Archive for the ‘Ethics, Morality and Patriotism’ Category

Sabah polls: Police can deal with any threat – Deputy IGP

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2020

Datuk Seri Acryl Sani Abdullah Sani – Bernama file photo

KUALA LUMPUR (Sept 23): Police are capable of tackling any threat in the Sabah state election, including the reported plan by foreign elements to disrupt polling on Saturday, said Deputy Inspector-General of Police Datuk Seri Acryl Sani Abdullah Sani.

He said police do not take lightly information regarding the possible mass entry of elements from a neighbouring country to create trouble during the state election.

“We are always prepared to deal with any situation during the Sabah election, including by providing adequate assistance from Bukit Aman.

“We also have additional assistance from other security agencies such as the armed forces, Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency, Rela and Eastern Sabah Security Command (ESSCom), which are always prepared to maintain security before, during and after the Sabah polls,” he said in a press conference after a monthly assembly in Bukit Aman today.

Acryl Sani said the number of police personnel sent to Sabah for the polls was sufficient for the time being.

On Sunday, Sabah police commissioner Datuk Hazani Ghazali said they had received information that certain elements from a neighbouring country were planning to enter Sabah in large numbers to create trouble on polling day.

by Bernama.

Read more @ https://www.theborneopost.com/2020/09/23/sabah-polls-police-can-deal-with-any-threat-deputy-igp/

NST Leader: No safety net

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2020

This Sept 19 picture shows a concrete slab crashing on a car near the construction of the Sungai Besi-Ulu Klang Elevated Expressway (SUKE) in Kuala Lumpur.  -Pic courtesy of NST reader.

This Sept 19 picture shows a concrete slab crashing on a car near the construction of the Sungai Besi-Ulu Klang Elevated Expressway (SUKE) in Kuala Lumpur. -Pic courtesy of NST reader.

Malaysia’s construction industry often gets a bad press. And deservedly so.

Consider Sunday’s incident at the Middle Ring Road 2 in Bandar Tasik Selatan, Kuala Lumpur, where a parapet wall slab fell onto a moving car. Fortunately, the driver escaped with injuries.

Last year, a crane operator died at a construction site when the vehicle he was operating collapsed on him. The two accidents didn’t just happen. They were caused. So were the others in the history of the Malaysian construction industry.

And somewhere in the cause, there lurks a human agency. Call it negligence, lack of enforcement, or even greed, but where there are unsafe materials or machines, errant men are not far behind.

This is no rocket science. Developers and contractors who are worth the money they are paid should know that safety should be their number one concern. In fact, Malaysian developers and contractors are famous for worksite boards that scream, “Safety is our number one priority”. But their record over the years make them wooden lies.

Take accidents, just the fatal ones. According to Statista, a data portal, our construction industry has been a fatality-causing bad boy for long. In the five years beginning in 2014, the industry recorded 458 fatalities, with 111 of them in 2017 alone. In 2018, and that too in only 10 months, there were 84 deaths.

If negligence, lack of enforcement and greed are the causes, surely solutions are not hard to come by. Consider the last first.

Developers and contractors are in the construction business to make money. We accept this. After all, this is the nature of any business. What is unacceptable is when they place profit before safety. This is no mere speculation. How else would you explain a crane, which is approved to be on the worksite, collapsing on the operator? Or the assigning of one worker to man the diversion at the Middle Ring Road 2? What became of risk assessment and risk control? What happened to the rule that worksites must be hazard-free?

Some in the construction industry are cutting corners to fatten their profits. The authorities must come down hard on errant developers and contractors. Revocation of licences must be one of them. The law must make it expensive for errant developers and contractors to be in business.

Now for negligence at construction sites. Data on accidents at construction sites may point to them being unsafe places. They needn’t be if the workers are made aware of the hazards they may face through the employers’ safety policy and procedures. This is the responsibility of the developers and contractors. They must not allow any worker to do a job or operate an equipment that he is not qualified to do or operate.

As for the workers, it is in their interest to review the safety policies before they embark on any job. But ultimately, it all comes down to enforcement. The rising fatalities year-on-year alone suggest our authorities have not been as stringent as they should have been.

Self-regulation by itself isn’t enough. Errancy happens because the errant knows he can get away with it. Developers and contractors must be made to fear the law. They will so fear it if the regulators regulate, before and after the fact.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act 1994 gives the regulators wide powers. So do other statutes. They must use them.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/leaders/2020/09/626501/nst-leader-no-safety-net

Set up probe panel to identify hazards, ensure rules enforced

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2020
Imperative to ensure safety and health of workers and the public at construction sites. -NSTP/File picImperative to ensure safety and health of workers and the public at construction sites. -NSTP/File pic

LETTER: MANY are shocked and horrified with the incident where a parapet wall slab fell from the Sungai Besi-Ulu Klang Elevated Expressway (SUKE), which is under construction, and hit a car travelling along the Middle Ring Road 2 in Bandar Tasik Selatan on Sunday.

The woman driver escaped death and sustained injury on the hand. It is even more shocking that this is not the first construction accident at the same construction project site.

It was also reported that a piling steel frame fell and injured three construction workers for the same SUKE construction project on Aug 16.

Construction sites create a risk not only for construction workers, but also for the people who move around the sites or live near them. The public must be protected from construction hazards.

The Department of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH) and other government agencies have regulations that lay down the legal requirements to ensure the safety and health of not only the workers, but also the public as well.

For a construction project, it is important that the structure to be built is designed and constructed accordingly so that workers and those at the construction site are protected from hazards.

The risk management process should be undertaken to identify hazards and control measures. The Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB) has published the Construction Activities Risk Assessment — Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment and Risk Control and guidelines on prevention of fall at construction sites to help construction stakeholders adopt and implement risk management and best safety practices.

An investigation committee should be formed to identify and assess hazards and formulate control measures to prevent similar incidents from recurring.

DOSH, CIDB and related government regulating bodies should take necessary measures to ensure all OSH regulations and guidelines are implemented at construction sites.

by WONG CHEE FUI.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2020/09/626502/set-probe-panel-identify-hazards-ensure-rules-enforced

Islamic fintech answer to economic stability

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020
Malaysians should be proud to welcome the first digital Sukuk Prihatin, the beginning of sharing and trust economy in the new digital edge. - BLOOMBERG photoMalaysians should be proud to welcome the first digital Sukuk Prihatin, the beginning of sharing and trust economy in the new digital edge. – BLOOMBERG photo

MALAYSIANS should be proud to welcome the first digital Sukuk Prihatin, the beginning of sharing and trust economy in the new digital edge. This marks a step forward in spurring the development programme and stimulus package to our economy.

Sharing is productive deeds that have economic values, in enjoining the spirit of Islamic fintech and hopefully be the best remedy in overcoming the economic slowdown.

In a recent statement by Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM), the Malaysian economy declined by 17 per cent in the second quarter of 2020, due to the sudden cessation of economic activity when the country was placed under the Movement Control Order (PKP) starting March 2020. Certain industries have partly recovered given the never-ending support by the government and utilising of technological advancement.

The government initiatives in undertaking the Covid-19 pandemic impact is quite impressive from the implementation of the moratorium, the Prihatin Rakyat Economic Stimulus Package for the B40 income group, PENJANA to the consultations and initiatives to SMEs and many more.

It is expected that by the end of the year or so, the country will achieve a significant improvement and fully recover by the second quarter of 2021.

Fintech or financial technology is one way or another that can be exploited to plot Malaysia back on international limelight. We need to do something different in approaching fintech by adding some values as prescribed by Islam. For instance, the government effort and initiative should be regarded as part of Islamic fintech approach.

Indeed, the digital economy is not the talking point, but rather being about the need to rethink the economic value in it. The market is about capital-labour relations, internal governance on how businesses behave matters. As famously quoted by Warren Buffet, “Price is what you pay, value is what you get.” We want to pay less but expect maximum value.

Indeed, we have experienced value deterioration for close example is fiat currency recently due to the pandemic. According to economists, this is among others, the reason why the price of gold has reached new record high. Most investors diverted their value investment to the precious metal as the sovereignty of paper money were at stake particularly the USD & EUR.

The currencies of these countries, the US and the European Union, have been in an economic suppression. We cannot afford any debt to fund the economic recovery and Islam is not encouraging debt. The country has enough overleveraging in the expenses of development. Luckily, we are not entrapped in the debt-based initiative.

We all know that China’s expansion involves offering fund to needy countries such as Djibouti, Tonga, Maldives, the Republic of the Congo, Kyrgyzstan, Cambodia, Niger, Loas, Zambia, Samoa, Vanuatu and Mongolia.

China ambitiously will repeat history from being the first country to use “flying currency” in note form in the year 806 AD, and the real paper money in 1023AD during the Song dynasty and now the first country to fully adopt its Yuan digital currency, not only throughout China but probably to be a new international digital currency as well.

Be it coin, cash, card or code (QR code), the real value is not the paper or numbers but our worth. It is insane if we wake up in the morning doing the same thing we do and expect different results. Success is a step of progress moving forward toward our goal.

We must set a goal to inculcate value in economy. Gratefulness and compassion, as human exclusive values, will surely boost the relationship between the government and people, and provide the economic stability in the long run.

Allah says “If you are grateful, I will add more (favours) unto you; but if you show ingratitude, truly My punishment is terrible indeed” (Ibrahim, (4): 7). “If you reject (Allah), truly Allah has no need of you; but He likes not ingratitude from His slaves; if you are grateful, He is pleased with you” (al-Zumar (39): 7).

We need to rediscover the productive and economic value from humanity as prescribed by Islam. God consciousness, truthfulness, compassionate, gratefulness and good deeds are the Islamic tenets and have its own economic value.

By Mohd Noor Omar.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2020/09/626321/islamic-fintech-answer-economic-stability

How Covid-19 is killing good manners – and what to do about it

Monday, September 21st, 2020
But the end of the handshake could lead to information loss. Across a variety of contexts, the act of shaking hands makes a difference in our evaluations of strangers.  - Bloomberg PicBut the end of the handshake could lead to information loss. Across a variety of contexts, the act of shaking hands makes a difference in our evaluations of strangers. – Bloomberg Pic

ONE casualty of the current pandemic is likely to be good manners.

True, manners and civility have been dying for ages, but Covid-19 is sure to finish them off. Which is too bad.

We often think of manners and civility as the same thing, but the first is only a part of the second. Civility is the sum of all the sacrifices that we make for the sake of living in a workable society.

Manners matter to civility not only because they are valuable in themselves (although they may be) but because they have traditionally constituted what the historian Arthur Schlesinger Sr. described as our “letter of introduction” to strangers.

At a time when information about people was relatively expensive, Schlesinger saw good manners as signalling what sort of people we were.

In the post-pandemic era, manners will be different because our letters of introduction will convey a different message. What we’ll largely be doing – what we’re doing already – is signalling that what we care about most is our own safety and that of our loved ones.

Social customs can be sticky, but I predict some pandemic-induced changes will last.

Diffidence will rise. We will no longer be judged unfriendly for refusing to strike up conversations with strangers, masked or not. We’ll be less likely to hand cash to the homeless.

We’ll be wary of crowds, though not entirely: Whether via vaccine or herd immunity or virus burnout, bars and restaurants and movie theatres will eventually fill.

But away from the close-quarter destinations we choose for ourselves, altering our path to avoid others will no longer be seen as rude.

The Golden Rule will crumble. “No, please, after you” will die out. Nobody will hold the door for anybody else because nobody will want to touch the handle that long. To step aside and let someone pass is to let that person get too close. No longer will we hesitate to press the elevator’s “door close” button in a late-arriving rider’s face, or to demand that the manager put a coughing patron out of the restaurant.

As memories of pandemic shortages linger, we’ll abandon leaving as much and as good for others. We’ll become hoarders.

Homes will be well stocked with paper goods. Cleaning products will vanish from the shelves as rapidly as they appear. (Yes, we could reduce this behaviour by letting the prices of sought-after goods rise, which would lead to … oh, never mind.)

Now for the hard one: the handshake is dead. Everybody says so. (Even Dr Fauci.) But from the point of view of civility, this will create a problem. Shaking hands traditionally signalled a lack of aggression. The open palm holds no weapon, and, while locked with someone else’s, cannot draw one. Bumping fists or elbows cannot carry the same signal. Maybe we’ll make no physical contact with strangers at all. Expect a lot more smiling and bowing.

But the end of the handshake could lead to information loss. Across a variety of contexts, the act of shaking hands makes a difference in our evaluations of strangers. Some non-Western cultures employ a complex spectrum of tactile pressures to send various social signals through the handshake.

Consider business. Researchers say that the “quality” of handshakes between interviewers and interviewees strongly influences hiring recommendations – at least when the interviewees are male. Handshakes also matter in business negotiations. During past pandemics, executives continued to symbolise the deal with a clasping of hands even when other people were shying away from the practice. (No, it’s not a lack of understanding. The ability of hand-to-hand contact to transmit infection has been known for a century or more.)

Then there’s diplomacy. Consider the iconic 1993 photograph of Yasser Arafat and Yitzhak Rabin shaking hands at the White House to symbolise their agreement to the Camp David Accords.

Around the world, the image was cited as evidence that the violent standoff in the Middle East would finally change.

The handshake mattered precisely because it was so hard to believe it had happened. Socially distance the two leaders and the photograph becomes incomprehensible, signalling nothing in particular. (That the Accords ultimately failed doesn’t change the significance of the image. The struggle for peace is like Camus’s view of Sisyphus: the struggle itself toward the heights is what matters, even if the boulder ultimately rolls back down the hill.)

All of which leads us back to civility. If civility implies sacrifice, which sacrifices will survive? Unless things normalise swiftly, I suspect that the answer is, not many – at least among the public at large.

We could imagine a bifurcated future, however, in which traditional manners continue fading from popular use but survive in such specialised arenas as business and international relations. Shaking hands, sitting in close proximity and holding the door might be preserved in those arenas, just as they’ve retained archaic formalisms in contracts and flowery language in diplomatic notes.

That isn’t to say that we won’t develop new norms of civility. Retail shoppers, for instance, nowadays wait with visible patience for others to clear narrow aisles. But the norm involved is ultimately self-protective. (As is, it seems, wearing a mask.)

That’s why I expect to see a widening divide between a coarser world of everyday interaction and a certain gentility among those whose roles call for it. Which is perhaps another way of saying that from here on in, a lot fewer people will carry letters of introduction. Good for our physical health, perhaps, but not so good for civility.

By Stephen L Carter, BLOOMBERG.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2020/09/626051/how-covid-19-killing-good-manners-%E2%80%93-and-what-do-about-it

‘Irresponsible parties are exploiting racial, religious matters’

Sunday, September 20th, 2020
Race and religious matters must never be exploited into issues affecting national unity, Malaysia Unity Foundation trustee Tan Sri Lee Lam Thye said today.   - NSTP/MAHZIR MAT ISARace and religious matters must never be exploited into issues affecting national unity, Malaysia Unity Foundation trustee Tan Sri Lee Lam Thye said today. – NSTP/MAHZIR MAT ISA

KUALA LUMPUR: Race and religious matters must never be exploited into issues affecting national unity, Malaysia Unity Foundation trustee Tan Sri Lee Lam Thye said today.

Lee stressed that irresponsible actions and racial utterances that have given rise to serious consequences, affecting inter-racial harmony and national unity, must be halted.

He said as Malaysians recently celebrated the 57th anniversary of the formation of Malaysia and 63rd anniversary of Merdeka, it is an opportune moment to reflect on what we have done well, and what we might not have.

“We have made tremendous progress in many fields of national development for which we must rightly be proud. But what are our major shortcomings and challenges in the years ahead?

“I don’t think many will disagree that we have not done too well in nurturing national unity. That has been our biggest challenge for many years and will remain so for many years to come if we do not embark on the right measures to address the issue.

“After all these years, we are still grappling with issues regarding race and religion that are brought up from time to time by irresponsible people,” he said in a statement today.

He said Malaysia, a diverse country, must implement moderation as the fundamental principle for greater integration and unity.

He stressed that moderation must not be a mere slogan, but reflected in all government policies to be implemented for the benefit of the nation.

“The irresponsible actions and racial utterances that have given rise to serious consequences affecting inter-racial harmony and national unity must be halted. Since these actions have largely gone unchecked, they have contributed to tension and ill-feeling, resulting in social polarisation.

“Needless to say, this is a very unhealthy situation. We don’t need these issues, especially at challenging times like this,” he said.

He said it was crucial for the government to pay serious attention to this seemingly escalating problem.

“It should consider reviving the Rukun Negara to negate such negativity. Rekindle the Rukun Negara spirit and make it a way of life for all.

“The immediate task facing us all, especially political leaders, is to stop the drift towards race-baiting, and racial polarisation. We should instead focus on our commonalities as expounded in the five principles of our Rukun Negara.”

Lee said it is not the right time to applaud “ethnic heroes” but to identify more “ethnic bridge-builders” to break down the serious racial divide in the larger interest of improving ethnic relations in the country.

“We need more mature politicians and supporters. We need the politics of civility.

“It is now time for Malaysians to be aware and take a firm stand against divisive forces that can tear apart our social fabric and cause disunity. Multiracial living is part of our history and heritage.

“Let’s always remember that ‘United we stand, divided we fall’. Unity is a priceless gift. We must never lose it.”

BNew Straits Times.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2020/09/625910/irresponsible-parties-are-exploiting-racial-religious-matters

IWK denies its sewage treatment plant behind latest Sungai Gong pollution

Sunday, September 20th, 2020
Indah Water Konsortium Sdn Bhd (IWK) today denied that the black discolouration of water at Sungai Gong yesterday was due to effluent discharge from its Rawang Integrated Industrial Park Sewage Treatment Plant (GBK134). - NSTP /ZUNNUR AL SHAFIQIndah Water Konsortium Sdn Bhd (IWK) today denied that the black discolouration of water at Sungai Gong yesterday was due to effluent discharge from its Rawang Integrated Industrial Park Sewage Treatment Plant (GBK134). – NSTP /ZUNNUR AL SHAFIQ

KUALA LUMPUR: Indah Water Konsortium Sdn Bhd (IWK) today denied that the black discolouration of water at Sungai Gong yesterday was due to effluent discharge from its Rawang Integrated Industrial Park Sewage Treatment Plant (GBK134).

In a statement today, IWK said it believes that the effluent was released by an illegal waste disposal unit near the plant, and that the water had turned a deep yellow.

IWK chief executive officer Narendran Maniam said chemical dosage works were immediately carried out to control the situation.

He said staff at the plant first noticed that non-sewage waste was present in the plant’s inlet chamber, causing water in the final stage of treatment at the plant to be imbued a deep yellow.

Accordingly, IWK staff immediately began cleaning operations, which are still ongoing, and are expected to be completed later today.

“Our staff at the plant are monitoring and controlling the influx of wastewater into the plant. We believe there was illegal waste disposal near our plant, causing it to flow into our plant,” Narendran added.

The treatment plant is an ‘oxidation ditch (OD) plant’ that connects to 11,106 households, covering only industrial areas.

In a statement yesterday, the Selangor Water Management Authority (Luas) said it received a report on the discolouration of water in Sungai Gong, and based on investigations, found that the foamy and coloured effluent had been discharged from the IWK sewage treatment plant.

Narendran said Luas’ statement will confuse the public, as the real cause of the pollution was probably illegal waste disposal.

He said sewage treatment plants are designed to treat wastewater, and are not capable of treating chemicals or other wastes illegally discharged into the sewer pipeline.

“It is frustrating that IWK often becomes an easy target for any water pollution incident, such as in this case, without any thorough investigation.”

He said IWK has always ensured that operation and maintenance works at all 7,000 plants under its supervision are in accordance with the specifications and procedures set by the authorities.

“Non-sewage waste is often placed in sewer chambers by irresponsible parties. Hence, it is better for all parties to work together in addressing the issue of actual pollution,” added Narendran.

Disposal of non-sewage waste is an offence under the Water Services Industry Act 2006 (WSIA 2006).

By New Straits Times.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2020/09/625887/iwk-denies-its-sewage-treatment-plant-behind-latest-sungai-gong-pollution

SUKE accident: DBKL told to review laws governing construction sites

Sunday, September 20th, 2020
Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) and related agencies have been asked to review regulations governing construction sites to further enhance safety, said Federal Territories Minister Tan Sri Annuar Musa. - Bernama picKuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) and related agencies have been asked to review regulations governing construction sites to further enhance safety, said Federal Territories Minister Tan Sri Annuar Musa. – Bernama pic

KUALA LUMPUR: Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) and related agencies have been asked to review regulations governing construction sites to further enhance safety, said Federal Territories Minister Tan Sri Annuar Musa.

This comes after a parapet wall slab from the under-construction Sungai Besi-Ulu Klang Elevated Expressway (SUKE) came loose and fell onto a moving car along the Middle Ring Road 2 (MRR2), yesterday afternoon.

Annuar said the review will include fines and heavier penalties to prevent similar incidents from recurring.

“I want DBKL and the relevant agencies to tighten safety aspects at construction sites as well as other matters related to public safety.

“Review the rules, including (introducing) stiffer penalties,” he said via his official Twitter account, today.

In the incident at 5.45pm yesterday, a woman driving her Perodua Myvi along the MRR2 from Sungai Besi towards Ampang was nearing a petrol station in Bandar Tasik Selatan when the one-metre square of concrete fell onto her car, badly crushing it.

However, the 25-year-old victim was rescued by the public and only suffered injuries to her hand. She was sent to the Tuanku Muhkriz Chancellor Hospital (HUKM) for treatment.

by Bernama

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2020/09/625889/suke-accident-dbkl-told-review-laws-governing-construction-sites

PM: No tolerance for extremist practices that threaten public order

Saturday, September 19th, 2020

Putrajaya: The government will not compromise on “extremist” practises that threaten racial harmony, public order and the country’s security,” Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin said today.

He reminded all against taking extremist approaches that could cause unrest among Malaysia’s multiracial society.

“We must always remember that Malaysia is a multiracial country that gives priority to moderation and harmonious relations among different races and religions,” he said in his speech after attending a special meeting with representatives from Yayasan Dakwah Islamiah Malaysia (Yadim).

Muhyiddin also underscored the importance of defending Islam as the religion of the federation; the sacrosanctity of the royal institution and the Yang di-Pertuan Agong as ruler and the country’s head of Islam; the need to uphold Islamic law, the obligation to empower Islamic education, the importance of strengthening the unity of the ummah, and the need to enhance alms and wakaf institutions

He said the government welcomes feedback and collaborations with non-governmental organisations (NGOs) for the betterment of the Muslim community.

Yadim president Nasrudin Hassan earlier submitted seven resolutions to Muhyiddin to achieve the aims he had outlined.

By Nuradzimmah Daim.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2020/09/625704/pm-no-tolerance-extremist-practices-threaten-public-order

Importance of spirituality

Friday, September 18th, 2020
Religious teaching may make people understand they have the ability to be “human” as divinity is their true, pure, and primordial essence, the “fitra”, as Islam calls it. - NSTP file picReligious teaching may make people understand they have the ability to be “human” as divinity is their true, pure, and primordial essence, the “fitra”, as Islam calls it. – NSTP file pic

LETTERS: People are facing many challenges today — cultural, political, religious tension and inequality — because we are letting technology steer and navigate us. We are also detached and separated from the sacred treasures — the significance, value and purpose of life — that exist in all religions, traditions and cultures.

Human beings are born with three essential realms, namely physical, intellectual, and spiritual. For the physical realm, it is better characterised as comprising the intestinal, central nervous organ, renal, endocrine, reproductive and lymphoid.

The second realm is intellectual, where a brain performs its part. The third one is the spiritual realm.

The latter complements the physical and intellectual realms. This spiritual domain places the heart or the “qalb” in Arabic. In the heart, resides the spirit or the soul. The success of the function of the heart can be seen through “akhlaq” (moral deeds) that are capable of producing pure values or virtues. Only when these three realms are together can an individual be complete.

The true meaning, purpose and value of life is also to be established when these three domains are properly exercised.

To face today’s challenges, we must re-establish the bond between man and nature, man and mankind, man and God.

Spirituality is a strong human experience aspect.

The spiritual dimension is also responsible for catching and actualising human desire. It has a capacity to manifest such attributes as sacredness, awareness, vision, wisdom, purpose, love, and the search for meaning, purpose, value and truth of life.

Spirituality doesn’t merely stand for faith or religion. Religion is crucially important for one’s personal growth and development because it provides a guideline for people to act correctly on this planet. It needs to put a consideration of a distinction between religion and spirituality.

Belonging to a certain religious principle expresses itself as the observance of dogmatic principles and certain practices. Spirituality, however, emphasises a greater awareness and desire for betterment of the self.

Religious values in the spiritual dimension can provide guidance for sustainable lifestyle and wellbeing of society.

The ultimate purpose of religion is not only about God and rituals, but also about a relationship with the environment, nature and fellow human beings.

To conclude, spirituality is a quality one should look forward to achieving.

Religious teaching may make people understand they have the ability to be “human” as divinity is their true, pure, and primordial essence, the “fitra”, as Islam calls it. However, it is the upper self or the spiritual wisdom which dwells in every soul’s surface that makes their life meaningful, purposeful and valuable.

by RATNA ROSHIDA AB RAZAK.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2020/09/625375/importance-spirituality