Archive for April, 2017

Understand why schoolchildren join gangs, says analyst

Saturday, April 29th, 2017

(file pix) A screenshot from a viral video showing gang members, including secondary school students causing a commotion in front of a school in Klang. Pix courtesy of NST reader.

KUALA LUMPUR: Understanding why schoolchildren join triads is vital before any action is taken against them.

Crime analyst Kamal Affandi Hashim said students join such groups for the attention, recognition and presumed protection.

“Secret societies don’t advertise themselves publicly on the billboards. Yet, they are able to attract followers just like businesses, with their own marketers, agents, and recruiters.

“They do an aggressive campaign, targeting those of a certain age to join them. If we understand how they work, then we will be able to nab these ‘gatekeepers’ behind the recruitment,” he said.

Other than punishing the students, authorities, as well as teachers and parents, must have a two-way communication with them, said Kamal.

“We better begin to communicate with these students. This includes understanding their need and showing that we want to help.

“For instance, if these students don’t like to study, we must acknowledge this. Send them to vocational schools or music schools, if that’s what they like.

“The problem is when adults force the children to follow their demands. They are not listening to the need of the children.”

National Union of the Teaching Profession president Kamarolzaman Abd Razak suggested the Education Ministry set up a special programme similar to that of the National Service for students involved with gangs.

Kamarolzaman said the activities in the programme would include social service and a visit to a prison.

“Many of these children only hang out among themselves. We must send them to attend such programmes so they can mix with society. When they join the social service through such programmes, they will know how it feels to contribute to society. The programmes should include activities with enforcement agencies, too.

by FAISAL ASYRAF.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/news/exclusive/2017/04/234824/understand-why-schoolchildren-join-gangs-says-analyst

Sabah’s major economic sectors urged to implement OSH practices

Saturday, April 29th, 2017

TAWAU: Three major economic sectors in Sabah –tourism, agriculture and logging – need to implement good occupational safety and health practices to reduce the number of accidents at the workplace.

Minister of Human Resources, Dato Sri Richard Riot Anak Jaem said the level of participation of employers and workers was still low in training programmes provided by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

According to him, the tourism industry in Sabah valued at RM7.25 billion would be affected if no measures are taken by the authorities and tour operators to ensure the safety of employees and tourists.

Likewise, he said if the number of accidents and fatalities among workers in the agriculture and logging sectors keep increasing, the country’s image as an exporter of agricultural products and timber would be tarnished.

“According to the latest statistics issued by the Social Security Organisation (SOCSO), total number of accidents from 2011 to 2016 was 8,405 in the agricultural sector and 1,899 in the forestry sector across the country.

“The breakdown of the statistics report shows that just in Sabah in 2016, there were 182 accidents reported for both sectors,” he said.

He said this when declaring open the NIOSH Office in Tawau at Jalan Damai yesterday which was attended by Minister of Youth and Sports, Datuk Tawfiq Abu Bakar Titingan and NIOSH chairman, Tan Sri Lee Lam Thye. The minister also reminded all construction companies to appoint a site safety supervisor to ensure the safety of workers at the construction sites.

SOCSO has recorded 721 fatalities and 49,430 disabilities nationwide with a total sum of RM2.948 billion paid out as compensation to the next-of-kin.

As such, he believes the new NIOSH office in Tawau will help to boost awareness in occupational safety and health in Sabah.

by NAZRINI BADARUN.

Read more @ http://www.newsabahtimes.com.my/nstweb/fullstory/15374

Lesson schools need to learn

Friday, April 28th, 2017

Gangsterism in school: Students celebrating a Gang 24 special day outside a school in Klang.

Gangsterism in school: Students celebrating a Gang 24 special day outside a school in Klang.

The recent rampage outside schools has again highlighted a major problem with schools – the weaknesses in a system that overlooks poor performing students, making them easy targets for gangs.

THEY could have been scenes from the Wild Wild West. It was in Klang, the western gateway into the country but instead of cowboys, horses and guns, there were schoolboys, kapcais and firecrackers.

Anyone who saw the videos of the gang that wreaked havoc outside schools in the Selangor royal town would have been horrified.

These were schoolboys, sent there to study. But the teachers had no answers for the kind of trouble these youths created as they celebrated their “special day”. And then there was that kid, treating a string of firecrackers like a cowboy’s lasso.

Privately, I hoped he would get burnt.

The thing is: it is not an isolated event. Schools throughout the country are being infiltrated by gangs, whatever the number they go by.

Just a few years ago, there were horror stories coming out of a school in Rawang.

The boys there were aged just between 14 and 16, and already they were hardcore gangsters and – worse – rapists and molesters.

It was only after the story of a 14-year-old rape victim broke that the authorities finally cracked the whip. The girl had been raped multiple times – within the school premises!

What were the teachers doing? Were they truly ignorant of what was happening? Or were they afraid of the “outside people” who were behind the schoolboys? It’s likely that they were afraid of these backers. And so were the schoolmates and residents nearby.

Even in the Klang case, there is word that the gang is backed by a relative of a well-connected politician. We don’t know if it is true, but there is a WhatsApp message going around to that effect. It is for the cops to investigate.

The cops say WhatsApp is one of their biggest banes too. The gang members communicate using the app and, already, WhatsApp groups called “Gang 24” and “Apache” have been found.

Again, it is likely that the teachers knew what was going on and were afraid to act, because of the outside influence.

It’s not just in Klang or Rawang. Right in the nation’s capital of Kuala Lumpur and its satellite city of Petaling Jaya, students are signing up to join gangs for just RM30.

According to child rights activist James Nayagam, some students have no choice in the matter. It is either join them or get beaten up by them.

The former Suhakam commissioner agrees that the teachers are afraid of these gangs.

“Moving the student to a different school won’t help as often there will be members from the same gang waiting in the other schools for him,” he told a news portal.

According to him, there is a lot to be done for our education system. Very often, teachers have their eyes on their own KPIs.

The more high-scoring students they produce, the better they look in the eyes of the administrators.

The timid and low-performing students are overlooked and teachers don’t pay attention to them. The low-performers all get thrown into one class and are left to fend for themselves.

They are easy targets for the gangs.

“They will look for lonely, timid students from some of the lower-performing classes and offer them protection,” says Nayagam.

by DORAIRAJ NADASON
Read more @ http://www.thestar.com.my/opinion/columnists/why-not/2017/04/28/lesson-schools-need-to-learn-the-recent-rampage-outside-schools-has-again-highlighted-a-major-proble/#3MaAxEUzyBd84ZbL.99

Learn to be passionately purposeful at work

Friday, April 28th, 2017
(File pix) Datuk J Jegathesan. Pix by Saddam Yusoff

“EMPLOYEE engagement” is the buzzword in all organisations I consult with. There’s nothing that gets the human resources department swooning more than finding that somewhat elusive engaged employee.

Managers too, often fall back on the rather avuncular term “engaged”, when they describe how they want their employees to be.

Yet, I find that most employees I coach have no idea of what it means to be engaged.

I can, of course, tell you the traits of a dis-engaged employee.

These type of employees complain a lot; they are experts at making excuses; rarely help their colleagues; get easily distracted; and are lackadaisical.

How do you get engaged at work? I believe this comes when you combine a purposeful existence with an unwavering enthusiasm to achieve that objective.

Your sense of purpose is shaped by the things you believe in, and value. And once you get connected to purpose, you will be enthused about your work.

I would like to focus on how you can develop enthusiasm for work, which will, in turn, make you an engaged employee.

In a nutshell, you only get enthusiastic when you have a vibrant interest in something. I also know from working with successful leaders that you need an extraordinary sense of eagerness to achieve anything of great value.

Let me share how you can build enthusiasm in your life, especially for work.

To start with, you need to be passionate. When you refer to someone as being passionate, you are in fact saying that they have great strength and energy.

Only if you have passion, will you achieve success because it fuels your enthusiasm, even when you hit the sticky patches in life. So, learn to love your job and don’t ever tire of going the extra mile to achieve results.

Next, you have to be positive. And no, I am not talking about being mindlessly optimistic.

Being positive is as much an active endeavour, as it is a state of mind. So, train your mind to recognise that even when things look dire, you can find learning lessons and silver linings.

The third criterion for enthusiasm is that you need to be proactive.

The opposite of being proactive is being reactive. Proactive people train themselves to take full responsibility for their life. Reactive people often get affected by their physical environment. So, become proactive as you will be an initiator of things.

It becomes vital that you cultivate these three attributes to become enthusiastic.

One of my earliest mentors was a man called J. Jegathesan. He is a living example of someone who embodies these three characteristics.

I have known him since I was a kid. He was the leader of a service-oriented spiritual organisation, and my family was close to him.

I used to be thrilled when I found out that Uncle Jega was coming to Penang. He was just mesmerising. He would stand in front of hundreds of people and speak for an hour or two, and have everyone eating out of the palm of his hands. His charisma was spectacular.

But it wasn’t just the external packaging that was remarkable.

He had the ability to inspire and engage everyone he came into contact with.

As I grew older, I had the chance to work with him, and not just be an audience member.

In these instances, I saw the three attributes I identified above come into play.

He was truly passionate about what he was into. He expends near fanatical energy while working on uniting people of different faiths through service projects. And, his passion and enthusiasm was contagious, every time.

His positivism would also ignite others to be engaged. He would regularly come up with seemingly grandiose ideas that looked impossible to pull off. Often, they were nation-building activities that should have been undertaken

by the government.

But, he managed to inspire a relatively small non-governmental organisation, manned only by unpaid volunteers, to successfully complete these gargantuan projects. I am certain that these projects were only successful because he was able to infuse his optimistic attitude into each team member.

As we undertook these big events and activities, it was apparent that while most grappled with the complexities of the task at hand, he would always be looking for the best solutions and conjuring up alternative strategies.

by SHANKAR R. SANTHIRAM.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2017/04/234516/learn-be-passionately-purposeful-work

Traditional wisdom in environmental protection

Friday, April 28th, 2017

File pix) A study on traditional grazing practices in the Tibetan alpine meadows concluded that the light and moderate grazing resulted in sustainable yield to biodiversity.

IT is known that every society teaches wisdom to its next generation. Wisdom makes life easier as it contains experiences, knowledge, and guides people to distinguish the truth from falsehood. The virtue of wisdom lies in one’s ability to use reason, to act wisely for himself and for his surroundings. Or, perhaps, to judge correctly at the point of decision with regard to the application of experience and knowledge.

In environmental wisdom, it manifests in modest practice, revealing the many ways humans and their environment interact.

For example, the Turkana people feed their goats on trees, which were controlled by elders. The latter then decides who should be allowed to use them and for how long. This community control system allows the elders to regulate people’s behaviour towards their environment. In ancient China, the concept of harmony (he) and balance (bing) with nature isadesired practice. This includes anything, from not pulling crops up by force to keeping the water channel clean.

A study on traditional grazing practices in the Tibetan alpine meadows, which was published by the Journal of Agriculture Ecosystem and Environment last year, concluded that the light and moderate grazing resulted in sustainable yield to biodiversity.

In Islam, we learn environmental wisdom through the leadership of Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him). As an example of modesty, the Prophet encouraged us to eat few bites to satisfy our hunger, and if there is a need for more, it should be one third for our food, one third for our liquid and one third for our breath.

These characteristics in different societies, taken in totality and individually, have enabled people to live in harmony with nature. In turn, the combination of leadership and ethical practices has provided stability to the community.

Eventually, those good characteristics have also merged to form philosophical bases, strategies, and systems to maintain the environment. In contrast, the power of wisdom is something that has been oblivious to so-called modern people.

The reason of for such ignorance is because traditional knowledge and its culture are seen by today’s generation as backward.

Ironically, the limitation of that view does not possess enough justification for us to understand the complex interaction between societies, their cultures and their environment.

What is of most concern, is that it has focused too much on the ways in which human societies have transformed their environment, but very little on how cultural elements help maintain the environment of the communities. Although many studies have attested to “the old ways” of solving environmental challenges, or perhaps, already appreciated the incorporation of religious teachings in natural resource management, the bias towards traditional wisdom is a hard nut to crack.

How do we get to the bottom of this problem?

The good news is there are learning benefits in environmental wisdom that can be brought into our environmental education programmes. Environmental sustainability is more likely to be relevant when the modern and developed world domesticates local wisdom, local knowledge, local experiences and religious teachings. To achieve this ambitious vision is to teach students the core environmental values of any society and to nurture them with leadership skills so they can work out environmental projects with the local way of doing things.

The narrower the gap between environmental wisdom and environmental education, the more effective the environmental and social outcomes would be. Therefore, the gist of environmental education programmes is to muster transformative knowledge to drive social change, to reinvent social systems through traditional ecological religious wisdom and knowledge.

The greatest challenge is not only to innovate technologies for today’s environmental problems, but to inculcate the richness of wise ideas into today’s minds.

When a man is trapped under a guise of an attitude that gives him the freedom to take as much living resources as possible, he has neglected morality, truism, justice and equality. Wisdom needs to be incorporated in environmental education, impart positive values, and ideas that teaches man to preserve nature.

To be wise, we have to cling on to the following wisdom: that humans are part and parcel of the universe, not above creation. He must live in harmony with the environment, not with arrogance towards it. He has to view the sky as his shade, the earth as his mat, the stars and moon as his light.

by Dr Adha Shaleh.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2017/04/234507/traditional-wisdom-environmental-protection

How maths can solve problems

Friday, April 28th, 2017
(File pix) Khadijah Aqilah Sallehuddin (third from left) enjoying her leisure time with colleagues
By Zulita Mustafa - April 26, 2017 @ 3:26pm

THE application of mathematics in the sciences, technology and engineering has become effective and powerful as the central concept of mathematical modelling.

This new discipline called Industrial Mathematics is also referred to as Applied Mathematics or Mathematical Modelling.

According to UTM Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (UTM-CIAM) director Professor Dr Zainal Abdul Aziz, it is called Maths in Industry in the United Kingdom, while in Japan, it is known as Maths for Industry. Here, it is agreed upon as Industrial Mathematics.

“All these are equivalent to one another, they only differ in name. Industrial mathematics is applicable for the industrial-related application for all kinds of problems relating to car suspension system or groundwater modelling, for example.”

Employment opportunities include data analyst, QC engineer, researchers, maths modeller, and data modeller. Employment areas include the public sector, financial industry,

automotive, manufacturing and industrial companies.

Malaysian Mathematics in Industry Study Group (MMISG) is a network of applied mathematicians,

operational researchers, statisticians and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) researchers across the country centred at the Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM).

This group has more than fifteen active collaborations with industry such as automotive, oil & gas, palm oil plantation, environmental management, as well as engineering and the sciences.

MMISG has been in operation for more than three years.

Zainal said the main focus of MMISG is to ensure that there is a good supply of individuals with mathematical skill sets as they are key to the development of industrial mathematics and also as innovation enabler for industry.

“There is a lack of understanding of this fact in both industry and academia, and it is extremely important for society that this gap is closed.

“An additional contribution to the gap between academia and industry is the lack of the importance of industrial mathematics in industry, which mainly occurred in the 1990s,” said Zainal.

A Career in Mathematics:

For Khadijah Aqilah Sallehuddin, 25, her decision to study Mathematics was the best choice she had ever made.

Currently working as a Data Analyst at Kozo Keikaku Engineering, an engineering consultant company, in Tokyo, Japan, Khadijah obtained her degree in BSc in Mathematics from UTM.

“When we talk about maths, it is not only about subtraction and division, but more to solving real world problems.

“What is unique about industrial maths that gets me so attached is the subject itself which is so peculiar but makes me understand things that can’t be defined by words.

“It is not only in the field of engineering and science, but it is also inside every picture, wave, or even music notes.

“Without even realising it, maths is part of our daily life, from the reasoning it can provide for the best time to wake up, to the amount of rice intake to make us full.

“And that makes me realise this is my path and I want to learn how I can apply maths in the real world,” explained Khadijah.

After getting her Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia results, her father had asked her to apply for a degree in medicine.

She got accepted for a BSc in Mathematics (UTM) and a medical foundation at International Islamic University Malaysia.

by Zulita Mustafa.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/education/2017/04/234030/how-maths-can-solve-problems

National schooling; how can our children ‘grow up’ together?

Friday, April 28th, 2017
Democracy in education does not serve national unity well. But yet, given the agenda, a stronger, more attractive national school system could do so.

OVER the past few years, I have come to the conclusion that despite our pronouncements, we are actually not really serious about this national unity business.

I came to conclude this, perhaps rather harshly, because we are not doing the most fundamental thing needed for the cause, which is getting our children to grow up together.

School is the obvious choice to get our young together. For the good part of over a decade, our children will spend their lives in the company of others in their age group. There, they make friends for life, and their values get formed and world views are shaped.

This is especially important for us in Malaysia, where racial identities are strong and championed in the social, economic and political spheres. Presumably, nothing else would further the cause of national unity than knowing our fellow citizens well.

We had it then, especially in urban centres, when schools were patronised by students of all backgrounds.

But we have less and less of that going on these days. We also used to have national sports teams to get behind, but that is a story for another day.

Perhaps, we now have tens of thousands of children, who know little of their fellow citizens’ race or faith than the generations before them. And if they did, perhaps it is via the worse depictions on social media.

These are obviously factors against nation-building, and yet, politicians and community leaders among us continue to champion a narrow agenda, which will only separate our future generations further and further away.

Some in national schools want them to be more Islamic, for instance, hence, driving others away. Some argue for their mother tongue, hence the drive for vernacular schools; or English, hence the rise of international and private schools.

Everyone is in pursuit of his own end, and is seemingly only paying lip service to the national agenda.

In an ideal world, there would be a single school system only where all children — from heirs to thrones, sons of politicians and captains of industries, all the way to the rest of us — would go to learn and grow up together.

If we were to go the extreme, and if the national agenda were to reign over all else, non-national schools would be “nationalised” and endless resources would be poured into them. There would be no international, religious, vernacular, or private schools. Just to be sure no one would try to circumvent the system, home-schooling would be illegal.

The end, which is national unity, justifies the means. The pain and anguish we feel by this will be rewarded in future.

Alas, a dictating megalomaniac policy is not the solution.

Pluralism in education is something we have subscribed to, and it shall be our guiding principle. There is no turning back to that.

We are not discussing the merit or demerit of various types of schools, for that would be another worthless pursuit.

My thesis here is that democracy in education does not serve national unity well. But yet, given the agenda, a stronger, more attractive national school system could do so.

Thus, it was with great joy and relief that I greet the statements by the deputy prime minister, as well as the education minister, on how the issue of unity could be addressed and furthered by a national education that is far-reaching in its resolve.

But, how do we go about doing so?

The desire for good education transcends all races and strata of economics. I have met many people contemplating sending their children to private or international schools when they could scarcely meet the long-term financial commitment needed.

Vernacular schools, especially Chinese schools, are prospering because of their perceived greater emphasis on the academic. Surely, these are not good for the country?

Yet, getting parents to embrace the bigger agenda of national unity is a big task, when almost all of them care about is how to get the best for their charges.

Is it English proficiency, enrichment programmes, Mathematics, the Sciences, coding, mother tongue, the arts, sports, community service, foreign language? Or all of them?

People must be won over. At the end of the day, despite all our parochial instincts, most parents are practical people. They must see that national schools are able to meet their needs, and more, to be considered for enrolment of their children.

by ZAINUL ARIFIN.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2017/04/234226/national-schooling-how-can-our-children-grow-together

Work, Matters!: Learning to be engaged at work

Friday, April 28th, 2017

If you want to become engaged at work, first develop enthusiasm for your work

“Employee-engagement” is the buzzword in all organizations I consult with. There’s nothing that gets an HR department swooning more than finding that, somewhat, illusive engaged employee.

Managers too, often fall back on the rather avuncular term “engaged”, when they describe how they want their employees to be.

Yet, I find that most employees I coach, have no idea of what it means to be engaged.

I can, of course, tell you the traits of a dis-engaged employee. These type of employees complain a lot; they are experts at making excuses; they rarely help their colleagues; they get easily distracted; and they are lackadaisical.

How do you get engaged at work? I believe this comes when you combine a purposeful existence with an unwavering enthusiasm to achieve that objective.

Your sense of purpose is shaped by the things you believe in, and value. And once you get connected to purpose, you will be enthused about your work.

I would like to focus on how you can develop enthusiasm for work, which will, in turn, make you an engaged employee.

In a nutshell, you only get enthusiastic when you have a vibrant interest in something.

I also know from working with successful leaders and entrepreneurs that you need an extraordinary sense of eagerness to achieve anything of great value.

Let me share how you can build enthusiasm in your life, especially for work.

To start with, you need to be passionate. When you refer to someone as being passionate, you are in fact saying that they have great strength and energy. Only if you have passion, will you achieve success because it fuels your enthusiasm, even when you hit the sticky patches in life. So, learn to love your job and don’t ever tire of going the extra mile to achieve results.

Next, you have to be positive. And no, I am not talking about being mindlessly optimistic. Being positive is as much an active endeavor, as it is a state of mind. So, train your mind to recognise that even when things look dire, you can find learning lessons and silver linings.

The third criterion for enthusiasm is that you need to be proactive. The opposite of being proactive, is being reactive. Proactive people train themselves to take full responsibility for their life. Reactive people often get affected by their physical environment. So, become proactive as you will be an initiator of things.

It becomes vital that you cultivate these three attributes to become enthusiastic.

One of my earliest mentors was a man called J. Jegathesan. He is a living example of someone who embodies these three characteristics. I have known him since I was a kid. He was the leader of a service oriented spiritual organization, and my family was close to him.

I used to be thrilled when I found out that uncle Jega was coming to Penang. This dude was just mesmerizing. He’d stand in front of hundreds of people and speak for an hour or two, and have everyone eating out of the palm of his hands. His charisma was overwhelmingly spectacular.

But it wasn’t just the external packaging that was remarkable. He had an uncanny ability to inspire and engage everyone he came into contact with.

As I grew older, I had occasion to work with him, and not just be an awestruck audience member.

In these instances, I saw the three attributes I identified above, come into action.

He was truly passionate about what he was into. He expends near fanatical energy while working on uniting people of different faiths through service projects. And, his passion and enthusiasm was contagious, every time.

His positivism would also ignite others to be engaged. He would regularly come up seemingly grandiose ideas that looked impossible to pull off. Often, they were nation-building activities that should have been undertaken by the government. But, he managed to inspire a relatively small NGO, manned only by unpaid volunteers, to successfully complete these gargantuan projects. I am certain that these projects were only successful because he was able to infuse his optimistic attitude into every team member.

As we undertook these big events and activities, it was apparent that while most of us grappled with the complexities of the task at hand, he would always be looking for the best solutions and conjuring up alternative strategies. And when things went wrong, as they sometimes do, he would always proactively work at solving whatever missteps that had occurred.

by SHANKAR R. SANTHIRAM.

Read more @ http://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2017/04/234448/work-matters-learning-be-engaged-work

Australia honours contributions, sacrifices of Sabahans

Friday, April 28th, 2017

270417_p3_b

Pairin (front row centre), Smith (front row fifth left), Yeo (front row fourth right) and others in front of the War Memorial

KOTA KINABALU: Australia remembers and honours the contributions and sacrifices made by Sabahans who helped the Australian prisoners of war in World War 2.

Australian High Commissioner to Malaysia, Rod Smith said that apart from remembering and honouring the service and sacrifice of the country’s soldiers in Sabah on ANZAC Day every year, Australia also acknowledges the support from Sabahans who risked their lives to help the solders.

“Every year on ANZAC Day and again on Sandakan Day which is August 15, we hold a memorial service in Sandakan Memorial Park to commemorate the service and sacrifice of not just the Australian and British soldiers but also the locals,” he said when met at the Laying of Wreath ceremony in conjunction with ANZAC Day celebration at the War Memorial here on Wednesday.

According to Smith, Australia and Sabah have a very strong connection as many Australian soldiers had served in Sabah during the World War 2 (WW2), and many lost their lives.

“It is good that we are able to recognise that out of the sacrifice and hardships that were endured by those soldiers in the WW2, grew a very, very strong friendship between Australia and Sabah,” he added.

Meanwhile Sabah Deputy Chief Minister Tan Sri Joseph Pairin Kitingan, who represented Chief Minister Datuk Seri Musa Haji Aman at the event, said that it is important to commemorate the sacrifice made by those soldiers on ANZAC Day.

“We are here to honour the fighters who had lost their lives fighting for our freedom in the first and Second World War, and they include soldiers from Australia and New Zealand.

“We must remember this day (ANZAC Day) because while we are enjoying our freedom and peace now, sometimes we forget that it was not easily earned, and without those brave people, we would not have this peace and prosperity.

by ERIC BAGANG.

Read more @ http://www.newsabahtimes.com.my/nstweb/fullstory/15302

City Hall to ensure KK becomes highly competitive

Friday, April 28th, 2017

270417_p3_e

Yeo (left) receives a memento from Albert as Edward (centre) looks on

KOTA KINABALU: DBKK will ensure that this city will be one of the most competitive in the country. As such, Kota Kinabalu City Hall (DBKK) Mayor Datuk Yeo Boon Hai wants the proposed Kota Kinabalu Competitiveness Master Plan to consider aspects such as economy, education and culture.

The master plan should not just focus on building structures and infrastructure development, the mayor said. He said the master plan for Kota Kinabalu is unique because it covers all aspects to ensure this city becomes more competitive.

The federal government has allocated DBKK RM3 million to implement research for the master plan which is expected to be completed in eight months.

“I want to express my gratitude to the federal government for its financial support towards research works to prepare the master plan,” he said at the master plan workshop here on Wednesday.

As one of Malaysia’s major cities, Kota Kinabalu is chosen under the 11th Malaysia Plan as a catalyst to spur economic growth.

Besides Kota Kinabalu, the competitive master plan also includes Kuala Lumpur, Kuching and Johor Baharu. The plan is based on six principles which among others include increasing economic density, widening transit-based developments and strengthening knowledge-based cluster developments.

Yeo said research for the master plan was implemented with the collaboration of various parties, both local and international consultants.

These consultants have wide knowledge in implementing research work for similar master plans in other locations, he said.

by MARRYAN RAZAN.

Read more @ http://www.newsabahtimes.com.my/nstweb/fullstory/15303