Archive for the ‘Careers’ Category

Employers value workers with good English

Sunday, October 15th, 2017
NIE Specialist Vincent D’Silva (standing right) with Grand Bluewave Hotel general manager Long Cheow Siong observing the students at the workshop. (pix by VINCENT D’SILVA)

JOHOR BARU: The reality of the workforce today is that employers are looking for qualified workers who are not just skillful in their field, but also competent in English communication.

Grand BlueWave Hotel general manager, Long Cheow Siong told participants at the New Straits Times-Newspaper in Education (NST-NIE), who comprised 95 Form Six students, that prospective employers valued candidates who possessed the soft skills that can carry themselves through in their career progression.

The half-day workshop was co-organised by the Johor English Language Teaching Association (Jelta) and Johor Education Department with support from the hotel.

Jelta president Vincent D’Silva conducted the workshop.

According to Long, English is the major language used for communication in most work places in the private sector. He said the language is a tool used in crossborder business dealings and networking with international counterparts.

“There is a certain benchmark for companies to penetrate the market. English plays a pivotal role in distinguishing which companies have that extra edge against its competitors,” said Long in special talk he gave to the Form Six students.

He told them that it was essential to master the English language not only for the sake of passing examinations, but to ensure they can secure a job later on in the future.

“Many of those I had interviewed in the past possess qualificiations for jobs in accountancy, hospitality and tourism fields, but some of them lacked the proficiency in English. I could see this when they were expressing their thoughts and opinions orally,” he said.

He said most employers these days were looking beyond good grades in English.

“Candidates for jobs must posses a good command of spoken English.

“It is very crucial for our youth, who will be joining the workforce in the future, to be able to speak English professionally. They need to become fluent speakers of the language as they also reflect the company’s good name when they are meeting with potential customers or considering career enhancement elsewhere,” he said.

Meanwhile Johor Baru District Education Office’s English unit for secondary schools officer, Al Mujani Abdul Rahman said an initiative to further increase English proficiency among school students in the state was carried out in the past two years under the Education Ministry’s ‘Highly Immersive Programme’ (HIP), which focuses on the usage of English language in school activities.

“Since the start of the programme in Johor two years ago, 10 schools were made to observed the HIP initiative.

“This year, the number increased to 60 schools statewide. By next year, there will be a total of 150 primary and secondary schools in the state that will be adopting HIP,” he said.

Al Mujani said based on his observations of students in the district, a majority of them are able to write and express their thoughts and opinions in English on paper, but they have difficulties conversing fluently in the language.

“They either do not have the confidence to speak or they do not understand the words they are trying to say which became a limitation for some of them,” he said.

Al Mujani welcomed the advocacy of English proficiency as recently stated by Permaisuri Johor Raja Zarith Sofiah Sultan Idris Shah, who is the Royal Patron of the Malaysian English Language Teaching Associaton.

“This is why the Johor Education Department is working closely with Jelta to address this issue with students and teaching professional via platforms such as the NST-NIE workshop.

“We hope to colloborate more in future with Jelta and the New Straits Times in this effort to improve the mastery of the English language among our students,” he said.

Jelta president Vincent D’Silva, an English lecturer who has been conducting NST-NIE workshops for the past 19 years, said students will find the NST to be the best tool in helping them to enhance their command of English.

He said the newspaper was a flexible teaching tool that can be used in all areas of curriculum, in all aspects of the different syllabus in schools.

“It is for every level and age, encompassing everyone irregardless of their level of competency. What is important is the reader must fully understand what they are reading and make full use of the news content in the paper to improve their command in English,” said D’Silva

One of the participants, Syarifah Syafiah Syed Mustafa, 18, from SMK Sultan Ismail she had joined the workshop to get insight on English requirements that employers look for.

“I know English is not just about writing but also being able to express ourselves in the language, as we would be meeting or socialising with others using English as a professional language,” she said.

By Halim Said.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2017/10/291060/employers-value-workers-good-english

The point about English

Monday, October 9th, 2017
If graduates applying for a job have poor English communication skills, potential employers can’t gauge their character to see if they are a good fit for the job.

WHEN hotel manager Long Cheow Siong recently interviewed a university graduate for a position at his establishment in Johor Baru , the latter’s weak grasp of English baffled him.

The interview with the youngster, who walked in with several others to pitch for an administrative position, was a dampener.

Long was not looking for a worker with impeccable English, but he noticed that the young man could not convey who he was as a person in simple English

“This youngster has a diploma in hospitality and was applying for an administrative post at the hotel.

“But his basic communication skills in English were poor and that is very disappointing,” Long said.

“The interview ended with me not knowing who the interviewee really was. He couldn’t express what his career goals, hobbies and interests were.

“Employers want to know more about a person’s character to see if they have the right attitude for the position they applied for.”

This is a constant lament of Malaysian employers about English proficiency among local job applicants.

They have often complained about the standard of English not only among school leavers, but also university graduates.

As English is an international language widely used in various spheres, not being proficient in the language is something hard to accept.

The issue of poor English proficiency among Malaysian job seekers gained prominence recently when Permaisuri Johor Raja Zarith Sofiah Sultan Idris Shah called for concerted efforts by academicians, non-governmental organisations and corporations to provide opportunities for youngsters to learn the language.

She said serious and urgent intervention was needed to resolve the “dramatic and drastic” decline in the proficiency of written and spoken English among Malaysia’s younger generation.

Raja Zarith Sofiah’s suggestion spurred much discussion on social media and even earned brickbats from Facebook users who claimed that a focus on English would erode the use of the national language.

Such opinions prompted Raja Zarith Sofiah to write a posting on Facebook, in which she related her personal experience of how English had helped her engage with western thinkers and policymakers to correct misconceptions about Islam.

She said communicating with academicians and policymakers in English helped her get her message across during a talk she gave at Somerville College, University of Oxford in the United Kingdom five years ago.

She mentioned two other instances when English helped to bridge the gap between eastern and western thinkers: once, during a talk about Islam and science by former Universiti Teknologi Malaysia vice-chancellor Datuk Zaini Ujang at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, and the other during the World Islamic Economic Forum, which she attended a few times.

“In all the three examples, it is the use of English which had made it possible for those of us here in the east to express our opinions and concerns with those from the west.

“That is why I believe our young people should be given the chance to learn the language,” she said on her official Facebook page.

Raja Zarith Sofiah said speaking English did not make a person less Malaysian.

She said she spoke to and wrote letters to her parents and siblings in her mother tongue when she lived and studied in the UK.

She recalled her cravings for Malaysian food during weekly cookouts with her siblings in the UK, during which they would warn their English neighbours before they began grilling belacan to make their favourite condiment, sambal belacan

“During the 11 years I lived
in England, I did not for even
one second forget that I was a Malaysian.

“I did not dye my hair blonde or wear blue contact lenses (although I see there is a trend in Malaysia now for ladies to look ‘pink-skinned’ and wear coloured contact lenses),” she said.

By Ahmad Fairuz Othman

40 Unimas Medical Students To Receive Scholarship From State Government – Abang Johari

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

KUCHING, Sept 18 (Bernama) — The state government through the Sarawak Foundation will finance the education of 40 students pursuing medicine at Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (Unimas) beginning this year, says Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Abang Johari Tun Openg.

He said the decision was made to produce more doctors from the state as well as to reduce the ratio of doctors to patients in Sarawak, which was currently one doctor for every 822 patients.

Looking at the huge ratio, Abang Johari said the state government decided to award scholarships to qualified students, in line with the government’s focus on human capacity building.

“The 40 recipients today are the first batch to receive this scholarship involving an allocation of RM4 million a year, so for the duration of their five-year study, we will finance RM20 million.

“Next year, we will fund another 40 students, and we want to have more than 100 doctors (through government scholarship) within five years,” he said at the scholarship award ceremony at Wisma Bapa Malaysia, Petra Jaya here, today.

BERNAMA.

Read more @ http://education.bernama.com/index.php?sid=news_content&id=1392488

Here are the 10 highest paying jobs in Malaysia this year

Wednesday, September 20th, 2017
Those working in the IT, healthcare and engineering sectors are paid much better, according to the latest findings by iMoney.

KUALA LUMPUR: People working in the country’s engineering, IT and healthcare sectors earn the most amount of money, according to the latest findings by leading financial comparison website iMoney.

It also said those working in the hotel and restaurant industry, the education and training sector, as well as training and human resources are paid the lowest.

The findings are based on a report by online career-recruiting company Jobstreet, which uses actual job advertisements.

iMoney said although the hotel and restaurant industries offered among the highest salaries for entry-level positions, it is also listed as the worst-paying industry overall.

The best paying entry-level jobs, it said, are in the engineering and construction sectors (RM5,533), hotels, restaurants and business management consultancies (RM5,100) and IT (RM4,600).

For junior executives, the best paid jobs are in the IT banking and financial sectors (RM6,500), healthcare retail and merchandise (RM5,950), and the IT and chemical industries (RM5,182).

Further up the ladder, the highest paying senior executive jobs are in the science and oil and gas industries (RM28,250), healthcare grooming, beauty and fitness business (RM15,167), and engineering consulting (RM11,333).

At for manager level jobs, the highest salaries come from the construction and oil and gas industries (RM15,611), accounting and jewellery sectors (RM14,500), and engineering and fast-moving consumer goods sectors (RM14,500).

For senior management positions, the highest salaries come from the administration and human resources, construction and engineering (RM35,000), followed by healthcare services (RM27,500), and the semiconductor industry (RM27,500).

iMoney said lower level positions in certain industries offered higher salaries compared to management-level jobs.

For example, the salary of a senior executive position in the oil and gas industry is higher than jobs in the managerial role.

The report also showed that the monthly average salary in Malaysia is RM5,000, while the maximum is RM83,333.

It also highlighted that six out of 10 Malaysian employees would change jobs for better salaries or benefits.

It said 40 per cent of employees would stay with their current employer for work-life balance, while a total of 38 per cent of employees would stay because of their salary packages.

By FERNANDO FONG.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2017/09/281649/here-are-10-highest-paying-jobs-malaysia-year

The making of an apprentice

Friday, September 15th, 2017

IF you’ve just graduated with a diploma or bachelor’s degree, there are many apprenticeship programmes available to kick-start your career.

An apprenticeship programme offers on-the-job training for those entering the workforce. It also helps individuals to put their academic skills to practical use in the workplace.

Such programmes help fresh graduates acquire the skills and knowledge to succeed in the industry; they earn while they learn on-the-job; get access to mentors; and gain confidence as well as a career path advantage.

They may be hired by the company depending on their performance during their apprenticeship.

Most of apprentice programmes involve working full-time and on a rotational basis, from department to department.

Normally a two-year programme, it varies with companies and one will be deployed to a department based on one’s credentials and strength, as revealed by the apprenticeship programme.

Apprenticeship programmes provide a springboard to a future career.

In Malaysia, there are various apprenticeship programmes such as Digi CXO Apprentice Programme, Global Maybank Apprentice Programme (GMAP) and Cement Industries of Malaysia (CIMA) Technical Apprenticeship Programme (TAP) and CIMB Fusion Programme.

The Digi CXO Apprentice Programme is the career kick-starter that has successfully shaped aspiring talent into potential leaders across the divisions of the company.

This year, seven apprentices were selected from a more diverse pool of candidates for a full-year mentorship programme with top management team members from Digi Telecommunications Sdn Bhd.

GMAP is a specially designed two-year on-the-job rotation programme which includes a three-month international assignment to encourage cross-border exposure and networking among young talents.

Targeting chemical, mechanical and electrical engineering graduates from local and international universities, TAP is an intensive three-year programme on the cement production process at a plant.

It is designed to help graduates chart a career in the cement industry, specifically in cement production technology.

The CIMB Fusion programme with PricewaterhouseCoopers is a four-year joint employment programme designed to give fresh graduates a unique opportunity to gain work experience in banking while also working towards their professional accounting qualifications.

Higher Ed speaks to apprentices from these programmes on their experiences and aspirations.

Building the Foundation:

NINE months ago, Henry Low, 21, applied for the GMAP.

The Bachelor of Business Accounting, Banking and Finance graduate from Monash University saw a great opportunity to develop leadership skills, build a strong foundation in the banking sector, as well as get mentored by some of the best talent in the industry.

“The company looks for candidates who are resilient, adaptive and innovative, and who value integrity.

“I believe I meet those criteria and I’m open to learning new things during my apprenticeship,” said Low.

The programme has exposed him to all aspects of the banking industry and provided him with the chance to specialise in his division of choice, investment banking.

He added that he has been privileged to have a great mentor to advise him and help him to grow.

“To be successful in any industry, you have to be able to work independently and take the initiative. For example, I familiarise myself with the work of the team members and offer to fill in if they need to prioritise another project.

“Working in a team allows me to accomplish more than I can on my own. However, it is important to understand the dynamics of the team and the difference in character and views of others.

“The important attributes of a good team player are communication, empathy and selflessness.”

The opportunity to play a meaningful role within the team motivates Low to work hard for its success.

“To cope under pressure I try to stay focused on the task at hand, and take a breather every so often.”

Low aspires to take on more responsibilities and fill a leadership role in the next three to five years.

Exploring Career Options:

FOR Athirah Azmi, 24, the GMAP allows her to learn about different divisions of the bank.

“It does not only allow me to explore career options but it is also a platform to network with like-minded peers both within the programme and the company.

“The apprenticeship has helped me to shape my career path. Joining the bank after graduation, I wasn’t sure of the area I would like to work in and GMAP allowed me to explore options,” said the International Studies and Political Science degree holder from the University of Chicago in the United States.”

She added: “A good apprentice is driven, passionate, eager to learn and ambitious.

“One needs to be a good team player and produce an outcome greater than what can be achieved individually. It means knowing and playing to each member’s strengths.”

For Athirah, a good team player has respect for others, is a good listener and works within the deadline.

She uses stress as a motivation to strive forward.

“I make a plan with a timeline. Each task lists out what needs to be done. It helps when I know exactly what I have to do.”

In three years, she hopes to climb the career ladder as a senior executive/analyst or assistant manager.

Honing Skills:

Digi CXO apprentice Andrea Ong, 23, prides herself on trying new things and is hungry to learn from a mentor.

“The programme taught me to cope under pressure — take a step back and look at a situation objectively to derive an unbiased and rational solution.

“If we subconsciously channel our negative emotions and frustrations when making decisions under pressure, it may worsen the problem and potentially cause conflict.

“So, I always try to remain calm and composed while under stress,” said Ong.

As Digi’s digital learning academy offers tech nano degrees to help employees learn new skills, Ong pursued a mobile development course while working as a Chief Digital Officer (CDO) Apprentice.

“I spent my weekends on the course. It was challenging to juggle both work and studies but, with hindsight, it was worth it.

By Zulita Mustafa.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/09/279277/making-apprentice

Unemployed grads remains an issue

Friday, September 8th, 2017

KOTA KINABALU: Graduates unable to gain employment remains an issue that needs to be addressed holistically. Former Higher Education Minister, Tan Sri Shafie Salleh (pic) said that it was among the issues he wanted to tackle when he was appointed Higher Education minister in 2004.

“According to studies conducted, the problem is still prevalent but what the government is trying to do now is to groom the students not to be employees but to be entrepreneurs.

“Therefore the entrepreneurship component must be injected into the higher education syllabus from the very beginning instead of when the students have already graduated.

“When I was in the USA, every student had a business card because they are taught the subject from the first year, and they are also encouraged to form a company within the campus.

“If we don’t do that, everyone will be depending on the government. The government has already been taking care of them since pregnancy, primary school, secondary school, and university.

“Without entrepreneurial skills, they would depend on the government on employment,” he said when met at the 11th Global Congress and Conferment Ceremony at Menara Tun Mustapha here yesterday.

Shafie also suggested that Malaysian graduates should emulate their counterparts in Australia who enrol into community colleges to acquire hands-on skills upon graduating with engineering degrees from universities.

That way, he said, will make the graduates more marketable as they do not only acquire theoretical knowledge from universities but also practical skills from the community colleges.

By ERIC BAGANG.

Read more @ http://www.newsabahtimes.com.my/nstweb/fullstory/18246

Don’t be replaced by a robot: Prepare yourself for the future of work

Sunday, August 27th, 2017
More than 200 courses are now being offered by all 20 Malaysian public universities through Malaysia MOOCs.
By adam brimo - August 23, 2017 @ 12:00pm

“A NATURAL leader”, “compassionate”, “critical thinker”, “entrepreneurial”, “responsible”, “has confidence in themselves and pride in their country”.

Who wouldn’t want to be described in such a way? Who wouldn’t want their children or students to exemplify these values?

From Sydney to Shah Alam to Shenzhen —no matter where you are from, we all aspire to develop the right balance between knowledge and skills, ethics and morality. We all strive to give our families the best possible quality of life and the benefits of our most difficult experiences.

In higher education, these values are known as soft skills. They take years to develop and are difficult to measure, yet they are the foundation to a civilised society and a requirement for a knowledge-based economy.

This is especially so as automation and robotics transform the world. These soft skills are becoming the main differentiator — not just between graduates — but between people and computers.

So, how do we safeguard ourselves from being replaced by robots?

As a parent, you can foster a sense of curiosity in your child from an early age by sharing ideas, learning about philosophy and history, and by reading books instead of only watching TV. You can also lead by example — by using more positive language and “looking on the bright side”, and by being a self-directed, lifelong-learner yourself.

When your child is close to completing secondary school, keep an open mind and encourage them to explore subjects and degrees offered by not just universities, but also the polytechnics and community colleges. Some of the world’s most successful CEOs, artists and entrepreneurs studied social sciences, languages or engineering. Andrea Jung studied literature, Jack Ma was an English teacher and Marissa Mayer studied science.

In the future, jobs will favour a responsive and flexible individual — someone who is able to draw from a wide range of knowledge, experiences and technical skills to solve problems. This then requires a more wholesome and multi-disciplinary approach to education.

For the first time in history, people of all ages are able to join university courses from across Malaysia and around the world for free — they are called Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs for short.

More than 200 courses are now being offered by all 20 Malaysian public universities through Malaysia MOOCs — an initiative by the Ministry of Higher Education, and the world’s first national MOOCs programme — to over 270,000 people from around the world.

You can now enrol in short courses to learn about Sea Turtle Biology from Universiti Malaysia Terengganu (UMT), Introductory Japanese from Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM), English in the Media from Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS) or Computer Programming from Universiti Teknikal Malaysia (UTeM) — all without first enrolling in a university degree.

Have you studied a few MOOCs and would now like a university degree?

The Malaysian Qualifications Agency (MQA) recently launched the world’s first MOOC credit transfer guideline, called APEL(C), which enables you to get up to 30 per cent of a degree through MOOCs or up to 70 per cent of a degree through your prior work experience. Thanks to this programme, you no longer have to study every subject at university to earn credit towards your degree — your prior experiential learning counts!

As a university or polytechnic student, you, too, should equip yourself for the future of work. You can look for opportunities to be more active and involved by joining a society, tutoring your fellow students, volunteering on campus, or by helping out in your local community. Creativity and innovation comes from having a wide variety of experiences and this is the best time of your life to do just that.

More than ever, getting straight A’s alone won’t guarantee you a great job — your academic skills must be matched with industry experience and an entrepreneurial mindset. Your experiences and contributions to the community won’t go unnoticed. These experiences are now being recorded at universities nationwide to produce your Integrated CGPA or iCGPA — which is a holistic measure of both your knowledge and your soft skills.

As a teacher, you hold an important role in society and in your community. Although some people might think that technology will replace teachers, that is not the case — teachers are more critical than ever.

By Adam Brimo.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/08/271456/dont-be-replaced-robot-prepare-yourself-future-work

Don’t be replaced by a robot: Prepare yourself for the future of work

Wednesday, August 23rd, 2017
More than 200 courses are now being offered by all 20 Malaysian public universities through Malaysia MOOCs.

“A NATURAL leader”, “compassionate”, “critical thinker”, “entrepreneurial”, “responsible”, “has confidence in themselves and pride in their country”.

Who wouldn’t want to be described in such a way? Who wouldn’t want their children or students to exemplify these values?

From Sydney to Shah Alam to Shenzhen —no matter where you are from, we all aspire to develop the right balance between knowledge and skills, ethics and morality. We all strive to give our families the best possible quality of life and the benefits of our most difficult experiences.

In higher education, these values are known as soft skills. They take years to develop and are difficult to measure, yet they are the foundation to a civilised society and a requirement for a knowledge-based economy.

This is especially so as automation and robotics transform the world. These soft skills are becoming the main differentiator — not just between graduates — but between people and computers.

So, how do we safeguard ourselves from being replaced by robots?

As a parent, you can foster a sense of curiosity in your child from an early age by sharing ideas, learning about philosophy and history, and by reading books instead of only watching TV. You can also lead by example — by using more positive language and “looking on the bright side”, and by being a self-directed, lifelong-learner yourself.

When your child is close to completing secondary school, keep an open mind and encourage them to explore subjects and degrees offered by not just universities, but also the polytechnics and community colleges. Some of the world’s most successful CEOs, artists and entrepreneurs studied social sciences, languages or engineering. Andrea Jung studied literature, Jack Ma was an English teacher and Marissa Mayer studied science.

In the future, jobs will favour a responsive and flexible individual — someone who is able to draw from a wide range of knowledge, experiences and technical skills to solve problems. This then requires a more wholesome and multi-disciplinary approach to education.

For the first time in history, people of all ages are able to join university courses from across Malaysia and around the world for free — they are called Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs for short.

More than 200 courses are now being offered by all 20 Malaysian public universities through Malaysia MOOCs — an initiative by the Ministry of Higher Education, and the world’s first national MOOCs programme — to over 270,000 people from around the world.

You can now enrol in short courses to learn about Sea Turtle Biology from Universiti Malaysia Terengganu (UMT), Introductory Japanese from Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM), English in the Media from Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS) or Computer Programming from Universiti Teknikal Malaysia (UTeM) — all without first enrolling in a university degree.

Have you studied a few MOOCs and would now like a university degree?

The Malaysian Qualifications Agency (MQA) recently launched the world’s first MOOC credit transfer guideline, called APEL(C), which enables you to get up to 30 per cent of a degree through MOOCs or up to 70 per cent of a degree through your prior work experience. Thanks to this programme, you no longer have to study every subject at university to earn credit towards your degree — your prior experiential learning counts!

As a university or polytechnic student, you, too, should equip yourself for the future of work. You can look for opportunities to be more active and involved by joining a society, tutoring your fellow students, volunteering on campus, or by helping out in your local community. Creativity and innovation comes from having a wide variety of experiences and this is the best time of your life to do just that.

More than ever, getting straight A’s alone won’t guarantee you a great job — your academic skills must be matched with industry experience and an entrepreneurial mindset. Your experiences and contributions to the community won’t go unnoticed. These experiences are now being recorded at universities nationwide to produce your Integrated CGPA or iCGPA — which is a holistic measure of both your knowledge and your soft skills.

As a teacher, you hold an important role in society and in your community. Although some people might think that technology will replace teachers, that is not the case — teachers are more critical than ever.

Teaching, more than any other profession, provides the ability and the opportunity to transform the lives of students by designing student-centred courses. Every time you encourage a student to share an idea, to create something new, or to reflect on an experience — you bring them closer to being an entrepreneur, a leader and a responsible citizen.

by By Adam Brimo.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/08/271456/dont-be-replaced-robot-prepare-yourself-future-work

54,103 Graduates Unemployed Six Months After Completing Studies

Saturday, August 19th, 2017

KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 17 (Bernama) — A total of 54,103 graduates were unemployed six months after they completed their studies last year, said Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh.

The number was based on the Graduands Detection Survey System (SKPG) which recorded 238,187 finishing their studies last year.

He said courses with the highest number of unemployed graduates were business administration, applied science, human resource management, accounting, arts and social science.

“This number did not comprise graduates from the public universities only but also from the private universities and colleges,” he said in reply to a question from Senator Datuk Ng Chiang Chin in the Dewan Negara today.

Idris said in tackling the issue of unemployed graduates, the Higher Education Ministry had implemented a number of programmes including the Integrated Cumulative Grade Point Average (iCGPA), Two Universities + Two Industries and the CEO Faculty.

BERNAMA.

Read More @ http://education.bernama.com/index.php?sid=news_content&id=1382965

Jobs, positions no longer guaranteed

Wednesday, July 12th, 2017

Kota Kinabalu: Some 60 per cent of today’s jobs and professions may go extinct in 30 years’ time, including some positions in the public service, said Chief Secretary to the Government, Tan Sri Ali Hamsa.

He said the possibility cannot be ruled out as human evolution has proved through the period of four industrial revolutions that saw the demise of certain employment activities and birth of new ones.

Malaysia has one of the highest number of people employed in the civil service.

“We don’t know how things will be by 2050 but 60 per cent of job positions may become extinct and replaced by new ones. We also don’t know what the new ones will be. We can only guess,” he told 1,200 State and Federal civil servants during the National Transformation 2050 (TN50) dialogue session held at Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS), Tuesday.

Ali said bearing such possibility in mind, civil servants must be able to envision the public service for the future in order to be relevant when the time comes.

“What kind of public service we want in 2050? This is why we’re here today. We want to hear your aspirations,” he said.

The dialogue was the second after one held in May in Putrajaya except this time it involved all categories in the State and Federal civil service in Sabah.

Ali and State Secretary Tan Sri Sukarti Wakiman moderated the session that saw active participation from the civil servants.

Among the key concerns highlighted by the participants were on sustainable development, security, education, house ownership, poverty, regional disparity, resilience to natural disaster and combating cyber and commercial crimes in Sabah.

Integrity of civil servants and zero corruption in civil service were also put up on the list as among their top aspirations.

He noted that many civil servants during the dialogue have put environmental sustainability also on top of their wish list for the future of Sabah while acknowledging the committed efforts taken by the current State leadership on the agenda.

Ali said all their inputs will be sent to a government agency to be clustered accordingly and announced by the government later.

TN50 is an initiative to plan for the future of Malaysia in the period 2020 to 2050 as the country strives to be amongst the top countries in the world in economic development, citizen well-being and innovation.

The process involves engaging all levels of the society, particularly youths, to gather their views and aspirations of how they would like to see the country and Sabah in particular by 2050.

by Leonard Alaza.

Read more @ http://www.dailyexpress.com.my/news.cfm?NewsID=118790