Archive for the ‘Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics’ Category

Early exposure to STEM degrees

Tuesday, March 10th, 2020
Azhar Hazim Mohd Ubaidullah (left) testing a light bulb holder during a session on circuit testing at the 21st Century Electronics Bootcamp 2020 held at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia.

EXPOSURE to potential careers and university courses can help students decide on their field of interest and ease the transition into tertiary education.

The recent 21st Century Electronics Bootcamp 2020 held at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) served as a platform for Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) leavers to gain key skills and knowledge that can prepare them for an engineering or a STEM degree.

Fourteen students from across the nation gained hands-on experience and technological know-how such as learning to use Arduino, a platform for building electronics projects.

BANGI 10 FEBRUARI 2020. Nur Ain Zulaikha Zamri (right) and her team member Raja Haikal Raja Arifshah presenting their smart house prototype to PKAS director Dr Kalaivani Chellappan (fifth from right) and UKM Engineering, Built Environment Faculty Undergraduates deputy dean Professor Ir Dr Siti Rozaimah (sixth from right) and visitors at the 21st Century Electronics Bootcamp 2020. NSTP/INTAN NUR ELLIANA ZAKARIA

Working in teams to tackle life problems using engineering principles, their ideas were translated into prototypes by the end of the programme.

Nur Ain Zulaikha Zamri, 18, who formerly studied at MRSM Bentong, said: “The most priceless experience that I had was learning about the Internet of things (IoT) and the Arduino software which expanded my design-thinking skills.

“I learnt about this software at school but it was just at surface level. The bootcamp taught me to code properly and how to design and assemble printed circuit boards (PCB) using applications like TraxMaker and CircuitMaker.”

For her group project, Nur Ain took part in creating a smart house prototype with smart lighting by applying the IoT principles.

“We equipped the prototype with a light-dependent resistance (LDR) sensor which was programmed to light up the house. Carrying out this project was eyeopening and it developed my interest in the electrical engineering field.”

In its second year, the month-long programme was spearheaded by the UKM Engineering and Built Environment Faculty’s Graduates Academic Competency Empowerment Programme (PKAS).

Participants were also able to tour research laboratories, architectural studios and other university facilities.

Nur Ain said she felt lucky to get a taste of student life at a top university.

“I gained university experience through our group projects and weekly presentations. I realised the value of STEM knowledge and how it can contribute to my personal development and nation building.”

BANGI 13 FEBRUARI 2020. Muhammad Imran Safwan Jeffiry. NSTP/INTAN NUR ELLIANA ZAKARIA

Coming from a day school, Muhammad Imran Safwan Jeffiry, 18, said the programme opened up a new world of possibilities.

“I was exposed to various engineering disciplines such as chemical engineering. I also learnt how to code using Arduino.

“This bootcamp has helped me realise my interest in architecture and civil engineering,” said the SMK Malim, Melaka alumnus.

Azhar Hazim Mohd Ubaidullah, 18, who previously studied at MRSM Pengkalan Chepa, Kelantan said the programme taught him about perseverance and the different engineering specialisations.

“For our project, I struggled initially to get the desired output. But I learnt to troubleshoot and find different ways to solve the problem.

“We visited each engineering department and were exposed to their syllabuscontents briefly. For example, in the civil engineering department, we saw how they process the materials to build structures,” he said.

Muhammad Imran added: “At the chemical engineering department, we learnt about the properties of organic compounds and how they are turned into products.”

On the same team, the two students came up with an Arduino-based passwordprotected door lock prototype.

Azhar Hazim said: “Users can lock and unlock their house doors remotely just by using a mobile application. A password is sent to the lock using the app. If the door is not closed properly, an LED light and alarm will go off.”

Who came up with the idea for the prototype?

“It was a team effort,” said Muhammad Imran.

“After designing the circuit, we conducted the PCB etching by immersing the board into an acid bath. Only the required copper traces were left behind. Then we connected the PCB and the lock system to the internet,” he said.

Azhar Hazim, who aspires to be a software engineer, added: “We also learnt to market our products using analytics and were able to put our knowledge into practice.”

The experience gained at the bootcamp has guided their decision on academic matters.

Alif Amaluddin, 19, Universiti Teknologi Mara mechanical engineering diploma student and 2019 bootcamp alumnus, said the programme helped him immensely.

“It exposed me to the engineering field. I could apply the coding skills that I learnt from the bootcamp in my studies.

“For example, in my Artificial Intelligence coursework, I am required to code to effectively train processors for deep learning,” said Alif.

Currently pursuing aBuilding Services Engineering diploma at Politeknik Shah Alam, Nor Elyas Norazmi, 19, said the intensive electronics curriculum allowed him to get a headstart in his studies.

“At last year’s bootcamp, I built a prototype where I used a PCB as a smoke detector. My current diploma programme includes a topic on fire detection systems. The invaluable knowledge that I gained from the bootcamp helped me to understand the topic easier.

“This bootcamp also introduces students to future study and career prospects,” said Nor Elyas.

Meanwhile, fellow alumnus and Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia student Muhammad Arif Najmi Abdul Rahim, 19, decided to pursue actuarial science. However, he valued the network and guidance he gained from the bootcamp greatly.

“I was interested in physics and math and I was introduced to financial engineering, an engineering field that’s similar to actuarial science.

“I hope more students can join thisbootcamp. The knowledge can be shared on a larger scale,” he said.

PKAS director Dr Kalaivani Chellappan said 60 per cent of the bootcamp syllabus is based on electronics.

“This programme was developed by integrating aspects of design thinking, which is a pillar of Industry 4.0 and a combination of Google web and analytics applications.

“We use an interdisciplinary approach and experience-based learning pedagogy that will stimulate students’ interest to improve knowledge, skills andvalues.”

For this year, 125 applications were received from across the country, she said.

“While the programme is open to all SPM leavers, we have some criteria in place, namely, family background, academic achievement, financial status and psychometric assessment. Participants are fully funded by PKAS, except for accommodation, for the T20 community.”

Kalaivani added that research universities are the frontrunners in nurturing more knowledgeable citizens.

“I believe research universities need to build the interest and identify potential students in the field of research from the school level. This is important in facing Industry 4.0 or 5.0 challenges.

“Through this platform, we hope to generate more quality human capital, especially in the field of IoT, automation, healthcare, education and industrial security.”

by Rayyan Rafidi.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2020/03/572279/early-exposure-stem-degrees

Discover the endless possibilities of STEM the Curve

Monday, March 9th, 2020

AS Malaysia is in need of more experts in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields, it is important to introduce exciting programmes to children from an early age to cultivate a strong passion and interest in the subjects.

With the school holidays fast approaching, it’s the perfect time for kids to immerse themselves in an enjoyable and educational STEM experience at the Curve, in Mutiara Damansara, Selangor.

From March 13 to 22, the mall’s centre court will be transformed into a science haven filled with various clusters and activities to invoke fun and enthusiasm among visitors from all walks of life.

The STEM Fest will feature four clusters focusing on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics and each exhibit will have various STEM-related showcases and activities, appealing to a wide range of interests.

Curious about forensic science or maybe the key to solving the Rubik’s cube? These will be among the many topics patrons can learn from the various clusters.

To give visitors a multi-sensorial experience, 30 STEM exhibitors will display and share various interactive exhibits ranging from robotics, coding, science demonstrations and even virtual reality.

All visitors can touch, feel and toy around with the displayed exhibitions! If you’re a fan of science experiments, then look no further and witness the Magic of Science – a showcase of science experiments live on stage. Don’t miss the show which will take place every weekend at the centre court.

For those seeking an adventurous thrill, be sure to visit the Aerospace and Drone showcase, where shoppers can try their hand at operating and flying a drone.

Besides that, you can also put your STEM knowledge to the test and participate in the STEM Explorace. Those who are interested may spend a minimum of RM50 in a maximum of two receipts to join the STEM Explorace.

“We believe it is important to expose children to the various fields of study, especially the vast field of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, from a young age. Through our STEM Fest, we hope to provide a fun learning experience to children and give them an opportunity to explore, discover and learn more about interesting topics in the STEM field!” said Curve senior general manager Jazmi Kamarudin.

Find out more about the STEM Fest by contacting the Curve’s customer care officers at 03-7710 6868 or visit www.thecurve.com.mywww.facebook.com/theCurveShoppingMall or https://www.instagram.com/thecurve_official/ (thecurve_official).

REad more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2020/03/08/discover-the-endless-possibilities-of-stem-the-curve

Focus on science for PISA 2024

Monday, March 2nd, 2020

OXFORD University Press (OUP), the world’s largest university press with a distinguished global presence, through its subsidiary, Oxford Fajar in Malaysia, said it has won a competitive tender by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to develop the Science Framework for the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2024.

The OECD’s PISA is widely acknowledged as the benchmark for evaluating education systems across the world, examining students’ knowledge of mathematics, reading and science. It provides a comprehensive international assessment of the skills 15-year-old students need in order to further academic education prior to entering the workforce.

In line with the Malaysia Education Blueprint 2013-2025 to position Malaysia in the top one-third of countries, the framework developed by OUP will help define the design, development and implementation of the tests and questionnaires used in PISA 2024, determining what is measured and how findings will be reported. This approach will help to establish a clear vision and aspirations for individual students.

The main objectives of this work include:

* Focusing on how Science is applied in a real-life context and within levels of Scientific literacy;

* Ensuring the framework is relevant and reflects the current state of academic research in Science and Science Education; and

* Making links between the content from previous cycles of PISA and the understanding of Science that young people will need in the future.

PISA is conducted every three years using representative national sampling from over 80 participating countries.

PISA 2018 saw 600,000 students across 79 countries and economies take part, representing 32 million 15-year old students globally, and similar or greater numbers are expected in 2024.

OUP managing director of education, Fathima Dada, said: “We’re thrilled to have been selected to conduct this work.”

“PISA is considered the global barometer of education, ” she said.

OECD PISA programme head Andreas Schleicher, said OUP is renowned for its understanding of pedagogy, assessment and provision of educational resources in most countries across the globe.

“I am pleased to be working with OUP on an ambitious new and forward-looking PISA science framework, ” he added.

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2020/03/01/focus-on-science-for-pisa-2024

Advice to those resisting the use of English

Sunday, February 16th, 2020

The move to teach Science and Mathematics in English should be lauded and supported by all stakeholders.

As Malaysians who desire world-class knowledge, we cannot deny that technological advancements are built upon the “basic blocks” that are structured in English. The government should not be distracted by naysayers who cast doubts about the move.

Teething problems are inevitable whenever new policies are implemented. To throw in the towel even before attempting it is an inwardlooking way of looking at things. Fear should not be allowed to take control of any decision making process.

We can be nationalistic and patriotic even while we acknowledge the capable qualities of other civilisations.

We need to accept the fact that although all cars run on four wheels, there are some cars that are capable of going up steep slopes faster. The occupants of such cars will reach the summit earlier.

This is just an analogy to reflect upon by those who are resisting the use of English in the teaching of Mathematics and Science. We need to embrace a broader view to help our society reach the global platform faster.

The world is moving rapidly in acquiring artificial intelligence and digital technology.We need to fearlessly embrace the “building blocks” in which they are founded. These building blocks are undoubtedly Science and Mathematics.

We also need to think about creating global employment opportunities in this era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

The time is now. If the Wright brothers had waited for the right conditions by “treading carefully”, they wouldn’t have invented the first flying machines.

by Dr Z Measias John.

Read more @ http://www.dailyexpress.com.my/read/3529/advice-to-those-resisting-the-use-of-english/

Adopt education systems that are successful

Monday, February 10th, 2020
I REFER to the articles, “Teachers: No more u-turns on PPSMI and we’re on board” & “We’re not totally against it” (The Star, Feb 4).

Since the Prime Minister announced the reintroduction of the Teaching and Learning of Science and Maths in English policy (or better known by its Malay acronym, PPSMI), there has been numerous responses from practically all sectors: politicians in particular, educationists, academia, parents and even the man on the street.

My humble suggestion is that we should logically adopt whatever education system that has consistently been proven to be successful, using internationally recognised yardsticks such as the Programme for International Assessment (PISA), which is intended to measure and evaluate educational systems.

We don’t need rocket science to introduce a world class education for our country. Still we can seek the opinions of our local professors and education experts from our country’s universities. Only last year one public university was able to produce around 650 PhD graduates with doctorate degrees – a record number by any standard.

We just need to be realistic to get the best education system for our students. In this respect, Singapore’s education system has been consistently ranked among the best in the world. It has been benchmarked by many countries to successfully produce a society that is united as well as competitive to face whatever global challenges particularly in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects, in order to prepare the younger generation for the Industrial Revolution (IR4) and digital world, especially in Artificial Intelligence (AI).

Much as we would like to deny it, the fact remains that Singapore’s formula to success in education is largely due to adopting English as the medium of instruction in schools. Truly, it is not only a necessary step but it is also long overdue before our neighbouring countries catch up with us.

Since independence till the mid 1970s, we had embraced English medium schools. The Education Ministry then adopted Bahasa Melayu (BM) as the medium of instruction until today.

The authorities have fortunately allowed the setting up of independent and international schools that use English to teach all subjects except the vernacular languages. Sadly, these schools impose high fees which inevitably cater for the rich and upper middle classes. The rest who cannot afford these fees send their children to national schools, where BM is the medium of instruction.

Thankfully, our Prime Minister through his wisdom and experience has called for the return of PPSMI. We hope the Prime Minister will revive the English-medium schools so that everyone will benefit from it.

Under no circumstances is BM ignored. BM must remain a compulsory pass for any level of exams (UPSR, PT3 and SPM). In fact the grade should be raised to a credit as BM is an unshakable unifying force in our multi-racial and multi-religious nation.

Can English medium schools be set up under the umbrella of the national-type schools?:

Supposing the PM gives the green light, the English schools or national-type English-medium schools will surely be the preferred choice of most parents. I believe even many students from Chinese and Tamil vernacular schools will flock to these English-medium schools.

English schools, moreover, will invariably be our country’s main revenue earner, attracting students from neighbouring countries such as China, Japan and South Korea as well, which is a win-win end-game for all.

by THOMAS KOK.

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2020/02/09/adopt-education-systems-that-are-successful

Cast aside doubts and implement use of English for Science, Maths

Wednesday, February 5th, 2020
The move to teach Science and Mathematics in English should be lauded and supported by all stakeholders. – NSTP file pic

LETTERS: The move to teach Science and Mathematics in English should be lauded and supported by all stakeholders.

As Malaysians who desire world-class knowledge, we cannot deny that technological advancements are built upon the “basic blocks” that are structured in English.

The government should not be distracted by naysayers who cast doubts about the move. Teething problems are inevitable whenever new policies are implemented.

To throw in the towel even before attempting it is an inwardlooking way of looking at things. Fear should not be allowed to take control of any decision making process.

We can be nationalistic and patriotic even while we acknowledge the capable qualities of other civilisations.

We need to accept the fact that although all cars run on four wheels, there are some cars that are capable of going up steep slopes faster.

The occupants of such cars will reach the summit earlier. This is just an analogy to reflect upon by those who are resisting the use of English in the teaching of Mathematics and Science.

We need to embrace a broader view to help our society reach the global platform faster. The world is moving rapidly in acquiring artificial intelligence and digital technology.

We need to fearlessly embrace the “building blocks” in which they are founded. These building blocks are undoubtedly Science and Mathematics.

We also need to think about creating global employment opportunities in this era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

The time is now. If the Wright brothers had waited for the right conditions by “treading carefully”, they wouldn’t have invented the first flying machines.

by DR Z. MEASIAS JOHN

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2020/02/562624/cast-aside-doubts-and-implement-use-english-science-maths

Second chance for education in M’sia

Tuesday, February 4th, 2020

When the teaching of Science and Mathematics in English was introduced in 2003, our columnist didn’t think it was a great move. He now has a different take and he also has suggestions on how to do it better.

AS acting Education Minister, Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad announced last week that he would be reinstating his idea of teaching Science and Mathematics in English. Unlike how I felt about his first attempt in the first decade of the new century, I am giving full support to this idea, although not for the same reason that he has in mind.

Dr Mahathir feels that teaching both subjects in English would better prepare students for the professional fields at the global level. I agree with him in some ways but what is more important, I think, is that this change in the language of instruction can actually help this nation deal with the worsening racial and religious ties.

In this article, I will explain my change of perspective and also outline what I think would be a better strategy to make this new policy a success.

When Dr Mahathir announced this policy, known then and now as the PPSMI (the Malay acronym for Teaching and Learning of Science and Maths in English), I was most sceptical.

First, the move happened just after the sacking and incarceration of Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim and the start of the Reformasi movement. At that time, members were leaving Umno in droves and Barisan Nasional was propped up largely by the non-Malays.

I concluded that Dr Mahathir introduced the PPSMI as a political move to threaten the Malays regarding the sanctity of their language and to signal the strong support of the non-Malays. However, the policy slowly but surely became a failure for several reasons.

So why have I changed my view on the PPSMI and now support it fully?

Two things. One is that the public universities, for better or for worse, began to implement English as the main medium of instruction.

Even Universiti Teknologi Mara got on board. It made no sense at all to keep instructing students at schools in Malay when they would eventually end up in a private or public university that used English as the main medium of instruction.

The other thing that changed my perspective was an incident at an interfaith forum.

An elderly Malay man stood up and said, “We have race and religious conflict because our children don’t know English, especially the Malay children. With only Malay as the main language of instruction, the Malays are restricted to only reading books and other things in Malay and watching Malay television programmes.

“If they knew more English, then they would be able to access a world of information and knowledge and not be shocked about Christmas

or Christianity or Buddhism and whatnot. I think the key to mutual understanding and tolerance between religions is English.”

After the forum, I thought about my childhood, when I read Enid Blyton books and Archie comics and watched Scooby-Doo cartoons and the Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea series on black and white TV.

What that man said at the forum was true. Without English, the Malays and other races instructed in their own mother tongue are likely to become narrow-minded. English is the key to nation-building and global co-existence.

One primary reason for the initial failure of the PPSMI was its implementation at both Year One and Form One.

At the primary school level, it was okay but at the secondary school level, it was a complete disaster.

The teachers were ill-prepared and it was impossible to be ready at such a short notice for an advanced level of Science and Mathematics.

In addition, the Education Ministry adopted what I consider a flawed solution of appointing a private company to oversee the training of teachers.

People from Europe and the US were hired with high salaries. But they merely echoed what I had always said: Do more reading in English.

For the success of this second attempt, I wish to outline several strategies.

The first is to implement this policy next year, not immediately. The second is to restrict it to Years One to Three. Third, the subjects of Science and Mathematics should not be examinable yet until the children reach Year Four.

Fourth, for 2020,1, 000 teachers must be sent out to 200 private and international schools that have instruction in English so that the teachers are forced to immerse themselves in English conversations. These teachers can act as assistant teachers but are still fully paid by the government.

They must also be monitored by a body of senior instructors or mentors so that they are given reading assignments of children-level English books throughout that year.

They should read at least 30 children storybooks.

For the fifth strategy, veteran teachers who have retired and can speak English well can be offered part-time teaching to replace the teachers who are seconded to private schools for a year.

The sixth strategy is the most important.

The Education Ministry must hire teachers from our pool of graduates of private universities who have excellent command of English.

At the moment, the ministry only recognises graduates of public universities for teaching jobs although some of them are poor in English.

I have met several Universiti Malaya and Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris graduates who are teachers of English but can’t converse at all with me in English!

My son, Ibrahim, graduated from a private university’s English for Corporate Communication programme but can’t apply to be a teacher in public schools.

His degree is not recognised and he is now a senior executive at an NGO writing minutes of meetings and articles.

My daughter, Khadija, graduated with a degree in psychology after doing a twinning programme with an American university.

I sent her to the US for six months to complete a semester at the parent university. She is now completing her Open University post-graduate diploma in teaching. But she was told that her qualification is not recognised by the Education Ministry for teaching at public schools. She currently teaches Arab children at an international school.

I sincerely hope that when hiring teachers, the government will no longer overlook good Malaysian students who can speak and write well in English. Stop this preference for public university graduates, even though some have a weak grasp of English, and recruit people who can actually converse intelligently and write proficiently.

For our children’s future as global contributors and as citizens of Malaysia that accept all religions and cultures with an open mind, I do hope that this initiative by Dr Mahathir can be the turning point for our nation mired in race and religious tension arising from mass ignorance and poor English.

Prof Dr Mohd Tajuddin Mohd Rasdi is Professor of Architecture at UCSI University. The views expressed here are entirely the writer’s own.

By Prof Dr Mohd Tajuddin Mohd Rasdi.

Read more @ hestar.com.my/opinion/columnists/over-the-top/2020/02/04/second-chance-for-education-in-msia

Back to English for Science and Maths

Tuesday, February 4th, 2020

Dr Mahathir says it is very important that we give time for English particularly in the learning of Science and Maths.

ENGLISH will again be used to teach Science and Maths.

Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, who is also the acting Education Minister, said the use of English and its mastery in our education system must be promoted.

“It is very important that we give time for English particularly in the learning of Science and Maths.

“Geography and History can come in any language but Maths and Science are not indigenous fields of knowledge (to us). It comes from abroad.

“And most of it comes to us in English therefore we are going to use English in the teaching of Science and Maths, ” he said, adding that those who studied Science in Bahasa Melayu later found it difficult to work where English was required.

He was speaking during a special meeting with Education Ministry management officials on Thursday. A video of his address was later uploaded on social media.

In 2003, under Dr Mahathir’s first tenure as prime minister, the Teaching and Learning of Science and Maths in English policy (or better known by its Malay acronym, PPSMI), was introduced in phases, beginning with Year One, Form One and Lower Six students.

The reversal of the PPSMI policy was made in 2009 “based on what’s best for the people and country as the ministry has enough data on its implementation, outcome and assessment”, the ministry said.

In 2011, it was announced that students who have started learning Science and Maths in English would continue to do so until they completed their studies in Form Five.

The PPSMI was completely abolished in 2013, only to be replaced by the Dual Language Programme (DLP), which was announced during Budget 2016.

The DLP allows selected schools to teach Mathematics and Science in English.

Dr Mahathir said the country and rakyat want to see reforms in the education system.

“I have ideas for the role of education in the country and towards this end, certain weaknesses have to be attended to.

“I wish to put my views on record so that we can work together to achieve it.

“Of course my views are not always popular or acceptable to many people but I feel we have to push certain things so that our children grow up and are able to tackle the problems of adult life – that is the purpose of education.”

He said being a multi-racial country posed some problems for us but it can also contribute to the nation’s development.

Much of Malaysia’s development is based on the good working relationship between the races, he said.

Parent Action Group for Education Malaysia (PAGE) chairman Datin Noor Azimah Abdul Rahim hopes Dr Mahathir’s wish for Science and Maths to be taught in English, will be respected.

She said for Malaysians to have better quality of life and to be a model nation, we need scientists and engineers to move the economy forward.

The National Union of the Teaching Profession (NUTP) and Melaka Action Group for Parents in Education (Magpie) also welcomed the move.

However, parents and teachers are weary of another policy flip-flop. They want Dr Mahathir to ensure that all resources are in place so that the implementation of the language policy will be successful this time around.

The availability of teaching and learning materials, and teachers who are proficient in English, are crucial.

NUTP secretary-general Harry Tan said the ministry would have to “tread carefully” to ensure that the policy was truly for the betterment of society.

The PPSMI, he said, had been problematic for over a decade of its implementation.

From teachers who were neither proficient nor motivated to teach, to the difficulty in sourcing for textbooks, PPSMI was plagued with problems.

“Incentives were given to teachers but this gave rise to many who only wanted to teach for the sake of the incentives.

“A ‘soft landing’ approach was then introduced before PPSMI was finally abolished, ” he said, adding that the DLP, which replaced PPSMI, is a good policy as it gives parents an option whether to let their children learn Maths and Science in English or Bahasa Melayu.

“Unfortunately, like PPSMI, the DLP is also fraught with many similar problems.

“There are still not enough teachers who are proficient enough to teach these subjects in English. And, there aren’t enough DLP classes to cater to those who want to learn in English.”

He said these problems were made worse by the fact that those in charge are either powerless to address the issues, or they are just not interested in seeing the programme succeed as they themselves are not proficient in English.

“Hopefully the Prime Minister can look into this.”

Magpie chairman Mak Chee Kin said although the move may not be politically popular, it is for the best of our children.

He said the first step now should be to encourage more schools to adopt the DLP.

MIC Education Bureau Chairman and Central Working Committee member Datuk P Kamalanathan said a comprehensive study on why the policy was reversed must be carried out and can only be implemented when all shortcomings are overcome.

“Engagement with the stakeholders is vital to ensure they see the policy relevance and embrace the change as this would be key in making it a success, ” said the former deputy education minister.

By CHRISTINA CHIN

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2020/02/02/back-to-english-for-science-and-maths

DPM: Decision on PPSMI not finalised yet

Sunday, February 2nd, 2020
“(The implementation of PPSMI) is at the preliminary discussion level. The decision has not been finalised,” Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Seri Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail told reporters here today after attending the Hokkien Klang Association Chinese New Year celebration. – NSTP/SYARAFIQ ABD SAMAD

KLANG: The decision to teach Science and Mathematics in English has yet to be finalised.

Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Seri Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail said discussion over the reintroduction of the teaching of Mathematics and Science in English (PPSMI) was still in the preliminary stage.

“(The implementation of PPSMI) is at the preliminary discussion level. The decision has not been finalised,” she told reporters here today after attending the Hokkien Klang Association Chinese New Year celebration.

PPSMI was introduced during the 2003 school session to all students of Year One in primary school and Form One at the secondary level.

It was fully implemented in all secondary schools in 2007 and primary schools in 2008 before it was eventually abolished in 2013.

The decision to teach Science and Mathematics in English has yet to be finalised. – NSTP/ASYRAF HAMZAH

Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, who is also the acting education minister, had on Jan 31 said Science and Mathematics would once again be taught in English.

The move, he said, would allow for better mastery of the language

Dr Mahathir said it was found that those who studied Science in Bahasa Malaysia were unable to apply it in their work where English was required.

A video of Dr Mahathir’s address was uploaded to his Facebook and Twitter accounts. However, there was no mention of when exactly the move would be implemented.

By Tharanya Arumugam

Anwar: Cabinet should discuss teaching of Science, Maths in English

Saturday, February 1st, 2020
The issue of Science and Mathematics being taught in English in schools should be left to Cabinet to discuss and decide upon, said PKR president Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim. – NSTP/DANIAL SAAD

GEORGE TOWN: The issue of Science and Mathematics being taught in English in schools should be left to Cabinet to discuss and decide upon, said PKR president Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim.

PKR had vigorously objected to the teaching of the two subjects in English in the past.

In 2009, Anwar – who was then de facto PKR leader – had explicitly asked the Barisan Nasional administration to abolish the teaching of Science and Mathematics in English.

“Let them discuss this in Cabinet”, he said when met at the national-level PKR Chinese New Year open house here, last night.

Earlier on Friday, Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad announced that

Science and Mathematics will once again be taught in English.

Dr Mahathir, who is also Acting Education Minister, said the move would allow for a better mastery of the language.

PKR secretary-general Datuk Seri Saifuddin Nasution Ismail, who was present at the same event, said that PKR will discuss the matter at the party level soon.

“We meet weekly. So we will raise this issue at the next meeting,” he said.

The teaching of Mathematics and Science in English (PPSMI) was introduced during the 2003 school session to all students of Year One in primary schools, and Form One at the secondary level.

PPSMI was fully implemented for all secondary school students in 2007 and primary school students in 2008, before it was abolished in 2013.

By Audrey Dermawan.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2020/02/561508/anwar-cabinet-should-discuss-teaching-science-maths-englis