Archive for the ‘Celebrating Diversity’ Category

NST Leader: ‘Rumah Terbuka’ uniquely Malaysian

Monday, June 24th, 2019
A Hari Raya open house brings people together from all walks of life. — NSTP Archive

“NO man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.” This phrase may well explain the popularity of the open house among Malaysians.

It’s human nature to want to be among people to socialise, to bond and to catch up with news, or even gossip. Human beings depend on one another to feel alive and be in harmony with their surroundings.

Nt only at Hari Raya open houses do we bond with family and friends, it is also done during other religious festivals — Christmas, Chinese New Year, Deepavali — it’s uniquely Malaysian.

A Hari Raya open house brings people together from all walks of life, regardless of religion. A smorgasbord of local favourites like lemangketupat, rendang and peanut sauce are served for all and sundry.

For the average Malay, it’s condensing time in manageable capsules to meet family and relatives to reaffirm the “silaturrahim” (bonding). In the old days, on the first day of Syawal, one visits family and friends to mend bridges, “bermaaf-maafan” (seek forgiveness) — an occasion to “zeroize” accounts.

A demonstration that relations are healed where there has been discord. In terms of symbolism, it’s about establishing peace in society. It’s obligatory too, to celebrate the first day as a sign of victory over a personal jihad (the end of fasting in Ramadan).

The parameters of the celebration are well defined: a time of forgiving, of rebuilding and maintaining relationships, and a time for charity.

Check your phone-calendar. You may be required to present yourself at an open house somewhere today. Courtesy may triumph over the horrendous traffic jam as one manoeuvres his way from the office to the venue.

At corporate open houses, huge crowds gather — time for business networking and socialising. New friends are made, old ties are renewed — a productive endeavour that requires particular traits, but necessary in today’s world.

In recent times, though, some open houses have become impersonal. Due to time constraints, monstrous ones are planned where everyone comes for the food and sights, but only a handful for the company and camaraderie.

Gone is the spirit and human touch, it has become matter-of-factly. There’s the worry the tradition may fade into the woodwork because of attachment to digital devices. If open houses cannot return us to a world where intrusion is alien, then they have no use.

The New Straits Times believes a renewed appreciation of an age-old and priceless tradition may just bring back the human touch. Plan and time the events well so they do not clash with productive hours at the office. Never mind the swollen city streets and highways on weekends, make an effort to present yourself.

At the event, praise the host, socialise, pick up some culinary skills, give exquisite comments about the food. Malaysians should attempt at least one, if not two, open house in their lifetime

A Hari Raya open house brings people together from all walks of life. — NSTP Archive
June 24, 2019 @ 12:00am

“NO man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.” This phrase may well explain the popularity of the open house among Malaysians.

It’s human nature to want to be among people to socialise, to bond and to catch up with news, or even gossip. Human beings depend on one another to feel alive and be in harmony with their surroundings.

Not only at Hari Raya open houses do we bond with family and friends, it is also done during other religious festivals — Christmas, Chinese New Year, Deepavali — it’s uniquely Malaysian.

A Hari Raya open house brings people together from all walks of life, regardless of religion. A smorgasbord of local favourites like lemangketupat, rendang and peanut sauce are served for all and sundry.

For the average Malay, it’s condensing time in manageable capsules to meet family and relatives to reaffirm the “silaturrahim” (bonding). In the old days, on the first day of Syawal, one visits family and friends to mend bridges, “bermaaf-maafan” (seek forgiveness) — an occasion to “zeroize” accounts.

A demonstration that relations are healed where there has been discord. In terms of symbolism, it’s about establishing peace in society. It’s obligatory too, to celebrate the first day as a sign of victory over a personal jihad (the end of fasting in Ramadan).

The parameters of the celebration are well defined: a time of forgiving, of rebuilding and maintaining relationships, and a time for charity.

Check your phone-calendar. You may be required to present yourself at an open house somewhere today. Courtesy may triumph over the horrendous traffic jam as one manoeuvres his way from the office to the venue.

At corporate open houses, huge crowds gather — time for business networking and socialising. New friends are made, old ties are renewed — a productive endeavour that requires particular traits, but necessary in today’s world.

In recent times, though, some open houses have become impersonal. Due to time constraints, monstrous ones are planned where everyone comes for the food and sights, but only a handful for the company and camaraderie.

Gone is the spirit and human touch, it has become matter-of-factly. There’s the worry the tradition may fade into the woodwork because of attachment to digital devices. If open houses cannot return us to a world where intrusion is alien, then they have no use.

The New Straits Times believes a renewed appreciation of an age-old and priceless tradition may just bring back the human touch. Plan and time the events well so they do not clash with productive hours at the office. Never mind the swollen city streets and highways on weekends, make an effort to present yourself.

At the event, praise the host, socialise, pick up some culinary skills, give exquisite comments about the food. Malaysians should attempt at least one, if not two, open house in their lifetime.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/leaders/2019/06/498553/nst-leader-rumah-terbuka-uniquely-malaysian

Unity in Raya forgiveness

Friday, June 7th, 2019

TOWARDS the end of Ramadan, there were different views expressed about the permissibility of Muslims breaking fast in buildings in (or near) non-Muslim places of worship, about Muslims breaking fast with food cooked and distributed by non-Muslims, and about a supposed general trend of events that include people of different faiths gaining in popularity that might “threaten” the faith of Muslims.

I was reminded of the story of the Caliph Omar who refused to pray in a church – not because he felt that Muslims might therefore lose their faith, but because he was afraid Muslims would then take over the building.

I also recalled examples from my travels and memories of countries where Muslims are a minority: in Cologne, Germany, where the cathedral hosted the breaking of fast for Muslims for many years before a mosque was built; the many kindnesses of my non-Muslim hosts and friends during Ramadan when I was a young student in rural England; and many dialogues and interactions involving people of different religions that have – in my experience – only ever increased understanding and tolerance while fostering greater appreciation of one’s own beliefs.

The suspicion that many pole­mics on these issues are often driven by political interests is sharply brought into focus when Hari Raya arrives.

Indeed, this Hijrah year of 1440 has seen the usual traditions being observed.

The visit to the graves of family members took place before the final breaking of fast at Maghrib, with the first takbir following Isyak prayers.

After that, greetings and tokens of appreciation were distributed to the various teams of staff that work in, and more generally support, the Istana.

Early the next morning, after familial exchanges of forgiveness, Aidilfitri prayers were performed at the Masjid Diraja Tuanku Munawir, its congregation spilling beyond its walls as a result of the temporary urban-rural shift that seizes the country during this festive season.

Every year, despite the political temperature of the country, I am comforted by the fact that for most Muslim Malays, it is the performance of these traditions (no doubt with many variations across families) that most defines what it means to be Muslim and Malay – and not the politically charged rhetoric of division and intolerance.

This fact is further exemplified by what follows immediately after the observance of these most emblematic of rituals: the open house.

In the case of Seri Menanti, that means about 12,000 people from across Negri Sembilan assembling at the Istana Besar, enjoying local delicacies in the presence of their Ruler.

And what is remarkable – though one has to think about it – is how unremarkable it is that those in attendance come from all ethnic and religious backgrounds and a spectrum of educational, career and life experiences.

But all want to share in the joy that Hari Raya provides: a vision of Malaysia encapsulated, a celebration of unity exemplified.

Yet we must be wary when others appeal for “unity”, for the word has many different meanings and applications.

Do they mean unity among a particular subset of Malaysians, or unity across all Malaysians?

Even if the former, do they mean unity that inspires and promotes cooperation, or unity in opposition to those regarded as different?

Do they mean unity according to government-mandated labels, or unity based on values that people choose to have?

Even if the latter, do they mean unity under a single political affiliation, or do they recognise that unity towards values does not necessarily mean political uniformity?

Sometimes, amidst the gorging on rendang and satay, one too easily forgets the abstentions of fasting and the true purpose of Ramadan.

The usual greeting, now reduced to #shrmzb, loses its literal but profound meaning.

Thus, as we enter the open house season, it may be beneficial to remember that Aidilfitri encourages an expression of unity that is inherently individualistic, entirely voluntary and yet, deeply profound. And it is exercisable by Muslims as well as non-Muslims.

It is about seeking forgiveness from others for the wrongdoings that one may have committed.

When offered with genuine intention, and when received with honest sincerity, a bond between two people is strengthened (or at least repaired).

When replicated millions of times in our diverse nation, it surely helps solidify the foundations of shared citizenship.

Over the last year, I know that I have made many decisions that have negatively impacted others, that my words and actions may have caused offence, and that many promises could have been better kept. To you, I say Selamat Hari Raya, maaf zahir dan batin.

By Tunku Zain Al-’Abidin
Read more @
https://www.thestar.com.my/opinion/columnists/abidinideas/2019/06/07/unity-in-raya-forgiveness/#qVD6rXklBqm5×1cK.99

Unity bedrock for progress: CM

Saturday, June 1st, 2019

PENAMPANG: Unity among people of diverse ethnics, cultures, religions and beliefs is the best recipe for developing Sabah into a prosperous state, said Chief Minister Datuk Seri Mohd Shafie Apdal.

He said such unity as displayed in the Tadau Kaamatan, celebrated not only in Sabah but also in other states, can enable the State Government develop the State to be much better than Korea, Japan and even Singapore.

“We want this celebration to become a platform for uniting further all people in Sabah. We use it as a foundation for us to make Sabah progress forward.

“I am confident that Sabah has this recipe in its effort to become a developed state.

“We can develop Sabah much better than Korea, Japan and even Singapore, because we are confident we have the recipe, raw materials, culture, tourism products and only that what is most important is having the right mindset in human resources.

“We have sufficient wealth to place Sabah as an industrial state. I am confident of this, when we have unity and right mindset, we can take care of our people,” he said, when closing the State-level Tadau Kaamatan celebration at the Kadazandusun Cultural Association (KDCA) Hongkod Koisaan hall, Friday.

Huguan Siou, Tan Sri Joseph Pairin Kitingan, State Infrastructure Development Minister Datuk Peter Anthony, who is also State Tadau Kaamatan Celebration Main Organising Committee head and other State and community leaders were also present.

“Unity is an important agenda. There should be no extremism in religion and racism because if there is, unity cannot be achieved. We need moderation, we are created differently but differences should not prevent us from living in peace and harmony with each other and progressing forward,” he said.

He cited China, as an example, which become a developed nation in 40 years.

“Previously China was a poor country and under communism. But now, even what was previously just a small and poor fishing village like Shenzen has become a rich place which contributed to trillions of yuan to the annual Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

“Such a small place like Shenzen, which is smaller than Kota Kinabalu, can contribute greatly to the GDP.

“How did they manage to do that without having any natural resources? Because they have the right mindset, they are united to ensure they have a better life.”

Mohd Shafie said the Tadau Kaamatan celebration, which is participated by various ethnics, need to be preserved as among efforts to continue fostering unity, especially in Sabah.

“This is not only celebrated in Sabah, but throughout the country.

“It also shows how important it is to preserve and pass down the cultural heritage so it will not be forgotten in the people pursue for modernisation,” he said.

He hoped families have also made use of the celebration for strengthening family bonds, apart from continuing with the tradition passed down by their ancestors.

The Chief Minister was also pleased to see the colourful traditional wear by the various communities, saying he encouraged the people to continue such practice not only to promote the ethnic diversity in Sabah but become an industry that can generate income to people in the State.

By: Larry Ralon.

Read more @ http://www.dailyexpress.com.my/news/135978/unity-bedrock-for-progress-cm/

Mass buka puasa at Dataran Merdeka draws the crowd

Sunday, May 26th, 2019
The Iftar@KL programme, held for the fifth consecutive year, has become a major attraction not just for Muslims but also Non-Muslims and foreigners alike. Pic by STR/OWEE AH CHUN

KUALA LUMPUR: It is only during the holy month of Ramadan that you can see city folk and tourists breaking fast together, next to the historical backdrop of Sultan Abdul Samad building, Royal Selangor Club and Dataran Merdeka.

The Iftar@KL programme, held for the fifth consecutive year, has become a major attraction not just for Muslims but also Non-Muslims and foreigners alike.

Sitting side-by-side on a mat, everyone was served with popular ‘buka puasa’ dishes such as ‘bubur lambuk’ (spiced rice porridge), dates and cakes distributed by Tourism, Art and Culture Ministry.

For Mohd Rossi Yusof and his family, Iftar@KL has become somewhat of an annual event.

The 45-year-old father of one said he would make it a point to be at Dataran Merdeka at least once during Ramadan to break fast.

“I will come with my wife, Nor Meme Ahmat, 44 and son Adam Haikal, 15. I will also invite my siblings who are from different parts of Klang Valley to join us. It’s like an annual family gathering for us.

“This year, I am here only with my wife and son as my other siblings are busy. I look forward to this mass breaking of fast event organised by the Ministry,” he said when met here, today.

Rossi, from Puchong, said he started the tradition because he wanted to create something unique for the family.

“Every year, rain or shine I will make sure I will be at Dataran Merdeka.

Pic by STR/OWEE AH CHUN

“This year, the bazaar was relocated to Jalan Raja, which I think is good. People can do their Raya shopping at the bazaar after the mass buka puasa event,” he said.

Noor Shamimi Iskandar, 24, from Ampang said she was excited to be able to break fast in the huge crowd, with the iconic Sultan Abdul Samad building in the background.

Like Rossi, she too has made it into an annual event with her friends from Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM).

“It’s just our way of catching up with one another, especially since some of them are working in the city centre.

“Besides, this is more strategic (in terms of location) and cost effective rather meeting up at a high-end eateries,” she said while waiting for the arrival of her three friends.

Fauzieha Wan Kamaruddin, 38, said this was her first time breaking fast at Dataran Merdeka since she started working in KL more than 10 years.

“I went to the bazaar searching for Raya clothes for my 3-year-old daughter.

“Since I am already here, I thought why not experience the mass buka ouasa event with other people here,” she said.

Meanwhile, Kanae Mizuno, 31, from Japan, said this was her second time taking part in Iftar@KL.

“My friend invited me to join them last year, so I came.

By Kalbana Perimbanayagam and Teoh Pei Ying.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2019/05/491396/mass-buka-puasa-dataran-merdeka-draws-crowd

A blissful Wesak Day celebration

Monday, May 20th, 2019
KUALA LUMPUR: On Wesak Day, Buddhists began to visit temples nationwide early in the morning to carry out religious rituals and pay tribute to Siddharta Gautama, the founder of the religion.

Many also took the opportunity to donate in cash and kind to the underprivileged.

A lively yet modest atmosphere filled the air when some 3,000 devotees visited the Maha Vihara Buddhist Temple in Brickfields yesterday to conduct religious ceremonies by lighting candles and bringing flowers to symbolise the birth, enlightenment and death of Gautama Buddha.

One of the devotees, Tham Swe Loong, 68, said the Wesak Day celebration was not only for religious observation but also to serve as a day to help those in need.

“We are very lucky to celebrate Wesak Day in harmony.

“It shows that we are living in a peaceful multiracial country,” he told Bernama.

Other Buddhist temples here were also packed with devotees carrying flowers as well as other basic necessities such as rice, bottled drinks and canned food to be donated to the deserving.

The celebration also attracted Australian tourist Olivia Brown, 27, who said it was fascinating “to witness such a spiritual ceremony, full of tradition and rituals which shows their (Buddhists) faith and belief”.

There were also volunteers from various welfare bodies and non-governmental organisations at the temples to ensure the celebration went smoothly.

In Selangor, Buddhists converged at the Fo Guan Shan (FGS) Dong Zen Temple in Jenjarom, Banting.

One of them, Lee Mun, 45, said the family wanted the children to learn more about Buddhism so that they can have a stronger grounding to become better individuals.

The temple, which houses the largest Buddha statue in Selangor, is also a tourist attraction as well as an important cultural and educational centre.

In Negri Sembilan, devotees began to converge at the prayer hall inside the Malaysian Buddhist Associa­tion of Negri Sembilan branch building in Jalan Tan Sri Manickvasagam as early as 9am.

Hundreds of devotees performed religious rituals which took place until the afternoon.

In Melaka, the Seck Kia Ench temple in Jalan Gajah Berang was the focus of more than 3,000 devotees.

Melaka Chief Minister Adly Zahari was also present to wish the devotees Happy Wesak Day as he mingled with those at the temple.

The shopping malls in the city were also crowded with people who took advantage of the public holiday today.

Some were there to make early preparations for Hari Raya Aidilfitri.

In Johor Baru, overcast weather did not prevent 40,000 Buddhists from gathering at the Fo Ghuang Shan Hsingma Si Bathing Temple in Skudai since early morning to perform religious rituals.

The ceremony, attended by state executive councillor Liow Cai Tung, also featured a dance performance by Guang Ming Institute of Performing Arts-Cebu from the Philippines.

In Penang, heavy rain did not dampen the spirit of the devotees, including Tang Kwang Seng, 45, a Grab driver, from fulfilling his

religious obligation at the Penang Buddhist Association in Jalan Burma.

“Regardless of the weather condition, we will always come to pray, to fulfil our obligations,” he said.

In Perak, Deputy Health Minister and Gopeng MP Dr Lee Boon Chye joined other devotees in performing religious rituals at the Malaysian Buddhist Centre Perak branch in Pasir Puteh.

He told reporters later that Wesak Day symbolised the harmony and unity that existed in the country’s multiracial, multireligious society.

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2019/05/20/a-blissful-wesak-day-celebration/#Ea9G8OFsUuC2xj4r.99

Equal rights and mutual respect

Friday, April 5th, 2019
Parliament Kuala Lumpur. – FILE PIC

WILL the Bill to amend Article 1(2) of the Federal Constitution, expected to be tabled this coming week, pass in Parliament?

Constitutional amendments require a two-thirds majority in Parliament, something the current Pakatan Harapan (PH) national government does not have.

It either needs the support of the 19 Gabungan Parti Sarawak (GPS) members of parliament or the official parliamentary opposition to carry the amendment.

The proposed amendment came about after an earlier amendment in 1976 which purportedly reduced Sabah and Sarawak to merely two states instead of being two administratively distinct territories which together with Malaya and Singapore, formed the expanded Malaysian federation in 1963 as “equal partners”.

What is closer to the truth may be that the 1976 amendment only regularised the accepted fact

It will be noted that back then, the amendment passed with the support of Sabah and Sarawak MPs who were mostly with the Barisan Nasional administration.

If there had been disquiet among them (the then incumbent MP for Bintulu, Ting Ling Kiew, now says he was one who objected and absented himself when the vote came up), it was muted and barely spilled into public discourse.

So what changed between 1976 and now is that the popular disquiet in the two Borneo states has led to the current national government seeking to restore the constitutional order to status quo.

The best guess will be that Putrajaya today realises the popular disquiet across the South China Sea is quite real, for any number of reasons – some perhaps conflicting or contradictory and therefore perhaps a bit unrealistic

But something must be done, goes this line of thinking, and since there is this clamour to restore the constitution pertaining to the status of Sabah and Sarawak to that prior to 1976, that clamour will be acceded to.

But if, as the Sarawak state administration seems to have belatedly realised, such an exercise brings little practical effect, why clamour for it in the first place?

I think it speaks to a general confusion on the part of some state leaders.

The public is ill-served by a profusion of conflicting demands placed by such leaders and a somewhat haphazard and perhaps premature announcements on new state initiatives with far-reaching implications such as the formation of Petros, the new state-owned oil-and-gas entity, and a sales tax on the same industry.

What seems clear in spite of all the conflicting pronouncements though is a general public sense in both Sabah and Sarawak that the people in both states have not gotten a fair deal out of federation.

It will be a challenge for all concerned to find ways to address such a perception.

Putrajaya, despite the confusion and some duplicity emanating out of Sabah and Sarawak, will be well-advised not to attempt moves that will be interpreted as cynical and thereby stirring perhaps even greater troubles further down the road.

But what exactly can the federal administration do? It needs, above all, to recognise that a general clamour for both these states to fully run their own affairs is a legitimate and reasonable desire.

It therefore has to find meaningful ways to further devolve powers currently exercised by the federal government to both states, where possible and feasible

This will naturally mean that expenditures usually disbursed by federal departments and ministries will now be channelled directly to the Sabah and Sarawak governments instead of via block grants, bearing in mind that a frustration given voice by the late Sarawak Chief Minister Tan Sri Adenan Satem about the state being merely one of 12 other supplicants for federal funds resonates far and wide, even today.

Although it is quite impossible for Putrajaya to accede to demands that development funds be apportioned on the basis that Sabah and Sarawak are two of three “territories” within federation without considering that population-wise, both states together constitute not even a third of the entire national population, creative ways can surely be found to give emphasis for these two states to catch up with developments in the peninsula.

Both states deserve a “new deal” within the federation.

The federal government needs to go on the offensive in educating the people in Sabah and Sarawak about the “hidden” costs borne entirely by Putrajaya in defending the territorial integrity of the two states with their long land and maritime international boundaries – not just in military personnel and hardware terms but through international diplomacy.

By John Teo.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2019/04/476267/equal-rights-and-mutual-respect

Understanding right-wing extremism

Sunday, March 17th, 2019
Women embrace near Masjid Al Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 17, 2019. REUTERS

OF all places on earth, peaceful Christchurch in New Zealand has just become the scene of a cold blooded massacre of innocent people in two mosques there. With 49 dead so far and dozens wounded, it is one of the worst terror attacks in the world, this time carried out by white right-wing extremists. Three male and one female suspects are in custody.

In an immediate reaction, the secretary general of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) Yousef Ahmad Al-Othaimeen, said: “The brutal crime had shocked and hurt the feelings of all Muslims around the world, and served as a further warning on the obvious dangers of hate, intolerance, and Islamophobia.”

Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad called on the governments of the world to understand why such terror attacks took place and their modus operandi, which is different from a conventional warfare.

Many people may not understand what right-wing extremism or the far right is all about and its recent resurgence in the West. In simplistic terms, right-wing politics is about preserving certain often oppressive social orders and hierarchies as inevitable and even desirable. Right-wing people tend to react to progress and change, hence they are also called “reactionaries”.

Extreme right-wing politics is associated with ultra-nationalism, fascism and racism or race supremacy, which is often used as justification to oppress and repress others. The most classic example of right-wing extremism is Nazism (oppressing Jews and others) and more recently, Zionism (oppressing Palestinian people) and the extreme right-wing politics used by President Donald Trump in many instances to secure and stay in power.

The far right has also been sweeping Europe, mostly singling out innocent Muslim refugees there, who are merely escaping from the horrors of wars in Syria and the region. These vulnerable refugees become easy targets for xenophobia, hate and outright racism.

Donald Trump used right-wing politics to get himself elected in 2016 and he is also playing the same right-wing politics to stay in power. Many of the Far Right in the West today are inspired by and see President Trump as their poster child. He has certainly done a lot to instill Islamophobia and hatred against the Muslims by his various actions such as his anti-Muslim statements, very pro-Zionist stance and the ban on Muslims from at least seven countries to visit the USA.

President Trump may have sent his “condolences and warmest sympathy” to the people of New Zealand on the terror incident. But he is seen by many to be culpable or at least partially responsible for creating an atmosphere of hatred and racism against

Muslims and promoting xenophobia with his Border Wall idea with Mexico.

The purpose of Trump’s Islamophobia or racism is to distract, confuse and divide & rule in order to stave off serious challenges to his presidency including allegations on his abuse of power, obstruction to justice and on the possible outcome of Russia investigation which may include impeachment.

I have written many press articles on why we should not take peace for granted, the importance of mutual-racial respect and the need to recognise the cultural diversity of Asia, with Malaysia as a mini-Asia, as a strength for our survival and progress and never as a weakness or liability. We must never allow our cultural diversity to be exploited by extremists of any shades to create conflict, wars and terror like what has happened in New Zealand.

Most people take peace for granted. We were shaken and shocked when our own MH17 was cruelly shot down in 2014 in a war fought more than 8,000 kilometres away.

There have also been numerous terror attacks in our neighbouring countries recently. Recent police arrests of suspected terrorists in Malaysia should send alarm bells ringing to the authorities concerned. We must never sit back and assume our multi-racial country is immune from such acts of terror.

There is hardly any populated place on earth that is safe from the extremists of all

shades who are motivated to be mass-murderers based on their extreme right-wing political or religious ideologies which would include the misinterpretations of religious teachings.

More needs to be done to analyse and understand the real causes of extremism and to promote sustainable peace and multi-cultural understanding.

By K.K.Tan .

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2019/03/470152/understanding-right-wing-extremism

Fostering togetherness in celebration

Monday, February 18th, 2019
The school organises its annual gathering so pupils can learn from each other.

The school organises its annual gathering so pupils can learn from each other.

EVERY year, SJK (C) Tun Tan Cheng Lock organises its Chinese New Year celebrations ahead of the week-long festive break.

The celebration is held to raise awareness on Chinese culture among pupils from different races. It helps them to learn from each other.

The school’s board of directors chairman Datuk Lee Hwa Beng and Parent-Teacher Association chairman Eason Phan Yoke Seng invited Selangor deputy education department director Muhamad Radzi Abdullah, Petaling Perdana education officer Abdul Ghaffar Bakar and previous principals from Sekolah Wawasan to celebrate Chinese New Year together.

The atmosphere in the school grounds was electric as the “lion” leapt high into the air. There was also calligraphy writing to kick off the celebration at the school.

image: https://video.unrulymedia.com/native/images/in-art-close-icon-128×128-16481b937f87b244a645cdbef0d930f8.png

At the same event, school principla Ngann Sook Wei also paid tribute to the students who received awards during the Sixth Hong Kong International Students’ Innovation Competition that was held in Hong Kong last December led by vice princial Ong Chun Hor.

The award recipients are Christine Ng Ruixi from 6K, Elyse Wong Zhye Lin from 6H and Zoey Wong Zhye Xuan from 4M.

Their masterpiece, “Tornado Dust-Buster” won five awards including second place, International Innovation Award, Special Award in Korea, Indonesia and Hong Kong.

Muhamad Radzi praised the students for their achievements.

Teachers and pupils received angpow and tangerines from the school.

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2019/02/17/fostering-togetherness-in-celebration/#P9t0OOZukg5EZYY6.99

New emojis are coming

Sunday, February 10th, 2019
The new emojis emphasise inclusivity.

INTERRACIAL couples. A guide dog for blind people. A person using a wheelchair. These were among the new emojis announced last week by Unicode Consortium, the non-profit that provides standards for text on the Internet and oversees emojis.

The list — which includes 59 new emojis, as well as variants for a total of 230 options — emphasises inclusivity. People will soon be able to create a “holding hands” emoji to reflect their own relationship, selecting for the skin colour and gender identity of each individual. Other options include emojis showing a hearing aid, prosthetic limbs, sign language, a cane or a wheelchair.

A host of other new symbols include an otter, a sloth, a waffle, falafel, a yawning face, a white heart, a sari and a contentious one-piece bathing suit.

In a world where people use emojis to represent everything from weddings to poop, the announcement naturally led to much discussion, with an image of a drop of blood becoming a new way to talk about menstruation and a pinching symbol leading to jokes about a certain
male body part being very, very small

But don’t expect to see the latest offering on your keyboard just yet. That will most likely happen later this year.

The Unicode Consortium sets the standards for emoji compatibility, allowing the symbols to translate across the Internet. Then companies like Apple and Google have to design emojis and incorporate the code into their operating systems, Greg Welch, a board member for Unicode, said. New emojis typically come to cellphones in September or October, Unicode said in the announcement.

Last Wednesday, a representative for Apple pointed to its proposal for Unicode to create accessibility emojis, which said that the new emojis would “foster a diverse culture that is inclusive of disability” and help people express themselves, as well as show support for loved ones.

A representative for Google said that it hoped to release the new emoji designs soon.

The latest update continues a trend toward greater emoji diversity, which began in earnest a few years ago when a range of skin tones was introduced. In 2017, a hijab emoji was introduced.

“You see people are asking for curly hair or skin tone and bald and hijab,” said Jennifer Lee, who serves on Unicode’s emoji subcommittee and helped found Emojination, a grassroots effort to make emojis more inclusive.

Tinder, the online dating app, had campaigned for Unicode to better represent couples of different races and genders in the “universal language of the digital age”.

“Love is universal,” Tinder said on its website. “And it’s time for interracial couples to be represented in our universal language.”

“It’s huge and historic,” said Ken Tanabe, the founder of Loving Day, an organisation that encourages people to celebrate the anniversary of the Supreme Court decision that legalised interracial marriage.

“You are talking about marriages and starting families,” he said, adding that he had heard from people who could not find a wedding cake topper that reflected their relationship and chose to use black and white chess pieces instead.

“Having an emoji that’s already there, it feels like, hey, we are part of the conversation,” he said. “We are part of the community. We are represented in the most personal part of our lives.”

Apple had advocated adding emojis to represent people with disabilities. In a statement, Howard A. Rosenblum, the chief executive of the National Association of the Deaf, a civil rights organisation for the deaf and hard of hearing people, said it worked with Apple to help create the deaf emoji and hoped it would help “raise awareness throughout the world about deaf culture and the many sign languages that exist”.

One of the new emojis — a guide dog for people who are blind and visually impaired — offers a fun way for people to represent their identity and honour their dogs in texts and emails, said Becky Davidson, who works at Guiding Eyes for the Blind, an organisation that provides trained dogs for people who are blind or visually impaired.

By Sarah Mervosh.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2019/02/458761/new-emojis-are-coming

Celebrating lunar new year and the diversity of the world’s calendars

Thursday, February 7th, 2019
The Gregorian calendar has only been used as a global standard for about a century, and is ‘very much a reflection of European commerce and colonialism’. It has now been built into computer architecture, but that doesn’t mean another calendar couldn’t one day become dominant. FILE PIC

THE Lunar New Year kicked off on Tuesday as one of the most important holidays in Vietnam, South Korea, China and other Asian countries. Typically, it starts on the second new moon after winter solstice.

On the Gregorian calendar, the civil calendar used in most countries, including the United States, the Lunar New Year changes every year, as do the dates of holidays like Rosh Hashana, Deepavali and Ramadan.

It can be easy to think of a calendar as a scientific given, or a reflection of the laws of the universe. In fact, as these holidays remind us, there are as many ways to track time as there are cultures and languages. Each calendar reveals something about how the people who created it relate to the world around them while also preserving rich cultural identities and memories.

Most timekeeping traditions track the movement of the sun, moon and stars. Others consider seasonal events, like the autumnal swarming of sea worms, used to orient each year in the Trobriand Islands off New Guinea, or the flowering of immortelle trees into hundreds of tiny vermilion flames, which marks the start of the dry season in Trinidad.

With any calendar, the basic question is which of thousands, if not millions, of cycles in the world to follow, says Kevin Birth, an anthropology professor at Queens College. Calendars “always come down to this cultural choice”, he says, so using one system over another is ultimately a social contract, regardless of how scientifically accurate or sophisticated a calendar is.

A solar year — the time it takes Earth to orbit the sun — lasts around 365 days, while a lunar year, or 12 full cycles of the moon, is roughly 354 days. Because of this discrepancy, a purely lunar calendar — like the Islamic, or Hijri, calendar — doesn’t stay aligned with the seasons. Islam’s holy month of Ramadan may fall in summer one year, and winter a number of years later.

To correct for seasonal drift, the Chinese, Hindu, Jewish and many other calendars are lunisolar. In these calendars, a month is still defined by the moon, but an extra month is added periodically to stay close to the solar year.

A solar calendar is useful for farming, fishing and foraging societies that need to plan ahead for particular times of the year. But a purely solar calendar, like the Gregorian, tells you nothing about the phases of the moon.

The traditional Hijri calendar requires an observation of the early crescent moon to start a new month, and thus encourages paying attention to the cosmos. The Gregorian calendar can’t be tracked in the sky, which might be why many Westerners have less awareness of the moon and other natural phenomena.

Holidays also structure personal and historical narratives. Some secular holidays in the United States centre on legacies of war, which fits “when you think that the United States also has the largest military budget in the world”, Birth says.

Chinese holidays usually emphasise family union and honouring ancestors, Yuan said, which aligns with the importance of filial piety.

Many ancient calendars, like the Chinese and Mesoamerican ones, build in fortunetelling, with prescriptions for when to build a house, get married, have a funeral and other life events. Similar calendars provide structure and comfort to people today.

Britt Hart, an astrologer based in Philadelphia, says she thinks people can be drawn to horoscope-based calendars because they’re seeking a grander sense of time and order in the universe.

In the context of history, staying connected to an alternative calendar can also be a form of resisting the mainstream, or maintaining an identity outside of it. When a calendar is imposed on a society, it usually has to do with politics and power. The ability “to say when the year will start, or decide that a religious festival should be celebrated at a particular time, can be quite useful for a politician,” Stern said.

The Gregorian calendar has only been used as a global standard for about a century, and is “very much a reflection of European commerce and colonialism,” Birth said. It has now been built into computer architecture, but that doesn’t mean another calendar couldn’t one day become dominant.

By STEPH YIN.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2019/02/457894/celebrating-lunar-new-year-and-diversity-worlds-calendars