Archive for the ‘Literacy and Numeracy (Linus) Programme.’ Category

Further strengthening English language learning

Sunday, September 21st, 2014

Education Ministry’s Curriculum Development Division deputy director (Humanities) Shamsuri Sujak

PUTRAJAYA: THE Education Ministry, in its efforts to help pupils acquire basic English language literacy, has taken the initiative to expand the Literacy and Numeracy Screening (LINUS) programme to include English literacy.

Based on the achievement of LINUS in 2012 with a performance close to 100 per cent for Bahasa Malaysia literacy and numeracy, LINUS2.0 was implemented as a support programme to further improve English literacy among pupils in their first three years of primary school education.

The Ministry’s Curriculum Development Division Deputy Director (Humanities) Shamsuri Sujak said the aim of LINUS2.0 was to ensure all pupils, except special needs students, master Bahasa Malaysia literacy, English literacy, and numeracy at the end of Year Three.

“Under LINUS2.0, pupils in Year One, Year Two and Year Three will be screened twice a year, first in March and then in September to determine if they are progressing in Bahasa Malaysia literacy, English literacy, and numeracy at an expected pace.

“Pupils who fall behind will have to go through remedial classes up until they are qualified to be placed in the mainstream curriculum.” Shamsuri, who is also the programme manager of LINUS2.0, said the objectives of the early intervention programme was to improve the quality of teaching and learning in English and also to increase the effectiveness of teaching and learning in remedial English classes.

“All pupils who have not mastered English literacy will be supplied the English Literacy Pupil’s Module while the teachers who conduct the classes would be supplied with English Literacy Teacher’s Module.

“These modules were developed by the Curriculum Development Division involving the English language lecturers from universities and teacher training institutes as well as English teachers.” He added that in order to implement the teaching and learning remedial class, all Level One English teachers would be given remedial English courses, namely the LINUS2.0 disclosure course, the use of the English literacy module as well as remedial English course.

“The achievement of LINUS2.0’s English literacy since it started last year has so far been excellent.

For instance, the Year One pupils in 2013 who had their second screening in September 2013, based on their Writing, Reading, Speaking and Listening skills, achieved 63.3 per cent as compared with 50.1 per cent for the baseline conducted in March 2013.

“We hope that by the end of Year 3, all pupils will be able to master English literacy,” he said.

by BALQIS NASIR.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/node/35642

Improved Literacy and Numeracy Skills.

Saturday, June 14th, 2014

KUALA LUMPUR: THE Education Ministry’s Literacy and Numeracy Screening (Linus) programme has helped provide a stronger foundation to students in their first three years of primary school education.

Kuala Selangor district education officer Rohaizan Shahid said under Linus 2.0 students in Year One to Three will be screened twice a year to determine if they are progressing in Bahasa Melayu literacy, English literacy and Mathematics at an expected pace.

The objective of the programme was to ensure the student will have the basic literacy and numeracy and helping those fall behind will catch up to the mainstream education.

The programme was taken a step further last year with earlier intervention measures introduced for students to ensure they are able to read and write, as well as possess basic arithmetic knowledge.

Rohaizan, who is also a Facilinus (Linus facilitator), said her role was to provide support to the teachers who were involved in the programme.

“There is one-on-one technique coaching and mentoring for teachers.

We were not just monitoring the teachers but also supporting and motivating them. We will also see where the strength of the teacher is and give them suggestions to further improve their teaching skills,” she said.

She said Facilinus have to attend at least two courses annually to develop themselves.

“The State Education Department will also hold meetings monthly to come up with strategies to help teachers and students. The District Education Office also supports the facilinus by advising them on the best possible methods to guide teachers,” she said.

Rohaizan said data collected has shown that the programme was successful as the number of students who could not master basic literacy and numeracy continued to drop every year.

“Last year, Kuala Selangor district recorded a 99.5 per cent success rate for Bahasa Melayu literacy and 99.7 per cent success rate for numeracy thanks to the various activities that had been carried out.

by Teoh Pei Ying.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/node/2686

What teachers need to know about 21st Century Literacy.

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

Technology is not only changing the way education is perceived of today but is redefining the overall education scope. It has created new sciences and reorganized the relationships between long-standing disciplines and fields of inquiry. It has also created new cultural representations and industries. At this historical moment ,  knowledge itself is in transition as new systems for the generation, systematization, surveillance, and management of knowledge are beign created.

The questions worth posing here are: does literacy have the same meaning it had in the last century? Do we need a new literacy ? what is it to be a 21 st century literate ? is reading text and communicating a good and clear spoken language enough to define literacy ? What are the prerequisites of the 21st century literacy ? Is digital literacy part of it ? are we in front of one literacy or multiple literacies ?

These questions and many others are the centre of hot and rigorous debates inside the educational spheres and policy maker salons.

Read more @ http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2012/09/what-teachers-need-to-know-about-21st.html

Helping Students Find Their Writing Voices

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012
Students often have a difficult time finding their unique voice and style while writing. Help them out with these simple tips.

One of the most frustrating things for writing teachers is reading papers that simply lack style. When all of the research has been completed and incorporated into the paper correctly and all of the sentences are structured well, but the paper lacks some pizazz, it can be boring to grade. Similarly, when you know a student has a great personality, but that isn’t showing up in his or her writing, it can be upsetting to know that your students can do so, much better. If you are searching for ways to help your students find their voices, try stepping back from the analytical papers. When they write about themselves, students’ voices often shine through.

Who are You?

One of the most difficult questions for students to answer is: “Who are you?” Of course, they can give you their name, age, date of birth, and all sorts of other pertinent biographical information. However, when it gets down to the nitty-gritty stuff about what motivates them and makes them tick, this can be a difficult question to answer. Have your students explore who they are and what makes them unique. In doing this, through writing, students will start to see their personalities differently and, hopefully, be able to add a little flair to their writing. Furthermore, you can have students take on different, silly personalities in their writing. If they were an animal, who would they be? If they were a book, who would they be? Doing this can help your students break their comfort zones and think about their personalities differently.

Dear John

Writing letters is a great way for students to explore their writing passion. Have them write to a famous person they’ve always admired, and then the one they absolutely hate. Explore how their language changes between the two letters. Have them write to a family member, or a teacher. Talk about what differences in language they see as their audience change. When students know their audiences, it is much easier for them to add the kind of personality their audience wants to see. When you have them write a paper, then, have them define who they are writing it for before they even start. Then, reference the letters they wrote to give them an idea of what voice to use.

What Matters to You?

When students write about what matters most to them, they will often give you the best writing you’ve ever seen. Passionate responses are usually well-written responses, and you’ll get those when you ask questions that hit home. At the very least, when students have something to say about a given topic, it can be easier for them to get their ideas down, then work on their writing style.

Get the Words on Paper, Then Edit Them

The most valuable lesson students can learn is to write first, and edit later. Often, students think that, if the words don’t come out perfectly the first time, then they shouldn’t even write them down. More dangerously, students sometimes think that whatever comes out on the page the first time, is the end result of paper writing. To help with this, have students write nonstop for five minutes about their topics.

by Buzzle Staff.

LINUS programme records outstanding success

Friday, November 30th, 2012

KOTA KINABALU: The Literacy and Numeracy Screening (LINUS) programme has recorded a 99.8 per cent success rate for English literacy and 99.9 per cent success rate for numeracy this year.

The exemplary results from the initial LINUS programme have prompted the ministry to introduce LINUS 2.0, which includes Basic Literacy in English in 2013.

Director General of Education Malaysia, Tan Sri Abd Ghafar Mahmud said that LINUS 2.0 was part of the National Education Blueprint 2012, meant to tackle the problems with English literacy among students.

“The progress achieved has also contributed to the economic development and rising living standards, irrespective of race,” he said.

He added that according to UNESCO, every 1 per cent increase in literacy would contribute to an increase of 2.5 per cent of the Gross National Product (GNP).

He also mentioned in his speech that teachers play an important role to ensure the success of the individual and the achievement of national education goals.

“Without teachers who are committed, LINUS facilitators (FasiLINUS) would not be able to record such an excellent achievement in literacy and numeracy,” said Abd Ghafar.

Read more @ http://www.newsabahtimes.com.my/nstweb/fullstory/64096

LINUS programme to detect dyslexia symptoms

Monday, October 8th, 2012

KUCHING: The Education Ministry, through the Literacy and Numeracy Screening (LINUS) programme, has established an early detection ground for dyslexic students to ensure help is provided at an early stage.

All Year 1 to Year 3 students have to undergo a LINUS test to determine their level of competency in reading, writing and arithmetic (3R).

The Welfare, Women and Family Development Minister Datuk Fatimah Abdullah has shared that this system is trusted to be able to provide an early detection of children with dyslexia symptoms so they can be provided with special education to help them cope with their education needs.

“More public awareness needs to be created to help children with dyslexia in this state.

“They are intelligent but they sometimes find it hard to communicate or have problems with spelling.

“At times, our children are immediately accused of being slow, lazy and frequently punished in school because they fail to master reading and spelling.

“This is down to the teachers not being able to detect that those children may be troubled by dyslexia,” she said during a visit to the Dyslexia Association of Sarawak (DASwk) at their office.

In light of the situation, Fatimah has requested DASwk to step up efforts to create awareness and understanding among the society on dyslexia.

Online rehabilitation efforts should also be introduced to guide parents and teachers to assist children with dyslexia.

Awareness and information on rehabilitation should be shared with teachers in schools and parents who have children experiencing dyslexia,” she said.

Read more @ http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2012/10/8/nation/12127292&sec=nation

LINUS programme for early learning

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

LITERACY and numeracy lay the foundation for learning in primary education and beyond.

Reading, writing, arithmetic are implicit in the basic right to education.

Without these abilities, it is nearly impossible for students to attain higher education and function in the modern society. However, statistics showed that a sizeable student population in Malaysia are still ill-equipped with basic literacy and numeracy skills.

In 2008, 54,000 Year One pupils identified with low literary skills were enrolled in the Early Intervention Reading and Writing Class (KIA2M) while 117,000 Year Four pupils without basic numeracy skills were on the 3R Remedial Programme (Protim).

Under the Government Transformation Programme, the Education National Key Results Area (NKRA) aims to eradicate the dropout problem caused by students’ inability to cope with mainstream education.

In 2008 alone, 31,939 students dropped out from school at both the primary and secondary levels.

The Literacy and Numeracy Screening (LINUS) programme is aimed at ensuring that all Malaysian children acquire basic literacy and numeracy skills after three years of mainstream primary education.

The Education NKRA has set a 100% literacy and numeracy target for all Year Three pupils in Malaysia.

By basic literacy skills, the children are expected to have the ability to read, write and understand words, simple and complex sentences (using conjunctions) in Bahasa Malaysia and apply such knowledge in learning and everyday communication.

For basic numeracy, the children must be able to read, write, count and arrange (in order) whole numbers from one till 1,000 by Year Three.

They are also expected to demonstrate the ability to solve basic mathematical operations, apply mathematical skills and knowledge in everyday activities involving time, currencies and measurements.

Unlike previous efforts to address the numeracy and literacy problems, LINUS focuses on early intervention in the early primary years before the pupils enter Year Four.

Previous programmes either only focused on literacy skills (KIA2M) or conducted much later between Year Four to Six (Protim).

by Kang Soon Chen.

Read more @ http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2012/9/5/nation/11945027&sec=nation

On track for 100% literacy target next year

Sunday, January 15th, 2012

TEACHERS have long realised the illiteracy problem in school, says National Union of Teaching Profession (NUTP) secretary-general Lok Yim Pheng.

In fact, claims Lok, it was their concern that led to the introduction of the Education Ministry’s Literacy and Numeracy Screening (Linus) programme in 2010.

“It’s not because no one realised there was a problem or did not care. We realised that we had a problem; that’s why we have Linus.”

Introduced as part of the Education National Key Results Area (NKRA) of the Government Transformation Programme (GTP), Linus aims to provide a strong foundation in basic literacy and numeracy skills within the first three years of primary school education.

The programme conducts a screening process three times a year to identify students who face difficulties in reading, writing and basic arithmetic.

They are then enrolled in either a Linus-dedicated remedial class or a Special Education programme for those with learning disabilities.

In 2010, the programme aimed to achieve both literacy and numeracy rates of 90% for the then-Primary 1 students.

While the literacy target fell short by 5%, the numeracy target exceeded the original aim with a 91% rate.

In 2011, the Primary 2 students were set a higher target of 95% literacy and numeracy, while the current Primary 1 students must continue to uphold the strong results of 90% set for their cohorts this year.

To date, the students have shown some strong improvements, putting the 100% literacy and numeracy rate among Primary 3 students target right on track.

Read more @ http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2012/1/15/nation/10266985&sec=nation

Ensuring literacy with Linus

Monday, September 19th, 2011

MUAR: The Education Ministry has set the target for all primary school children to be literate by Year Three under the Literacy and Numeracy (Linus) programme.

Deputy Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin said the programme, which was introduced as a focus area of the Education National Key Results Area (NKRA) of the Government Transformation Pro­gramme (GTP), aimed to provide a strong foundation in basic literacy and numeracy skills within the first three years of primary school education for all Malaysian children.

Muhyiddin, who is also the Education Minister, said the ministry was concerned as there had been cases where students who entered Form One were still unable to read. He said the ministry intended to prevent this from reoccurring.

Students who face difficulties in reading, writing and basic arithmetic are enrolled in either a Linus-dedicated remedial class to improve their performance or a Special Education programme for those who have learning disabilities.

This approach has been designed to quickly identify problems at the early stage and rectify them before the students fall behind their peers.

To date, based on the two screenings done in March and June, Year Two students have already exceeded their 95% target, with a 95% for literacy rate and 97% for numeracy rate in the second screening.

Year One students have also shown some strong results, achieving a literacy rate of 83% and a numeracy rate of 90%.

by Noel Chang.

Read more @ http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2011/9/19/nation/9500625&sec=nation

Excellent scores for Linus in its first year

Monday, April 11th, 2011

KUALA LUMPUR: The Literacy and Numeracy (Linus) programme, an initiative under the GTP’s Education NKRA to improve student outcomes, is seeing encouraging results in its first year of implementation.

Designed to ensure a higher level of literacy and numeracy amongst school-going children, it achieved a score of 85% for literacy (with 406,980 pupils passing the screening) and 91% for numeracy (with 380,363 pupils passing the screening) in Primary 1.

The overarching rationale for the Education NKRA is to increase access to quality basic education in the country.

The Linus programme is to ensure that every child has the opportunity to be fully literate and numerate.

The government has trained 15,500 Linus teachers to conduct remedial classes for students who were found to be underperforming.

Dedicated facilitators, known as FasiLinus, who provide professional support were also deployed in schools to monitor, facilitate and support the Linus teachers.

Read more @ http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2011/4/11/nation/8431942&sec=nation