Archive for the ‘Environmental Education’ Category

2020 National Environment Day highlights electrical, electronic waste disposal

Thursday, September 24th, 2020

Tuan Ibrahim takes a closer look at an aircraft fire extinguisher at one of the exhibition booth. — Bernama photo

PUTRAJAYA: The National Environment Day 2020 celebration will take place in the new normal and highlight key messages on proper disposal of electrical and electronic waste, and reducing the use of plastics.

Minister of Environment and Water, Datuk Seri Tuan Ibrahim Tuan Man said about 35 programmes including online had been drawn up in conjunction with the National Environment Day this year themed, ‘Alam Sekitar Tanggungjawab Bersama’ (Environment A Shared Responsibility), which is celebrated on Oct 21 each year.

“Among the activities planned are webinars themed, environmental sustainability, the National River Trail programme, Avoid Single-Use Plastic campaign, and interviews on the environment via television, radio and social media.

“The National Environment Day celebration marks the government’s commitment to protect the ozone layer,” Tuan Ibrahim told the media after officiating at the World Ozone Day 2020 celebration and pre-launch of National Environment Day 2020 here yesterday.

The launch this time will be on Oct 24 at Universiti Sains Malaysia in Kubang Kerian, Kelantan.

Tuan Ibrahim said from 2012 to 2040, Malaysia was working towards eliminating the use of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), the second-generation ozone depleting agents.

Based on phase one of the HCFC Phase-out Management Plan (HPMP), he said Malaysia managed to reduce the use of HCFCs by 19 per cent compared to the initial target of 10 per cent.

“Malaysia is currently in the second phase of the HPMP from 2017 to 2021. This year, Malaysia has reduced the use of HCFCs by 59 per cent compared to the target of 35 per cent.

“The government is drawing up several strategies to assist those industries still using HCFCs to alternatively use ozone-friendly technology,” he added.

by Bernama.

Read more @ https://www.theborneopost.com/2020/09/24/2020-national-environment-day-highlights-electrical-electronic-waste-disposal/

Monsoon transition phase to begin Thursday – MetMalaysia

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020

Malaysia is expected to go through the monsoon transition phase beginning Thursday (Sept 24) which will bring along thunderstorms, heavy rain and strong winds in a short period of time. – Bernama photo

KUALA LUMPUR (Sept 22): Malaysia is expected to go through the monsoon transition phase beginning Thursday (Sept 24) which will bring along thunderstorms, heavy rain and strong winds in a short period of time.

The Malaysian Meteorological Department (MetMalaysia) in a statement today said these weather conditions also have the potential to cause flash floods and damage to unstable infrastructures.

“During the monsoon transition phase, these weather conditions would occur in the evenings and early nights in most states on the west coast and the interior of the peninsula, west coast of Sabah as well as western and central parts of Sarawak,” said the statement.

The monsoon transition phase is expected to last until early November.

MetMalaysia said the beginning of the phase marked the end of the Southwest Monsoon which began on May 18 this year.

“During this period, the country will experience weak monsoon winds from various directions which are conducive for the formation of cumulonimbus clouds,” it said.

The public is advised to be vigilant during the monsoon transition phase and always take heed of the weather forecasts and warnings issued by MetMalaysia through its website, myCuaca mobile app, social media, RakanMet portal.

by Bernama.

Read more @ https://www.theborneopost.com/2020/09/22/monsoon-transition-phase-to-begin-thursday-metmalaysia/

Time to reassess water management system

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020
A flash flood inundated Kuala Lumpur recently. We need to ensure preventive measures are in place. - NSTP/File picA flash flood inundated Kuala Lumpur recently. We need to ensure preventive measures are in place. – NSTP/File pic

LETTER: Recently, Klang Valley saw two water-related issues: an unscheduled water disruption as a result of odour pollution in Sungai Gong and flash floods that overwhelmed areas in the heart of Kuala Lumpur.

Having both water issues happen within a week of each other shines a spotlight on the urgent need to reassess our water management system and ensure it is able to provide for the needs of those in the community in the long term.

In 2016, Akademi Sains Malaysia published a report titled “Transforming the Water Sector: National Integrated Water Resources Management Plan”, which provided a comprehensive assessment of our water sector and recommendations to safeguard this crucial resource.

The main recommendation was for states to set up an Integrated Water Resources Management plan. States will be able to integrate planning, monitoring, enforcement and management of water resources on a river-basin basis. This will not only improve response rates, but also serve as a preventive tool to ensure our water sources remain secure.

Enforcing reactive measures is justified when it concerns repeat offenders. However, the primary focus should be in ensuring that preventive measures are well in place within the framework as it will lead to a society that is aware of the impact of their actions.

Businesses should prove that they have mechanisms in place to ensure they are not discharging wastewater or effluents into waterways at the risk of inconveniencing those in the area.

Civil servants responsible for safeguarding our water supply should be empowered with technical and technological know-how to assess a business premises’ compliance level.

If anything, the water disruption has brought home the fact that we are heavily reliant on this natural resource to survive. Water is a vital ingredient — it is needed from residences to hospitals to businesses.

Managing the water sector is a joint responsibility of all — public and private sectors as well as communities — as it cuts across multiple sectors of land use management, multiple water agencies and governance.

by DR SALMAH ZAKARIA.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2020/09/626240/time-reassess-water-management-system

Time to implement ‘polluter pays’ principle

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020

This Sept 15 pic shows the four company directors and a workshop manager charged at the Selanyang Sessions Court. -NSTP/NURUL AMELIA ISHAKThis Sept 15 pic shows the four company directors and a workshop manager charged at the Selanyang Sessions Court. -NSTP/NURUL AMELIA ISHAK

Four company directors and a factory manager suspected of being responsible for dumping effluents into Sungai Gong, near Rawang, Selangor, appeared in court last Tuesday to answer charges under Section 430, read together with Section 34, of the Penal Code and Section 25(1) of the Environmental Quality Act 1974 (EQA).

They pleaded not guilty and the case was fixed for further mention on Oct 27. They were denied bail. The pollution incident caused the suspension of operations at four Sungai Selangor water treatment plants, disrupting water supply to 1,292 areas in the Klang Valley.

Expressing sadness for his subjects in the state, the sultan of Selangor asked for stricter enforcement measures to be put in place. He wanted “more stringent legislation” to be passed, containing heavier penalties for polluters of rivers and the environment, including mandatory jail terms and maximum fines. He also instructed that there should not be any “political interference” in enforcement matters pertaining to the pollution of the environment.

This is not the first time river pollution had caused a major disruption to water supply in Selangor. Unless immediate measures are put in place, it will not be the last. In 2016, river pollution had caused the Semenyih water treatment plant to be shut down four times, leading to a chaotic water disruption in Hulu Langat, Kuala Langat, Sepang and Petaling.

What distressed many in Selangor is that the illegal factory causing the pollution of Sungai Gong last week is actually a “repeat offender”, having been compounded RM60,000 in the past. According to recent news reports, the state government had given the landowner and factory operator until the end of this year “to put things right”.

This had led some quarters to question the reason for such “kid-glove treatment”. They asked: “Sudah 12 tahun pemilik kilang haram diberi masa, kenapa beri muka lagi kepada mereka?

It is still not too late for Malaysia to implement the “polluters pay” principle (PPP), under which a convicted polluter of the environment (including rivers) is required to pay a certain amount to the state to cover the cost of restoring the damaged environment to its former condition.

New South Wales in Australia had done so by establishing its Environment Protection Authority under its Protection of the Environment Administration Act 1991. The European Union did the same under a directive in 2004. France implemented it under Article 4 of its Charter for the Environment, while Ghana implemented it in 2011. England and Wales passed their respective Environmental Damage (Prevention and Remediation) Regulations in 2009.

Under the Zimbabwe Environmental Management Act 2002, any person convicted of environmental offences is required to bear the cost of decontaminating the polluted environment. The polluters pay principle is actually grounded in Principle 16 of the Rio Declaration on the Environment and Development 1992 (the Rio Declaration), to which Malaysia is a party.

But nothing concrete in implementing it has been done over the past three decades. In 2017, the then natural resources and environment minister, Datuk Seri Dr Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar, stated that the federal government intended to enact a new law, known as the Environmental Protection Act (EPA), to empower a federal department to act against polluters, including the power to demolish or relocate illegal factories.

He then explained that the pollution of Sungai Semenyih was caused by illegal factories, but federal agencies under his ministry were unable to do anything because the matter was under the jurisdiction of the local authorities. He told reporters the new law will solve cross-jurisdictional issues.

In May 2019, when the pollution of Sungai Kim Kim in Pasir Gudang caused water disruption that affected some 6,000 residents living in the area, the then minister in charge of the environment, Yeo Bee Yin, also said the federal government was considering a new law to replace the existing EQA, with a heavier penalty for polluters. Sadly, nothing has come from both promises.

To sum up — we have an old EQA waiting for reform. We have earlier announcements about a new EPA. We have local authorities who seem unable to cope with the magnitude and frequency of our river pollution problem.

We have a federal department, which (according to federal ministers) does not have jurisdiction to do anything about it. We made a solemn promise in Brazil in 1992 to implement PPP, but we have not done so.

By Salleh Buang.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2020/09/626244/time-implement-polluter-pays-principle

Anonymous donor gives 10-tonne truck to Sabah Wildlife Dept for elephant rescue

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020
 Sabah Wildlife Department director Augustine Tuuga (fourth right) receives key replica of Nissan 10-tonne truck from representatives of Tan Chong Motor. - -NSTP/Courtesy of Sabah Wildlife DepartmentSabah Wildlife Department director Augustine Tuuga (fourth right) receives key replica of Nissan 10-tonne truck from representatives of Tan Chong Motor. – -NSTP/Courtesy of Sabah Wildlife Department

PENAMPANG: The Sabah Wildlife Department (SWD) received a surprise asset boost when an anonymous individual donated a 10-tonne truck, to help in its efforts to save the Bornean elephants.

The Nissan truck, fully-equipped with an 8-ton crane, was handed over to the department director Augustine Tuuga by representatives of Tan Chong Motors at the Lok Kawi Wildlife Park, near here.

The truck is to be used for elephant rescue translocation. It was donated by an individual, who visited the Sepilok Orangutan Rahabilitation Centre two years ago.

Tuuga, in a statement, said human-elephant conflict in Sabah threatened the survival of the Bornean elephants, thus translocating `problem-elephants’ has become an important human-elephant conflict mitigation step.

“If the need really arises in translocating problem-elephants, it is essentially a move to capture it by drug immobilisation, transportation by truck and release to a protected area.

“Therefore, it is crucial that the department has enough experienced staff and a good truck equipped with a heavy-duty crane to lift a 6 to 9 foot elephant, weighing about more than 2-tonne without the help of an excavator.

“At present, the department has one very old and heavily used 22 year old truck which made it difficult to provide immediate assistance when needed,” he said.

Tuuga noted there have been several occasions when elephant translocating process had to be delayed due to poor condition of the existing truck.

He then extended the Sabah Wildlife Department appreciation to the anonymous donor for the gift which would only go towards improving Sabah’s conservation effort.

By Avila Geraldine.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2020/09/626196/anonymous-donor-gives-10-tonne-truck-sabah-wildlife-dept-elephant-rescue

As Asia’s 2nd-biggest plastics user, Msia urged to tackle pollution crisis

Monday, September 21st, 2020
A 2019 study commissioned by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) showed that Malaysia ranks second in Asia for annual per capita plastic use.  - NSTP file picA 2019 study commissioned by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) showed that Malaysia ranks second in Asia for annual per capita plastic use. – NSTP file pic

KUALA LUMPUR: A 2019 study commissioned by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) showed that Malaysia ranks second in Asia for annual per capita plastic use.

At 16.78kg per person, Malaysians outrank much larger nations, including China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam in overall generated waste.

WWF-Malaysia today released a report addressing the need for a proper plastic waste management system to tackle the worrying issue.

According to WWF-Malaysia’s lead for the sustainable markets programme Dr Adrian Choo, the report shows that the country has sufficient infrastructure to process large quantities of recycled waste materials.

“However, instead of processing and recycling waste produced in the country, a majority of the recyclers and aggregators import recyclables.

“This is attributed to the absence of systematic separation and recycling of the low-value recyclables, which include multilayer packaging and mixed plastics.

“As a result, and depending on the locally prevailing collection and disposal system, potential recycled materials end up in sanitary landfills and dumpsites, or are littered in the environment, eventually leaking into the ocean,” Choo said in a statement, today.

Sixty years after the first piece of plastic made from fossil fuels was invented, plastic pollution has now become a global crisis.

Plastic pollution worldwide has reached alarming levels, causing serious consequences to marine life and the wellbeing of societies along coastlines.

Approximately 4.8 to 12.7 million tonnes of plastics are entering the ocean yearly, of which the vast majority leaks into the Indian and Pacific oceans, where many coastal-lands and countries are located.

Under current trends, the volume of plastic waste will increase four times between 2010 and 2050 – meaning that, by weight, the ocean could contain more plastic than fish.

Despite the government’s revelations on the shocking figures of waste generated each year, the recycling rate of post-consumption plastic packaging among Malaysians is still relatively low, he said.

Choo said the non-governmental organisation’s findings have identified an Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) scheme as a critical and effective policy tool.

“With EPR as a policy tool, it could be used against manufacturers and hold them accountable for the end-of-life impacts of their plastic products and packaging, which will indirectly encourage the adoption of holistic eco-designs among the business sector.

“We believe that the first step is to have a mandatory scheme to provide a financial basis for large-scale systematic collection, sorting and recycling of packaging materials.

“For this customised EPR scheme to work, our findings emphasise that the responsibility of implementing the scheme to be assumed by a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organisation (PRO) as the system operator, with strict monitoring and control systems carried out by the government.

“However there is nothing unusual or new about the EPR scheme. Governments of several low and middle-income countries have started to introduce or draft regulations on EPR.

“Companies and business associations have also launched voluntary commitments and initiatives based on EPR schemes to accelerate the transition to sustainable waste management and circular economy.

“However, an effective EPR scheme must be designed and tailored to the existing waste management system and flow of recyclable materials,” said Choo.

Supporting the findings, Choo said the Environment and Water Ministry (Kasa) is taking the lead in various initiatives with stakeholders along the plastic value chain to shape a circular plastics economy.

“One of the steps taken by the ministry is by building a national plastics collaboration network, which is regarded as one of the key platforms to advance the implementation of an EPR scheme.

“The EPR scheme can also be built upon Malaysia’s Roadmap towards Zero Single-Use Plastics 2018-2030 to reduce plastic c

onsumption and waste, as well as a Circular Economy Roadmap for plastics.

“Ultimately, we need an EPR legal framework that outlines clear objectives, responsibilities, enforcement mechanisms, and a timeline for implementation.

“EPR complements other environmental regulations such as shifting to a circular economy, promoting eco-design, and transitioning to a more resource-efficient economy,” Choo concluded.

By Farah Solhi.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2020/09/626072/asias-2nd-biggest-plastics-user-msia-urged-tackle-pollution-crisis

World off the mark in meeting biodiversity targets

Saturday, September 19th, 2020
About two thirds of the world’s animals have vanished over the last 50 years, a WWF report said last week. Tigers have also become an endangered species. - File picAbout two thirds of the world’s animals have vanished over the last 50 years, a WWF report said last week. Tigers have also become an endangered species. – File pic

ALL the world’s governments have fallen short on pledges made a decade ago to protect wildlife, though cases of conservation show that the destruction of nature can be slowed, and even reversed, according to a United Nations report — the Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO5) — published on Tuesday.

It found that the world had largely failed to meet the 20 different targets to safeguard species and ecosystems. Just six were “partially achieved”.

The UN team and report authors said the study was meant to galvanise governments to take stronger actions over the next decade to protect the diversity of life.

Last year, the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) said a million species were at risk of extinction unless countries prioritised conservation.

About two thirds of the world’s animals have vanished over the last 50 years, a World Wildlife Fund (WWF) report said last week. Malaysia has its share of sad stories.

Recently, Malayan tigers, which numbered 3,000 in the 1950s, have been classified as a critically endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, with fewer than 200 left in the wild today.

And how could we forget the news last November of the demise of the last Sumatran rhino in Malaysia due to cancer. The Sumatran rhino is the smallest of the rhinoceros’ species and once roamed across Asia as far as India, but their numbers shrunk drastically due to deforestation and poaching.

The WWF conservation group estimated that there were only about 80 left, mostly in Sumatra. With countries due to meet for a UN summit on biodiversity on Sept 30, and another next year in China, at which a new framework for managing nature for the remainder of this decade will be set, the GBO5 report underlines the need not just for stronger commitments in stemming a precipitous decline in wildlife, but also in seeing them through.

There is a major push being made for governments to collectively set aside 30 per cent of the planet’s land and sea areas for conservation, led by the global Campaign for Nature.

Currently, about 17 per cent of the world’s land falls into areas that receive some form of protection. The figure is more dismal for the marine and coastal areas. Scientists have said the world may need more than 30 per cent to survive, if not thrive.

However, the GBO5 report was not without bright spots. For example, the endangered Japanese crested ibis, which almost vanished, started to produce chicks in the wild after conservationists released captivebred birds.

In Pakistan, a programme is protecting the snow leopard by conserving Himalayan ecosystems.

In Malawi, a community-based project is replanting the Mulanje cedar, prized for its aromatic wood and resistance to termites and fungal diseases.

Another sign of progress is that while global deforestation was not reduced by at least 50 per cent, it did slow by a third over the last 10 years relative to previous decade.

And while a third of marine fish stocks were over fished, a higher proportion than a decade ago, stocks have bounced back quickly in areas where protections were put in place.

“We also see that governments have made efforts. And where they make those efforts, they deliver results—and that’s where we get some hope,” said David Cooper, lead author of GBO5 and deputy executive secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Without conservation efforts, the number of bird and mammal extinctions would probably have been at least twice as high during the 10-year life of the pact, the report said.

Concerns over the impact of industrial society on the natural world has escalated amid the Covid-19 pandemic, caused by a coronavirus that likely jumped from bats to humans in China.

The destruction of wild spaces increases the risk of other, possibly worse diseases emerging. If this was a school and these were tests, the world has flunked, said Elizabeth Maruma Mrema, executive secretary of the CBD which released the report.

Inger Andersen, Executive Director of the UN Environment Programme, warned that, “from Covid-19 to massive wildfires, floods, melting glaciers and unprecedented heat, our failure to meet the Aichi Targets to protect our home has very real consequences. We can no longer afford to cast nature to the side. Now is the time for a massive step up, conserving, restoring and using biodiversity fairly and sustainably.”

By Zakri Abdul Hamid.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2020/09/625600/world-mark-meeting-biodiversity-targets

Time to change mindset on how we treat our rivers

Saturday, September 19th, 2020
An estimated 2,200 tonnes of rubbish are dumped into Malaysian waterways every month. - NSTP file picAn estimated 2,200 tonnes of rubbish are dumped into Malaysian waterways every month. – NSTP file pic

LETTERS: The importance of water to the sustainable livelihood of the community is evident. We abstract raw water from a river and treat it at the Water Treatment Plant (WTP) to become potable water which is then distributed for domestic, agricultural and industrial use. After it is transformed into wastewater, it is discharged into the river as effluent after treatment in a Sewage Treatment Plant (STP).

The cycle continues with the abstraction of water into the WTP. As the majority of the WTPs are located at the downstream of a river, the water used as raw water is essentially the diluted discharge from an STP located upstream.

Zooming into this micro-scale of the urban water cycle, the influence of public citizens is crucial in establishing sustainable water use. Way of life is the key here. How we can use potable water sustainably? Malaysians have been reported as one of the highest users of treated water, using up to 230l/cap.day, compared with our Asean neighbours who use an average 150l/cap.day.

Our daily activities of bathing, cooking, laundry and cleaning consume water directly. However, our water usage does not stop here. Our lifestyle significantly contributes to the water footprint, that is how much water is embedded in the products and goods we buy

For example, 1kg of rice uses 2,500l of water while a T-shirt and a pair of jeans together use a whopping 10,000l of water. Malaysians’ water footprint is reported to be at 2344m3/cap. a year, almost double that of the estimated global water footprint at 1240m3/cap a year. The high value of water footprint indicates a lavish lifestyle, both in terms of direct water consumption and consumerism.

Our domestic wastewater is mostly centralised, being conveyed from home to the STP through kilometres of sewage network pipes. The STPs are properly designed to remove organic and ammonia-based contaminants, where the effluent meets the stringent guidelines.

However, improper discharge of other contaminants such as industrial solvents and debris into the sewage network compromises the efficiency of STPs. Sungai Semenyih’s pollution due to the illegal scheduled waste discharge into the sewage manholes sparked controversy as the Semenyih WTP located downstream then needed to be shut down.

Appointed contractors should be more responsible. Taking the easy road by disposing them into the “unseen” sewage manholes is more tempting to save cost. Banking on our easy access to the Internet, public citizens can play an active role by immediately reporting any suspicious activity to the authorities.

Being a tropical country with an annual rainfall of 2500mm, giving a high surface runoff, Malaysia has multiple networks of rivers. Unfortunately, rivers in Malaysia, particularly the ones running through the cities, are heavily polluted, mostly visible with rubbish.

A scene of plastic bottles, boba cups and food containers is common for our river’s landscape (except for the inaccessible upstream rivers). An estimated 2,200 tonnes of rubbish are dumped into Malaysian waterways every month.

Despite numerous awareness campaigns and the knowledge that our treated water comes from the rivers, an easy way out of dumping straight into the rivers has become a habitual form of waste management.

Not limiting the issue solely to the rivers, we need to refrain ourselves from throwing rubbish from our cars, out of the kitchen window or while walking at the pasar malam as these will go into the drains and eventually flow into the rivers. The mentality of treating our land as a dumping ground needs to be changed.

Let us start by practising the simplest activity of keeping our waste properly managed within our homes. Separating the waste into two baskets of wet (kitchen) and dry (others) is the first step that can be adopted.

by WAN HANNA MELINI WAN MOHTAR.

Rea more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2020/09/625604/time-change-mindset-how-we-treat-our-rivers

New environmental crime prevention unit to go down hard on polluters

Thursday, September 17th, 2020
A general view of a polluted river in Kuala Lumpur. -NSTP/SHAHMI IMRAN

A general view of a polluted river in Kuala Lumpur. -NSTP/SHAHMI IMRAN

PUTRAJAYA: An elite environmental crime prevention unit comprising personnel from several government agencies is set to come down hard on polluters.

The unit is expected to be operational from October onwards said Environment and Water Minister Datuk Seri Tuan Ibrahim Tuan Man.

He said members of the elite unit would comprise personnel from the Department of Environment, National Water Services Commission (Span), Biosafety Department and the police.

“The ministry views the issue of pollution seriously. This needs to be addressed in a holistic and proactive approach.

“This was following the rampant pollution cases in Malaysia, with the latest incident at Sungai Gong, Selangor, has left a huge impact on the nation’s environment sustainability, country’s economy, as well as the health and wellbeing of the people,” he said in a press conference at his ministry on the formation of the unit, here today.

While the respective agencies have been carrying out monitoring and enforcement of existing laws, they were faced with limitations, he said.

Thus, he said, the ministry needed support in terms of logistics, forensic and intelligence expertise; enforcement as well as enhancement on relevant laws and scope of enforcement.

By Nuradzimmah Daim.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/government-public-policy/2020/09/624392/new-environmental-crime-prevention-unit-go-down-hard

New environmental crime prevention unit to go down hard on polluters

Monday, September 14th, 2020
A general view of a polluted river in Kuala Lumpur. -NSTP/SHAHMI IMRANA general view of a polluted river in Kuala Lumpur. -NSTP/SHAHMI IMRAN

PUTRAJAYA: An elite environmental crime prevention unit comprising personnel from several government agencies is set to come down hard on polluters.

The unit is expected to be operational from October onwards said Environment and Water Minister Datuk Seri Tuan Ibrahim Tuan Man.

He said members of the elite unit would comprise personnel from the Department of Environment, National Water Services Commission (Span), Biosafety Department and the police.

“The ministry views the issue of pollution seriously. This needs to be addressed in a holistic and proactive approach.

“This was following the rampant pollution cases in Malaysia, with the latest incident at Sungai Gong, Selangor, has left a huge impact on the nation’s environment sustainability, country’s economy, as well as the health and wellbeing of the people,” he said in a press conference at his ministry on the formation of the unit, here today.

While the respective agencies have been carrying out monitoring and enforcement of existing laws, they were faced with limitations, he said.

Thus, he said, the ministry needed support in terms of logistics, forensic and intelligence expertise; enforcement as well as enhancement on relevant laws and scope of enforcement.

By Nuradzimmah Daim.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/government-public-policy/2020/09/624392/new-environmental-crime-prevention-unit-go-down-hard