work as well as development of skills such as communication, ICT and elements of creativity which pen and paper assessments fail to indentify and acknowledge. Teachers are also trained to use the data from the assessments to design remedial activities to counter pupils’ weaknesses or draw up enrichment activities to further develop pupil’s potentials.

It is also important to emphasize that the principles of IPSC and ISSC is against the practice of profiling pupils according to their intellectual capacities. Pupils of mixed abilities are placed within a classroom so that they learn together and encourage healthy competition among themselves.

From the national school curriculum perspective, education in Malaysia is geared towards fully developing the intellectual, emotional, spiritual and physical potential of an individual. The curriculum provides opportunity for pupils to acquire prescribed knowledge, skills and values relevant to their present needs and future challenges. Teachers promote the inculcation of creativity and innovation among pupils by generating creative and meaningful learning experience using diverse available resources. The national curriculum also promotes assessment methods which are able to delineate a holistic perspective of an individual’s potential, lest avoiding the profiling of individual pupils according to their marked academic excellence alone.

Corporate Communication Unit,
Ministry of Education Malaysia.