Archive for the ‘Colleges / Universities - Issues’ Category

Kamarudin appointed UMS vice-chancellor

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

KOTA KINABALU: Prof Dr D. Kamarudin D. Mudin will take over as the vice-chancellor of Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS) from June 18.

Kamaruddin, the university’s deputy vice-chancellor (Academic and International) will become its fifth vice-chancellor, succeeding Prof Datuk Dr Mohd Harun Abdullah whose term expires on June 17.

The appointment will make Dr Kamarudin, 49, the third Sabahan to hold the post after Prof Datuk Dr Kamaruzaman Ampon and Mohd Harun.

Dr Kamarudin is Professor Special Grade C (Medical) with expertise in the field of anaesthesiology. He served as dean of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences before being appointed as deputy vice-chancellor in April 2015.

by RUBEN SARIO.

Read more @ http://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2017/06/14/kamarudin-appointed-ums-vice-chancelor/

Benchmarking universities

Thursday, June 15th, 2017
Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh (second from right) sharing a light moment with (from left) Professor Datuk Dr Asma Ismail, Professor Datuk Dr Wahid Omar, Professor Datuk Seri Dr Noor Azlan Ghazali, Professor Datin Paduka Dr Aini Ideris and Professor Dr Awang Bulgiba Awang Mahmud. Looking on are Higher Education Deputy Minister Datuk Dr Mary Yap Kain Ching and Higher Education Ministry secretary-general Tan Sri Dr Noorul Ainur Mohd Nur. PIC BY MOHD FADLI HAMZAH
By ROZANA SANI - June 14, 2017 @ 2:23pm

STRENGTHENING fundamentals in teaching and learning as well as a keen focus on being more visible in the academic and industry circles are the key enabling factors for Malaysia’s five research universities to be placed in the top one per cent of the recently announced Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World University Rankings 2017/2018.

The strategy clearly paid off for University of Malaya (UM), Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) and Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) which are all in the top 300 band of the global ranking system involving 26,000 universities across the globe — with UM leading the pack at 114th position.

According to Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh, the achievement of the five universities is proof that the decision of establishing research universities 10 years ago to improve higher education through research, publication, citation and innovation has paid off.

“These continuous improvements in the rankings among the research universities is spurring and mentoring the whole higher education ecosystem into a more dynamic one. We will continue to encourage more collaborations and sharing of facilities and research as well as improve the students and lecturers’ mobility. Emphasis on translational research at universities is also benefiting the community at large and the nation,” he said at a press briefing in Putrajaya last week.

UM which have steadily risen year on year in its ranking from 167 in 2013 is now so close to being in the top 100 in the QS World University Rankings.

The university is ranked top in the nation for four indicators of the world rankings which are academic reputation, employer reputation, student to faculty ratio and citations per faculty.

Professor Awang Bulgiba Awang Mahmud, UM’s acting vice-chancellor, attributed the university’s current position to the success in the execution of UM’s strategic plan. The plan with the purpose of driving the university forward delivered positive impacts.

“We have been making certain changes to our strategic plan, one of which is tweaking our internationalisation efforts to be more focused and evidence driven so that we can best spend our resources,” he shared.

An example of this is making use of a network set up in UM last year focused on Disability and Public Policy under the auspices of the Asean University Network (AUN). AUN is a small network of 30 universities — top universities within the 10 countries in theAsean region.

“We can invite universities outside the AUN to join too because it is a thematic network. It is being funded by the Nippon Foundation for the first three years with support of US$600,000 per year. They have promised to further their support if we do well,” he said.

A few years ago, UM also offered to be the secretariat for the Asia-Pacific Academic Consortium for Public Health instantly making it the hub for 100 other universities. “Through efforts like this people then will get to know you and you gain visibility,” said Awang Bulgiba.

He said UM has 600 memoranda of understanding signed with universities around the world. “In truth, with the MOUs we collaborate with universities four times that number. Many are bottom up, not top down, with research proposals and activities from our researchers. This is a more sustainable model for the university and good for the long run,” he said.

The number of citations have also improved considerably for UM because of the collaborations. “International collaborations bring about greater citations,” said Awang Bulgiba. “In terms of publication, two years ago we were above the world average in terms of quality in about 14 categories as listed by Scorpus — the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature: scientific journals, books and conference proceedings. This year we went up to 18. We hope to cover all categories in the list by 2020.”

UPM which climbed 182 places from 411 in 2013/2014 to the current 229 in the QS World University Rankings 2017/2018 is delighted that it is inching closer and might even reach its target of being in the top 200 earlier than 2020.

“We have surpassed our targets so far. If we jump 30 steps next year, we will be within our target earlier by two years,” said UPM vice-chancellor Professor Datin Paduka Dr Aini Ideris.

She said UPM will again analyse the achievements and weaknesses it has made and see what it can do better and work harder especially in the area of citations.

“We strove as hard as we can on making fundamentals like teaching and learning solid. Our entire community ensures together this happens. Our visibility was not so clear before. So last year we concentrated on visibility through networking and participation in academic events and there is a rise in that area.

We have improved in the faculty and student ratio, academic and employer reputation. We have worked closely with the industry to bring them into campus, arrange attachments for students in selected good companies and we get good feedback from employers on our students,” she said.

UKM which saw the best improvement in rankings — moving up 72 places from 302 to 230 — with effort being placed on visibility and recognition.

“Our focus is clear — we are a university built on the aspiration of Malaysians at large. Our goal is to be a university that is referred to, relevant and respected. Ranking comes along the way. We don’t chase ranking as we want our academia to do the right thing academically. We want to impact society with our scholarly achievement. Our work touches all our stakeholders and we have UKM presence in terms of initiatives and projects in every State throughout the country,” said its vice-chancellor, Professor Datuk Seri Dr Noor Azlan Ghazali.

by ROZANA SANI.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/06/248818/benchmarking-universities

Work, Matters! : Remember that you are “selling” yourself, daily

Wednesday, June 14th, 2017
Work, Matters! : Remember that you are “selling” yourself, daily — Shankar R. Santhiram (File pix)

This past week, I have spent my working days at a leading private university in Malaysia.

This institution was established in 1969 by a team of educators to offer the Victorian High School Certificate (VHSC), the first Pre-University programme to secondary school leavers in Malaysia.

And over the past forty eight years, it has grown to become a premier private tertiary education centre. In 2010, it was awarded university status.

Out of one hundred and forty three colleges and universities in the world that participated in the iGraduate Survey in 2013, on student learning experience, this university emerged as the top institution in Malaysia. iGraduate tracks and benchmarks student, and stakeholder opinions, across the entire student journey, from prospective students to alumni.

Being as well established as it is, I was deeply honoured when I was asked to conduct a series of training programmes for their marketing and sales team on enhancing the customers’ experience.

I left university nearly twenty five years ago. And although I was the chief executive of an institution, it has been fifteen years since I moved to corporate consultancy, training and coaching. Being in that rambunctious environment, surrounded by young people who exhibit a palpable vibrancy, made me feel really young, again. It was a thoroughly enjoyable work week.

My focus with this team was to help them understand how they can increase their efficacy as marketers. My sessions aimed at equipping them with the necessary tools towards this end. But to start with, I directed my discussions with them on understanding how they need to market themselves first, effectively, before even promoting their educational services and products.

I explained to them that to live effectively in this competitive global village; to make your goals a reality; and to be real agents of change, you need to interact successfully with others. Marketing yourself is quite simply about learning to communicate why it is in the other person’s interest to interact with you.

It is about your effectiveness in honestly presenting your positive features, the ones that will enhance your relationships in a way that attracts the other person.

And just like selling anything else, when you market yourself, the “hard-sell” has very limited value. Your communication strategy has to be focused on what the listener will find interesting, and by engaging them through what they might be looking for.

Every successful entrepreneur will tell you that the way you speak, the way your walk, your appearance, and the way you carry yourself, all become part of your message. Both the tailored suit or the robust jeans and t-shirt combination, tell a story. Just be sure to decide from the onset, the story you want to tell.

On a daily basis, you need to “sell” the notion that you are a capable and trustworthy person, who will improve your company. You need to show without doubt that you can resolve problems for your employer, and elevate the status of your company.

Here are two most important ideas that I communicated to my trainees this week about how they can “sell” themselves.

Start by asking; what is the fundamental question that every employer wants answers to, at any interview?

“What can this person do for me”? This is the million-dollar question, is it not?

And what do you do at the interview? You will definitely craft the most impressive answer for that question, and you would have practiced the answer hundreds of times, before the interview.

At the interview, when asked, you would have promptly delivered a well-rehearsed narrative.

But to effectively position yourself at work, you need to answer this question daily. And, you are required to respond now, by your actions. You will need to exhibit your skills and abilities. The very same skills you highlighted in your resume, and at the interview. These are the abilities you claimed that you learnt through your work experiences, and education. They need to be apparent to your employer.

by SHANKAR R. SANTHIRAM.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2017/06/247168/work-matters-remember-you-are-selling-yourself-daily

More cross-border collaborations among top Malaysian universities on the cards

Wednesday, June 14th, 2017
There will be more cross-border collaborations among Malaysia’s top varsities to ensure that they remain among the world’s top 300 universities, said Higher Education Minister, Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh. (Pix by MOHD FADLI HAMZAH)

PUTRAJAYA: There will be more cross-border collaborations among Malaysia’s top varsities to ensure that they remain among the world’s top 300 universities, said Higher Education Minister, Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh.

“We will continue to improve our universities’ world ranking by having more cross-border collaborations. We will have sharing of facilities and research. We will also improve the students and lecturers’ mobility. It goes beyond the campus,” Idris told reporters during a press briefing on the latest Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World University Rankings at the ministry today.

The improved world ranking for top five local research universities have placed them in the Top one per cent research universities in the world, he announced, adding that Malaysian award-winning academic researchers are among the most sought after in the world.

Based on a global ranking system involving 26,000 research universities in the world, conducted by QS, topping the list as the best Malaysian research university is University of Malaya (UM) – currently ranked 114 in the world.

“UM is getting close to becoming the top 100 research universities in the world. This is good news to us since we introduced the research university initiatives in Malaysia 10 years ago,” he said.

Joining UM in the world rankings are Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) and Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM).

“Between 2007 to 2016, local research universities have generated RM6.18 billion income for the country,” Idris added.

by NOORSILA ABD MAJID.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/06/247073/more-cross-border-collaborations-among-top-malaysian-universities-cards

Malaysian Varsities Among Top One Per Cent Of Research Universities In The World

Sunday, June 11th, 2017

PUTRAJAYA, June 8 (Bernama) — All five public research universities in Malaysia have been listed in the top one per cent of such universities in the world.

The five universities are University of Malaya (UM), Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) and Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), which showed an improvement in the world ranking list for the year 2017/2018 issued by Quacquarelli Symonds (QS).

Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh told reporters here today that the achievement was good news for the country’s higher education landscape, especially in celebrating 10 years of initiative to stimulate and encourage growth in research, publishing and innovation.

“Of the 26,000 universities worldwide, the Malaysian research universities are now among the top 260,” he said adding that UM was ranked the highest among Malaysian Universities at 114, and on the verge of breaking into the top 100 universities in the world.

He said the greatest improvement was by UPM which jumped 182 places from 411 in 2013/2014 to 229 in the current world ranking.

UKM went up 72 places to 230 compared with 302 in 2016/2017 while USM improved by 66 places, from 330 in 2016/2017 to 264 in 2017/2018 and UTM went up 101 places from 355 in 2013/2014 to 253 this year, he said.

“The Ministry of Higher Education is confident that the strategic plans outlined in the Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015-2025 will allow our universities to be among the world’s best 100 universities earlier than expected,” he said.

Idris said between 2007 and 2016, university researches had generated more than RM6.18 billion in revenue for the country and this was a 55.3 per cent return on the initial research investment from the government totalling RM3.98 billion.

QS is the world’s first university rating agency recognised by the International Ranking Expert Group, and is considered an important reference for stakeholders worldwide.

QS’ rankings are based on six key performance indicators including academic reputation and ration of students to lecturers.

BERNAMA.

Read more @ http://education.bernama.com/index.php?sid=news_content&id=1362974

Five Malaysian public research varsities listed in top 1% universities worldwide.

Friday, June 9th, 2017

PUTRAJAYA: All five public research universities in Malaysia have been listed in the top 1% universities worldwide.

The five universities are Universiti  Malaya (UM), Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) and Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM).

The universities showed an improvement in the world ranking list for the year 2017/2018 issued by Quacquarelli Symonds (QS).

Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh (pix) told reporters here Thursday that the achievement was good news for the country’s higher education landscape, especially in celebrating 10 years of initiative to stimulate and encourage growth in research, publishing and innovation.

“Of the 26,000 universities worldwide, the Malaysian research universities are now among the top 260,” he said, adding that UM was ranked the highest among Malaysian universities at 114, and on the verge of breaking into the top 100 universities in the world.

He said the greatest improvement was by UPM, which jumped 182 places from 411 in 2013/2014 to 229 in the current world ranking.

UKM went up 72 places to 230 compared with 302 in 2016/2017, while USM improved by 66, from 330 in 2016/2017 to 264 in 2017/2018, and UTM went up 101 places from 355 in 2013/2014 to 253 this year, he said.

“The Ministry of Higher Education is confident that the strategic plans outlined in the Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015-2025 will allow our universities to be among the world’s best 100 universities earlier than expected,” he said.

Idris said between 2007 and 2016, university research had generated more than RM6.18bil in revenue for the country and this was a 55.3% return on the initial research investment from the government totalling RM3.98bil.

BERNAMA.
Read more @
http://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2017/06/08/malaysian-universities-surge-in-world-rankings/#wEJx8kgxrbUEDezf.99

Calls for university autonomy

Wednesday, May 31st, 2017
Idris Jusoh (second from right) and Wan Mohd Zahid Wan Noordin (right) at the event.

UNIVERSITIES should aim for autonomy and accountability which is crucial for the growth and development of the higher education sector in the country said Institute for Democracy and Economic Affairs (IDEAS) chair of higher education Professor Tan Sri Dzulkifli Abdul Razak recently.

Speaking at the National Higher Education Conference 2017: How to Make Our Universities More Autonomous? last week, he added that universities are currently operating like a bureaucracy rather than centres run by intellectuals.

“This conference serves as another milestone where issues related to university autonomy are being re-articulated after a period of intensive research and consultative discussions culminating in the historic meeting of minds.

“This is a defining moment for higher education in Malaysia, especially in universities, to once again put forward the agenda of university autonomy on a national platform. I am very optimistic that we will arrive at another high point to elevate our universities as autonomous and accountable institutions,” he said.

The National Higher Education Conference 2017 was held as a follow-up to IDEAS’ comparative study on Laporan Jawatankuasa Mengkaji, Menyemak dan Membuat Perakuan Tentang Perkembangan dan Hala Tuju Pendidikan Tinggi Malaysia — Langkah Langkah ke arah Kecemerlangan, better known as the Wan Zahid Report, which was published in 2005, and the Malaysia Education Blueprint Higher Education 2015-2025.

The conference, held in collaboration between IDEAS and Yayasan Sime Darby, recommended the abolishment of the Universities and University College Act to be replaced by a National Higher Education Act.

Also present at the conference were Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh and Yayasan Sime Darby governing council member Tan Sri Dr Wan Mohd Zahid Wan Noordin, who led the committee tasked with making recommendations to improve higher education in Malaysia in 2005.

The Wan Zahid report made 138 recommendations to Parliament and includes proposals for academic freedom, financial autonomy and self-governance in universities, many of which were adopted by the Malaysia Education Blueprint Higher Education 2015-2025.

Wan Zahid said: “I am pleased that the government took into account our call for autonomy in the Higher Education Blueprint. Through this project, nevertheless, we hope to strengthen current higher education policies in Malaysia to bolster our institutions further.

“This project, which aims to strengthen current higher education policies, is in line with Yayasan Sime Darby’s objective of complementing the Malaysian government’s efforts in enabling society to gain quality higher education for the future of our country.”

Yayasan Sime Darby supported IDEAS’ research and advocacy initiatives based on the recommendation and findings from the comparative study.

Throughout last year and earlier this year, IDEAS conducted four roundtable discussions with relevant stakeholders from the government, public and private universities as well as think tanks on the topic of autonomy and accountability of universities.

Four policy papers were also produced on the different aspects of autonomy: the history and epistemology of universities, the history of autonomy, financial autonomy, and examples of university autonomy from around the world.

The proposed new National Higher Education Act includes:

-Institutional autonomy, particularly the transfer of administrative control to independent statutory bodies, the inclusion of academics to the university’s board of directors, the appointment of the vice chancellor by the board instead of the Ministry as well as the freedom for universities to hire and fire its own staff and decide on their salaries.

∙ Academic and student autonomy, including the university’s right to completely determine academic syllabi and university programmes as well as the admission of students, academic freedom for lecturers to teach content that they deem suitable for students as well as the elevation of the National Professor Council to that of an independent statutory body.

Red more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/05/244395/calls-university-autonomy

Texts, lectures and courses: Where do we begin?

Wednesday, May 31st, 2017

BEGINNINGS: Intention and Method (1975) is Edward Said’s second book. His first, Joseph Conrad and the Fiction of Autobiography (1966), discussed the idea of becoming a writer — a project rather than a career. In the former, Said explored the beginnings of masterpieces of Modernism and works of theory. In this article, I am deriving benefit from Said’s Beginnings in configuring the significance of studying a course/subject at university.

Every semester is a new beginning for a university student. And every course one registers for on campus to make up the required credit hours to graduate is the beginning of new knowledge. Here one has to go through the rigours of the course — attend lectures, take notes, write papers, embark on projects, sit exams and, of course, read the required texts. Engaging with the required readings precedes the other rituals. These are the beginnings, I suppose, when we take up a course offered by the university — within faculties, departments and programmes, and taught by a professor (used here in the generic sense). It is not simply a process, and never to be conceived as a bureaucratic arrangement in the routinisation of the schedule on a weekly and a semester cycle.

It is fraught with new vocabularies — beginning and starting out, origins and originality, initiation, inauguration, point of departure, revolution, authority, etc — tacit to the student and most probably to the professor too, where the routine predominates. This process is similar to the beginnings of writing. Both refer to a kind of action, it frames the mind, a kind of work, an attitude, a consciousness.

How will the course begin? — is there any epistemological trait that the professor wants to imbue the student with, what kind of orientation is there to begin with, and how will it end? Every first week of the semester (or it should be) is the presence of a beginning to the student.

Central to this beginning is the text, a vocabulary lost (almost), being replaced by “Reference” (Rujukan) and just perhaps, a faint echo of “Required Readings”, over much of the last two decades. Thus in course outlines, “References” seem to be etched in stone. I have seen this in many universities in Malaysia, which I gather is the standard word.

And so there will be a list of “References” —sometimes divided into primary and secondary, or just a single list of books, neither “primary” nor “secondary”, for particular courses offered. Over the years, I have often suggested to the universities/faculties/departments/programmes, in my capacity of assessor/reviewer of curricula, to substitute “References” with words such as ‘Readings” or “Texts”. I have written elsewhere on this, and at different times reminded us that words change the world.

But “References” remain, as if decreed from heaven, dictated by the idea of authority. The regulatory authorities have determined the template for information on courses so much so that it is said to be unalterable. I sense our academics fear the authorities, either within the university or external to it, to make any form of alteration to the course outlines — substantive or otherwise. There is much obsession with what the regulatory body says and determines as “standards”. The sense of individual autonomy is lost in the academic career. Technologically, this is made worse by the structure of the system. Such a climate does not augur well for our universities.

Back to the text. And so I have encountered that putting the word “text” resonates a condescending attitude, in the likes of what an academic has described as a “school textbook”. Does our academic body comprehend what is a text and what purpose it serves? A text serves as a beginning of something — in this case, knowledge and learning — some initial exposure to the corpus of a subject. A course title is not only one, but represents a substantive body of knowledge delivered with a certain rigour at a certain level, in this case, within a university setting. We have to return to the text.

In Beginnings, Said illustrated that the concept of text carries with it an idea, if not an unequivocal achievement, of distinction, or of prestige. He was talking of the novel. And recently some academicians asked me if a work of fiction can be required reading, a text, if you will, for a social science course. I said “yes”.

The idea of a text — required/compulsory reading for a course — is the preservation and presentation of a document — symbolising, producing and connoting meanings in addition to itself. Said, in the context of Beginnings, explained the text as associated to antiquity, say, to the Homeric poems to classical scholarship — its problems and preservation. In the West the classics and the Bible are the best preserved, the most worked over, the most transmitted, and hence considered “the most original texts of all”. Many institutions, including the university, are devoted to preserving the texts and prolonging them.

In the Islamic tradition, textual traditions occur in different conditions. One of them is the idjaz, a concept describing the uniqueness of the Quran as rendering all other text impotent by comparison. All texts are secondary (to the Quran). There is a hierarchy of disciplines and of books in relation to the Quran. The sciences of jurisprudence (fiqh) and tradition (hadith), and sets of systematic textual custom control the editor’s work.

There is a canon of valid sources. There is also the system of idjaza (licence to transmit) — or ijazah (degree) in Bahasa Melayu. In the “manuscript age” — the period from the seventh up to around the end of the 15th century — every Arabic text generally opens with a list of isnads (asaneed) or witnesses, linking the text to a univocal source through a series of oral transmitters.

We may have to reflect that a text fundamentally is that which is read, the production of which is an event, physically, intellectually and spiritually, which has its own genealogy which cannot begin with its reading. A text is a continuing desire to preserve a corpus, in which we have selected as a reading material for our courses. And there is the primary text/s, and the secondary text/s (or primary reading/s and supplementary reading/s). I am afraid, we have lost this, or have we?

by A Murad Merican

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/05/244424/texts-lectures-and-courses-where-do-we-begin

It’s not just about the market

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017
Higher thinking: A university is a diverse place and there has to be autonomy for all these diverse elements to decide for themselves.

Higher thinking: A university is a diverse place and there has to be autonomy for all these diverse elements to decide for themselves.

THE Institute for Democracy and Economic Affairs has come out with a report proposing changes in legislation and policy to increase university autonomy.

If you have more free time than you know what to do with, you can take a look at it on its website. I’ve read it and found the points they make quite good, in particular the need to free universities from too much government interference.

There is a tendency for the Gov­ernment to think that since public universities get much of their funding from public coffers, it has the right to totally determine how universities are run.

This line of thinking is misguided on several grounds.

Firstly, public funds are monies that come from the people. There­fore, the primary responsibility of public universities is to the people and not to the government of the day.

Secondly, and related to the first point, universities must be run free from too much governmental interference as instructions by politicians may not be the best thing for our institutions of higher learning.

They are, after all, creatures of the moment and political expediency, and they may not have the necessary philosophical depth to understand what is needed to ensure a good higher education.

I have a couple of points to make about the report though. Its emphasis is on university autonomy, thus focusing on the university as a single entity. But a university is made of many different entities, namely faculties and departments (or “schools” if you want to be trendy).

Autonomy must be given at all levels. There is a tendency for a top-down approach in this country, and this applies to upper university management too. The top people think they know best and can impose their ideas and values on all those below them.

It does not take a rocket scientist to see that rocket science is very different from Malay Studies. Each faculty and department must have the autonomy to decide for itself on questions of academic excellence.

There is nothing quite as frustrating as having a vice-chancellor from a totally different discipline imposing policies on the various faculties and departments.

A university is a very diverse place and there has to be autonomy for all these diverse elements to make decisions for themselves. Let me give a simple example.

It may be that for medical researchers, the publications that are best for them to get their work accepted are international journals. However, for some subjects in law like Civil Procedure, it would probably be much better to be published locally so that your work can be read and used by those that matter: the Malaysian legal fraternity.

Another point I want to make is that there is too much focus on market forces and education, as though the market is the ultimate arbiter on how things should be. To some extent this is true. Some subjects are very dependent on keeping up to date with the realities of the world in order to stay relevant.

But there are some things which, on the face of it, simply do not have market value, but still have very great value. Subjects such as History, Philosophy, Literature, Cultural Studies and the like may not appear to be attractive to the “real world”.

by AZMI SHAROM
Read more @ http://www.thestar.com.my/opinion/columnists/brave-new-world/2017/05/24/its-not-just-about-the-market-universities-are-not-just-about-training-the-workforce-but-also-about/#REGBZbpz5bPJ22zB.99

Produce talent, not graduates

Saturday, May 13th, 2017

Noor Kamilah Barvin Mohd Meera’

LIFELONG learning has always been Noor Kamilah Barvin Mohd Meera’s priority as there is a need to keep up with change to advance in one’s career.

“Employers seek talent. One must be skilled to be employed. Unskilled employees will drain the resources of an organisation,” said Noor Kamilah.

“We have been producing a lot of graduates, not talent. For that very reason, I decided to enhance my skills by pursuing the Master in Human Resource Management programme.”

Noor Kamilah is of the opinion that one need not follow the standard route of pursuing a diploma course, followed by a bachelor’s and master’s degree courses, all before the age of 25.

“It is not as simple as that. Theory without practice is a waste. That is why I chose to work and gain experience and exposure before furthering my studies,” she said.

“We can’t deny the importance of upgrading knowledge and skills through lifelong learning. It is useful not only for one’s career but also in making life decisions and when starting a business.

“Lifelong learners can contribute to society in many ways.”

Education counsellor Mohd Zahir Abdul Rahman said lifelong learning helps the workforce adapt to any environment.

LIFELONG learning has always been Noor Kamilah Barvin Mohd Meera’s priority as there is a need to keep up with change to advance in one’s career.

“Employers seek talent. One must be skilled to be employed. Unskilled employees will drain the resources of an organisation,” said Noor Kamilah.

“We have been producing a lot of graduates, not talent. For that very reason, I decided to enhance my skills by pursuing the Master in Human Resource Management programme.”

Noor Kamilah is of the opinion that one need not follow the standard route of pursuing a diploma course, followed by a bachelor’s and master’s degree courses, all before the age of 25.

“It is not as simple as that. Theory without practice is a waste. That is why I chose to work and gain experience and exposure before furthering my studies,” she said.

“We can’t deny the importance of upgrading knowledge and skills through lifelong learning. It is useful not only for one’s career but also in making life decisions and when starting a business.

“Lifelong learners can contribute to society in many ways.”

Education counsellor Mohd Zahir Abdul Rahman said lifelong learning helps the workforce adapt to any environment.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/05/238244/produce-talent-not-graduates