Archive for the ‘Careers’ Category

Moulding graduates to meet industry requirements

Wednesday, December 13th, 2017
Vocational training comprising of apprenticeship in companies starts at 16 in Switzerland.

TODAY’s job market is highly competitive and feedback from employers tend to show that the potential workforce being produced by the higher education sector are incapable of totally filling up the available vacancies.

If this is true, why is it so and how can graduates be ensured of gaining employment after completing studies at the university or other types of institutions of higher education?

Technology and knowledge today develops at Internet speed so it is not uncommon for things that are learned during the course of a programme to become obsolete once students have graduated from the university, requiring them to be trained yet again by the employers upon joining the workforce.

Faced with this kind of situation, it is best that the education sector and the industry work together closely to produce the workforce required — starting from a pre-university stage, said Swiss Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training (SFIVET) Board chairman Dr Philippe Gnaegi.

“We have a very long tradition in Switzerland where 70 per cent of students in the upper secondary education system follow vocational training. This starts at 16 where they spend 3.5 days of the week working at companies — large and small — from various industries and 1.5 days at school. The arrangement has worked well and we have a very low unemployment rate — less than three per cent,” he said.

He was facilitating a roundtable discussion on “Is it an institution’s responsibility to build industry relationships?” at the recent BETT Asia 2017 held in Kuala Lumpur.

SFIVET is Switzerland’s expert organisation for vocational education and training. It provides basic and continuous training to VET professionals, conducts VET research, contributes to the development and continuous updating of training plans for specific occupations and supports international cooperation in vocational education and training.

Elaborating further on the Swiss vocational education system, Gnaegi said the students undergoing apprenticeship are paid for the work done at the companies. Employers, on the other hand, have a talent pipeline of skilled professionals who will be potentially transitioned in to the labour market.

“The apprenticeship lasts for three to four years where students are assessed both by the state — for the education part — and also from the private sector. Students have to get two sets of assessment to continue their studies. However, they would move on to our professional universities, not academic-based ones,” he said.

“We think that not everybody has to go to academic universities as it depends on their inclination. In most countries, the very intelligent students go to academic universities. We don’t practice that and don’t believe in discrimination. Very intelligent children are also in the vocational stream,” he said.

Gnaegi remarked that both systems have a curricula and national qualification designed by the social partners comprising state associations, companies and training organisations, and the state invests substantially in research, evaluation and quality control.

“The industry and the state often meet to examine the effectiveness of the vocational education system and solve any problems should they arise. The challenge for SFIVET is to get more companies to buy-in into the programme and match the needs of the labour market, both in terms of professional qualifications and the number of jobs available,” he said.

Malaysia Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh, who attended the discussion, said that he was impressed with the Swiss vocational education system, how it works and intends to take a closer look.

“Of course, not everything is applicable here in our country. But the close ties and relationship between the industry and education system is commendable in terms of facilitating graduate employment. We are one in this aim — the public and private sectors — and therefore, must work together,” he said.

By ROZANA SANI

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/12/313861/moulding-graduates-meet-industry-requirements

Machines taking over our jobs? Academics weigh in on the issue.

Friday, December 1st, 2017

THE World Economic Forum’s warning that five million jobs could disappear in five years because of advances in technology sounds like robots are taking over the world.

In a report published early 2016, the WEF said that developments in artificial intelligence, robotics and biotechnology would disrupt the business world in a similar way to previous industrial revolutions, with administrative and white collar office jobs most at risk, according to a CNN report.

New skill sets that are relevant in the Fourth Industrial Revolution were explored at the forum, as it looked at how disruptive technology has impacted the higher education industry and traditional fields like law, medicine, science, business, finance, accounting and construction.

The roundtable was attended by Management Development Institute of Singapore (Malaysia campus) CEO Prof Datuk Dr Syed Ahmad Hussein, Newcastle University Medicine Malaysia provost-CEO Prof Roger Barton, University of Reading Malaysia provost Prof Tony Downes, Iskandar Investment Berhad president-CEO Datuk Khairil Anwar Ahmad, University of Southampton Malaysia interim CEO Prof Peter Smith, and Raffles University Iskandar president Prof Dr Graeme Britton. Star Media Group editor-in-chief Datuk Leanne Goh was the moderator.

Disruptive technology is not a new phenomenon, the panellists say. While disruptive technology has brought change, and with it the fear that manual jobs are disappearing, Prof Britton foresees that there will be new opportunities as well.

“When computers came, people said it would run the world and we’d be out of jobs. But computers have created more jobs instead,” he says.

Prof Smith says that quantum computing and quantum technologies will transform what we do in the future, and “we are at an early stage of a revolution to create new companies and new industries.”

The consensus among the roundtable panellists is that adaptability and resilience are key attributes a fresh graduate should possess in order to forge successful careers in a rapidly-changing world where disruptive technology constantly influences how things are done.

“Skills that they use immediately after leaving university may be redundant further down their careers,” says Prof Downes. “What’s essential is for graduates to have an ability to continue to learn. This will be key to their success in the future.”

Because globalisation and technological development are realities of life, Dr Syed Ahmad says “we should not resist or reject them, but manoeuvre around them to get the best advantage.”

Sharing his observations from the construction industry today, Khairil says innovations and technology are being harnessed to address some of the disruptive developments taking place. He cites the shortage of skilled workers which has compelled the industry to automate certain functions and processes, resulting in industrialised building systems that depend less on on-site work.

In the field of medicine, Prof Barton says that it is all digital. “Many will see its impact on medicine as a positive one, for it facilitated quicker and better healthcare. It enables rather than disrupts,” he says.

BERNAMA.

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2017/11/30/machines-taking-over-our-jobs-academics-weigh-in-on-the-issue/#CkL4kPMMo5×0xWAJ.99

Sea of career opportunities

Friday, December 1st, 2017
A maritime student undergoing practical lessons at a commercial port.

THE maritime sector is of crucial importance to modern societies. The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development 2017 cites that 90 per cent of world trade is carried by the international shipping industry, and the maritime sector is more than just ocean-based transportation and its management.

Industry components include the naval industry comprising naval engineering and shipbuilding companies, and the component supply sector; commercial fishing and aquaculture industry; the cruise and recreational sector; sport and commercial ports and marinas; marine and ocean research and sciences; and maritime training academies and training centres.

The maritime sector is a potential source of vibrant employment and career opportunities, especially for Malaysia, a trading and maritime nation.

The Straits of Malacca carries 80 per cent of trade between the east and west, making it one of the world’s busiest routes in the world. Add the recent One Belt One Road initiative by Chinese President Xi Jinping and Malaysia is on the world maritime logistics map with immediate landbridge investment in the Port of Kuantan, Port Klang and the East Coast Rail Link linking Tumpat in Kelantan to Port Klang.

The Melaka Gateway is another venture by Chinese investors that will help spearhead the development of the tourism sector while the Pengerang Integrated Petroleum Complex development drives global shipping and supply chain activities.

All these augur well for the country because it is also an exporting nation, noted shipping tycoon Tan Sri Halim Mohammad, the founder and executive chairman of formerly listed Halim Mazmin Bhd which has diversified business interests in shipping, aviation, education, hospitality and tourism.

“The shipping industry in this region is poised for tremendous growth and along with the dynamic environment of the shipping industry, it is expected that professionals, industrial leaders as well as managers with the capabilities to analyse and deal with the growth and highly competitive nature of the industry will be much sought after.

“In addition, managers are expected to apply their knowledge of theories, concepts and shipping practices to facilitate sound decision-making with the use of strategic management tools to seek opportunities,” said Halim.

To provide a platform for prospective executives and managers to learn and be prepared for the critical tasks of leading shipping and business-related organisations in the expanding industry, Halim Mazmin has established Meritus University specialising in maritime education.

Situated at Mid Valley City in Kuala Lumpur, it also has a floating campus off Langkawi, a first in the region.

“Meritus unveiled its maiden degree programme — the three-year Bachelor of Science (Honours) Maritime Business — last year. The course has been fully vetted by myself and in consultation with the industry in compliance with its demands.

“Therefore, when a student graduates, he or she will have a full grasp of industry expectations in the workplace. Those with this qualification can not only work in Malaysia but also Singapore, Hong Kong, Indonesia, China and any country with a maritime industry,” he added.

The degree programme comprises 70 per cent maritime content and 30 per cent business. “Students will find it interesting because it is not purely technical: they will spend time in class at the Kuala Lumpur campus and at sea in our floating campus, sailing on a ship.”

Meritus students attend a 21-day outdoor leadership programme on board Halim Mazmin vessels to experience life at sea. “This course offers students exposure on board a ship — they will sail, learn to manage all parts of the ship and how it runs while looking into scheduling, drydocking, insurance and the legal aspects.

“If something happens at sea, the students must be able to support the captain.”

Prior to this, Halim said it takes two or three years for a business or finance graduate to join the maritime industry and understand the shipping jargon. Upon graduation at Meritus, students will not only have a degree but also the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport qualification.

“So, Meritus offers a shorter route. Its graduates will be able to contribute immensely to their industry of choice rather than go through a stage of two to three years before they take up management positions and responsibilities in shipping and logistics companies, port authorities and finance companies.”

Meritus also has a foundation course and the Master’s in Business Administration programme. The Masters of Science in Shipping, Trade and Finance programme is in the pipeline.

SEAFARERS

As much as there is a need for management professionals in the maritime sector, there is also an urgent demand for those sailing the seas.

Malaysia’s International Maritime Organisation (IMO) ambassador Captain Nazri Abu Hassan said there are 1.6 million seafarers worldwide of whom 700,000 are officers and 800,000 are ratings (non-officers).

In Malaysia, there are 3,000 local officers sailing Malaysian ships but there is a constant demand for 5,000 officers annually to fill vacancies.

By ROZANA SANI -.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/11/308713/sea-career-opportunities

What graduate job hunters want

Wednesday, November 29th, 2017
PricewaterhouseCoopers celebrating its win at Malaysia’s 100 Leading Graduate Employers Awards Night 2017.

MALAYSIA’S 100 Leading Graduate Employers 2017 survey has found that university student and graduate job hunters seek employer leadership, training and development as well as good career prospects.

Factors such as attractive location, status and prestige. and high starting salary were least important to them.

The survey, which took place from January till mid-September, also determined employer attractiveness, which answers the question “Why do I want to work for this company?”.

The largest and longest-running graduate recruitment study in the country also reveals that 47.4 per cent of the respondents have not undergone internships while at the university.

This year, the respondents are willing to submit as many as 13 job applications before finding their first job. And 24.5 per cent have received job offers, marking a significant increase from the 18.9 per cent recorded last year.

University students and graduates, however, do not like long hours at work. They are willing to work 8.6 hours per day, the same duration recorded in the 2016 survey.

However, their expected starting salary has decreased this year compared to last year. The expected salary of RM2,712 is a decrease from the RM2,827 expected in 2016. The figure was RM2,999 in 2015.

In terms of internships, 43.1 per cent of students and graduates completed one formal internship while at university, while 7.2 per cent have undergone two formal practical experience.

Only 2.3 per cent have completed three or more internships during their studies. Compared to 2016, there is increased participation in work experience and social, voluntary and political activities by the respondents this year. Some 72.4 per cent are involved in social activities such as student societies, charities, religious groups and non-governmental organisations. Meanwhile, 71.9 per cent have work experience unrelated to their course of study.

The respondents are also involved in work, study or voluntary activities in a foreign country (32.7 per cent) and political activities such as political parties, lobbying or special interest groups (13.4 per cent).

This year, the survey gathered responses both online and offline from 29,659 university students and fresh graduates from tertiary institutions across the country. The number of respondents is an increase of 5.6 per cent from last year.

There is also an increase in respondents with above average achievements. Thirty-two per cent are from this high achieving group of students in 2017, compared to 26.8 per cent in 2016.

Forty-nine per cent are average students, while the remaining are those with below average academic achievements. A whopping 32 per cent are final-year students graduating this year while 20 per cent are expected to graduate in 2018. Seventeen per cent of respondents are fresh graduates.

By Zulita Mustafa.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/11/305954/what-graduate-job-hunters-want

‘Master English to progress’

Saturday, November 25th, 2017

KUALA TERENGGANU: Mastery in English will take students further in their pursuits, says Petronas East Coast regional office general manager Wan Hasnan Wan Abdullah.

He said youths can build their confidence to reach out and learn from those beyond their peer group by mastering English.

“English proficiency will also give you a competitive edge as you head into employment and will be useful for you to survive the challenging working sphere,” he told students during the closing ceremony of the Mega Trenglish Camp at Taman Tamadun Islam here on Tuesday.

The Mega Trenglish Camp was a three-day camp that saw the participation of 210 Form Four students from 40 Trenglish schools around Terengganu.

The camp, sponsored by Petronas in collaboration with Yayasan Terengganu and the state education department, is the climax to the 2017 programme.

Trenglish was introduced to enhance the proficiency of English in the state.

Wan Hasnan said according to a survey conducted by a job portal in 2015, poor command of the English language was one of the reasons why Malaysian graduates found it difficult to land jobs.

Wan Hasnan said the number of schools sponsored by Petronas for the Trenglish programme has increased from 37 to 50, of which eight are primary and 42 secondary.

Petronas has contributed 150,000 copies of The Star’s Newspaper-in-Education (NiE) pullout to complement the company’s existing contribution for the Trenglish programme. Each pullout comes with a copy of the newspaper.

Two NiE workshops were held at the camp to bolster the use of newspapers in class.
Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2017/11/24/master-english-to-progress-language-will-help-secure-jobs-students-told/#XHPv4K3MUgObzs7r.99

What graduate job hunters want

Friday, November 24th, 2017
PricewaterhouseCoopers celebrating its win at Malaysia’s 100 Leading Graduate Employers Awards Night 2017.

MALAYSIA’S 100 Leading Graduate Employers 2017 survey has found that university student and graduate job hunters seek employer leadership, training and development as well as good career prospects.

Factors such as attractive location, status and prestige. and high starting salary were least important to them.

The survey, which took place from January till mid-September, also determined employer attractiveness, which answers the question “Why do I want to work for this company?”.

The largest and longest-running graduate recruitment study in the country also reveals that 47.4 per cent of the respondents have not undergone internships while at the university.

This year, the respondents are willing to submit as many as 13 job applications before finding their first job. And 24.5 per cent have received job offers, marking a significant increase from the 18.9 per cent recorded last year.

University students and graduates, however, do not like long hours at work. They are willing to work 8.6 hours per day, the same duration recorded in the 2016 survey.

However, their expected starting salary has decreased this year compared to last year. The expected salary of RM2,712 is a decrease from the RM2,827 expected in 2016. The figure was RM2,999 in 2015.

In terms of internships, 43.1 per cent of students and graduates completed one formal internship while at university, while 7.2 per cent have undergone two formal practical experience.

Only 2.3 per cent have completed three or more internships during their studies. Compared to 2016, there is increased participation in work experience and social, voluntary and political activities by the respondents this year. Some 72.4 per cent are involved in social activities such as student societies, charities, religious groups and non-governmental organisations. Meanwhile, 71.9 per cent have work experience unrelated to their course of study.

The respondents are also involved in work, study or voluntary activities in a foreign country (32.7 per cent) and political activities such as political parties, lobbying or special interest groups (13.4 per cent).

This year, the survey gathered responses both online and offline from 29,659 university students and fresh graduates from tertiary institutions across the country. The number of respondents is an increase of 5.6 per cent from last year.

There is also an increase in respondents with above average achievements. Thirty-two per cent are from this high achieving group of students in 2017, compared to 26.8 per cent in 2016.

Forty-nine per cent are average students, while the remaining are those with below average academic achievements. A whopping 32 per cent are final-year students graduating this year while 20 per cent are expected to graduate in 2018. Seventeen per cent of respondents are fresh graduates.

The survey results were announced during Malaysia’s 100 Leading Graduate Employers Awards Night 2017 held in Kuala Lumpur.

PricewaterhouseCoopers emerged as the most popular employer among university students and graduates in the country, followed by Ernst & Young and Maybank. Other employers include Petronas; Top Glove Corporation Bhd; UEM Group; KPMG; AirAsia; Sime Darby; and Deloitte.

Ernst & Young Malaysia talent leader and partner Lee Soo Fern said the recognition is an affirmation that the firm is a good employer by providing career opportunities for aspiring talents.

“We are not the only firm which provides professional service but what is different is how we do it. The people, culture and support make the difference.

“We promote a sense of belonging, value diversity and ensure equal chance for success. We provide learning opportunities, career advancement and challenging assignments to encourage recruits to succeed sooner that they think they can,” she said.

Maybank talent attraction and workplace futurisation head Sophia Ang Wui Jiun said it believes in building talent and ensuring that the group stays relevant.

By Zulita Mustafa.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/11/305954/what-graduate-job-hunters-want

Employers value workers with good English

Sunday, October 15th, 2017
NIE Specialist Vincent D’Silva (standing right) with Grand Bluewave Hotel general manager Long Cheow Siong observing the students at the workshop. (pix by VINCENT D’SILVA)

JOHOR BARU: The reality of the workforce today is that employers are looking for qualified workers who are not just skillful in their field, but also competent in English communication.

Grand BlueWave Hotel general manager, Long Cheow Siong told participants at the New Straits Times-Newspaper in Education (NST-NIE), who comprised 95 Form Six students, that prospective employers valued candidates who possessed the soft skills that can carry themselves through in their career progression.

The half-day workshop was co-organised by the Johor English Language Teaching Association (Jelta) and Johor Education Department with support from the hotel.

Jelta president Vincent D’Silva conducted the workshop.

According to Long, English is the major language used for communication in most work places in the private sector. He said the language is a tool used in crossborder business dealings and networking with international counterparts.

“There is a certain benchmark for companies to penetrate the market. English plays a pivotal role in distinguishing which companies have that extra edge against its competitors,” said Long in special talk he gave to the Form Six students.

He told them that it was essential to master the English language not only for the sake of passing examinations, but to ensure they can secure a job later on in the future.

“Many of those I had interviewed in the past possess qualificiations for jobs in accountancy, hospitality and tourism fields, but some of them lacked the proficiency in English. I could see this when they were expressing their thoughts and opinions orally,” he said.

He said most employers these days were looking beyond good grades in English.

“Candidates for jobs must posses a good command of spoken English.

“It is very crucial for our youth, who will be joining the workforce in the future, to be able to speak English professionally. They need to become fluent speakers of the language as they also reflect the company’s good name when they are meeting with potential customers or considering career enhancement elsewhere,” he said.

Meanwhile Johor Baru District Education Office’s English unit for secondary schools officer, Al Mujani Abdul Rahman said an initiative to further increase English proficiency among school students in the state was carried out in the past two years under the Education Ministry’s ‘Highly Immersive Programme’ (HIP), which focuses on the usage of English language in school activities.

“Since the start of the programme in Johor two years ago, 10 schools were made to observed the HIP initiative.

“This year, the number increased to 60 schools statewide. By next year, there will be a total of 150 primary and secondary schools in the state that will be adopting HIP,” he said.

Al Mujani said based on his observations of students in the district, a majority of them are able to write and express their thoughts and opinions in English on paper, but they have difficulties conversing fluently in the language.

“They either do not have the confidence to speak or they do not understand the words they are trying to say which became a limitation for some of them,” he said.

Al Mujani welcomed the advocacy of English proficiency as recently stated by Permaisuri Johor Raja Zarith Sofiah Sultan Idris Shah, who is the Royal Patron of the Malaysian English Language Teaching Associaton.

“This is why the Johor Education Department is working closely with Jelta to address this issue with students and teaching professional via platforms such as the NST-NIE workshop.

“We hope to colloborate more in future with Jelta and the New Straits Times in this effort to improve the mastery of the English language among our students,” he said.

Jelta president Vincent D’Silva, an English lecturer who has been conducting NST-NIE workshops for the past 19 years, said students will find the NST to be the best tool in helping them to enhance their command of English.

He said the newspaper was a flexible teaching tool that can be used in all areas of curriculum, in all aspects of the different syllabus in schools.

“It is for every level and age, encompassing everyone irregardless of their level of competency. What is important is the reader must fully understand what they are reading and make full use of the news content in the paper to improve their command in English,” said D’Silva

One of the participants, Syarifah Syafiah Syed Mustafa, 18, from SMK Sultan Ismail she had joined the workshop to get insight on English requirements that employers look for.

“I know English is not just about writing but also being able to express ourselves in the language, as we would be meeting or socialising with others using English as a professional language,” she said.

By Halim Said.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2017/10/291060/employers-value-workers-good-english

The point about English

Monday, October 9th, 2017
If graduates applying for a job have poor English communication skills, potential employers can’t gauge their character to see if they are a good fit for the job.

WHEN hotel manager Long Cheow Siong recently interviewed a university graduate for a position at his establishment in Johor Baru , the latter’s weak grasp of English baffled him.

The interview with the youngster, who walked in with several others to pitch for an administrative position, was a dampener.

Long was not looking for a worker with impeccable English, but he noticed that the young man could not convey who he was as a person in simple English

“This youngster has a diploma in hospitality and was applying for an administrative post at the hotel.

“But his basic communication skills in English were poor and that is very disappointing,” Long said.

“The interview ended with me not knowing who the interviewee really was. He couldn’t express what his career goals, hobbies and interests were.

“Employers want to know more about a person’s character to see if they have the right attitude for the position they applied for.”

This is a constant lament of Malaysian employers about English proficiency among local job applicants.

They have often complained about the standard of English not only among school leavers, but also university graduates.

As English is an international language widely used in various spheres, not being proficient in the language is something hard to accept.

The issue of poor English proficiency among Malaysian job seekers gained prominence recently when Permaisuri Johor Raja Zarith Sofiah Sultan Idris Shah called for concerted efforts by academicians, non-governmental organisations and corporations to provide opportunities for youngsters to learn the language.

She said serious and urgent intervention was needed to resolve the “dramatic and drastic” decline in the proficiency of written and spoken English among Malaysia’s younger generation.

Raja Zarith Sofiah’s suggestion spurred much discussion on social media and even earned brickbats from Facebook users who claimed that a focus on English would erode the use of the national language.

Such opinions prompted Raja Zarith Sofiah to write a posting on Facebook, in which she related her personal experience of how English had helped her engage with western thinkers and policymakers to correct misconceptions about Islam.

She said communicating with academicians and policymakers in English helped her get her message across during a talk she gave at Somerville College, University of Oxford in the United Kingdom five years ago.

She mentioned two other instances when English helped to bridge the gap between eastern and western thinkers: once, during a talk about Islam and science by former Universiti Teknologi Malaysia vice-chancellor Datuk Zaini Ujang at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, and the other during the World Islamic Economic Forum, which she attended a few times.

“In all the three examples, it is the use of English which had made it possible for those of us here in the east to express our opinions and concerns with those from the west.

“That is why I believe our young people should be given the chance to learn the language,” she said on her official Facebook page.

Raja Zarith Sofiah said speaking English did not make a person less Malaysian.

She said she spoke to and wrote letters to her parents and siblings in her mother tongue when she lived and studied in the UK.

She recalled her cravings for Malaysian food during weekly cookouts with her siblings in the UK, during which they would warn their English neighbours before they began grilling belacan to make their favourite condiment, sambal belacan

“During the 11 years I lived
in England, I did not for even
one second forget that I was a Malaysian.

“I did not dye my hair blonde or wear blue contact lenses (although I see there is a trend in Malaysia now for ladies to look ‘pink-skinned’ and wear coloured contact lenses),” she said.

By Ahmad Fairuz Othman

40 Unimas Medical Students To Receive Scholarship From State Government – Abang Johari

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

KUCHING, Sept 18 (Bernama) — The state government through the Sarawak Foundation will finance the education of 40 students pursuing medicine at Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (Unimas) beginning this year, says Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Abang Johari Tun Openg.

He said the decision was made to produce more doctors from the state as well as to reduce the ratio of doctors to patients in Sarawak, which was currently one doctor for every 822 patients.

Looking at the huge ratio, Abang Johari said the state government decided to award scholarships to qualified students, in line with the government’s focus on human capacity building.

“The 40 recipients today are the first batch to receive this scholarship involving an allocation of RM4 million a year, so for the duration of their five-year study, we will finance RM20 million.

“Next year, we will fund another 40 students, and we want to have more than 100 doctors (through government scholarship) within five years,” he said at the scholarship award ceremony at Wisma Bapa Malaysia, Petra Jaya here, today.

BERNAMA.

Read more @ http://education.bernama.com/index.php?sid=news_content&id=1392488

Here are the 10 highest paying jobs in Malaysia this year

Wednesday, September 20th, 2017
Those working in the IT, healthcare and engineering sectors are paid much better, according to the latest findings by iMoney.

KUALA LUMPUR: People working in the country’s engineering, IT and healthcare sectors earn the most amount of money, according to the latest findings by leading financial comparison website iMoney.

It also said those working in the hotel and restaurant industry, the education and training sector, as well as training and human resources are paid the lowest.

The findings are based on a report by online career-recruiting company Jobstreet, which uses actual job advertisements.

iMoney said although the hotel and restaurant industries offered among the highest salaries for entry-level positions, it is also listed as the worst-paying industry overall.

The best paying entry-level jobs, it said, are in the engineering and construction sectors (RM5,533), hotels, restaurants and business management consultancies (RM5,100) and IT (RM4,600).

For junior executives, the best paid jobs are in the IT banking and financial sectors (RM6,500), healthcare retail and merchandise (RM5,950), and the IT and chemical industries (RM5,182).

Further up the ladder, the highest paying senior executive jobs are in the science and oil and gas industries (RM28,250), healthcare grooming, beauty and fitness business (RM15,167), and engineering consulting (RM11,333).

At for manager level jobs, the highest salaries come from the construction and oil and gas industries (RM15,611), accounting and jewellery sectors (RM14,500), and engineering and fast-moving consumer goods sectors (RM14,500).

For senior management positions, the highest salaries come from the administration and human resources, construction and engineering (RM35,000), followed by healthcare services (RM27,500), and the semiconductor industry (RM27,500).

iMoney said lower level positions in certain industries offered higher salaries compared to management-level jobs.

For example, the salary of a senior executive position in the oil and gas industry is higher than jobs in the managerial role.

The report also showed that the monthly average salary in Malaysia is RM5,000, while the maximum is RM83,333.

It also highlighted that six out of 10 Malaysian employees would change jobs for better salaries or benefits.

It said 40 per cent of employees would stay with their current employer for work-life balance, while a total of 38 per cent of employees would stay because of their salary packages.

By FERNANDO FONG.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2017/09/281649/here-are-10-highest-paying-jobs-malaysia-year