Archive for April, 2019

Maszlee not just about black shoes

Tuesday, April 16th, 2019
Several articles appeared in a news portal, some recycled material while others referred to his controversial “black shoes” ruling for schoolchildren . – FILE PIC

EDUCATION Minister Dr Maszlee Malik has been criticised, again. Several articles appeared in a news portal, some recycled material while others referred to his controversial “black shoes” ruling for schoolchildren .

This letter will explain what Maszlee has done since he was appointed to the post.

His ministry is one of the largest with about 10,000 schools, half a million teachers and half a million students — this does not include the universities.

Among others, he has abolished examinations for Years One to Three; proposed a curriculum revamp (this is expected to be implemented in 2021); reduced teachers’ non-teaching tasks such as paperwork and clerical duties; restored autonomy and academic freedom by tabling amendments to the Universities and University Colleges Act 1971; and introduced a new policy to address the issue of stateless children to enable them to attend national schools.

Under Maszlee’s tenure, the ministry has restored residential schools (s ekolah berasrama penuh) for the benefit of poor students.

This policy enables more students from the Bottom 40 per cent income families to study in residential schools.

Of the 9,350 students who enrolled this year, more than 52 per cent are from B40 families, a significant increase compared with the previous years.

By doing away with exams for Years One to Three, Maszlee has allowed for a more holistic development of pupils.

International education systems like the Finnish model have proved that introducing test-based accountability too early in a child’s education harms their potential.

Teachers can now focus on developing their pupils’ true potential.

Revamping the curriculum, however, cannot be done hastily. Maszlee has formed a Policy Committee and National Education Advisory Council and engaged stakeholders to draw up proposals.

By ISMAWATI MOKHTAR.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2019/04/479215/maszlee-not-just-about-black-shoes

We should control our handphone use and not let it control us

Tuesday, April 16th, 2019
Smartphones connect us with friends and family, but nothing beats face-to-face communication. FILE PIC

YOU may read this article on your smartphone. If you’re not using your smartphone, it is most likely being charged, but within reach.

According to the Internet Users Survey conducted by the Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission last year, smartphones remain the most popular means for users to access the Internet, with nine of 10 Internet users going online using their handheld devices.

The use of smartphones increased by 3.7 per cent compared with 89.4 per cent in 2016, and these figures are projected to increase

Our smartphone is the first thing we look at when we wake up and the last thing before we go to sleep.

Many of us can’t go five minutes without checking our devices or feel anxious if we lose them or leave them at home. It has become common in casual conversation to refer to such behaviour as an addiction.

There is something you may not realise. Our overreliance on the global positioning system (GPS) may affect our navigational skills.

Before the use of GPS, we would try to remember routes and learn to read and understand maps when we wanted to go somewhere new. But now, without an Internet connection, we may get lost.

In Nature, a weekly science journal, Roger McKinlay refers to navigation as a “use-it-or-lose-it” skill. He says if we rely on machines to find our way, we might lose our natural sense of navigation.

Furthermore, many people fail to realise that addiction to smartphones can have a negative effect on a person’s thoughts, behaviours, tendencies, feelings and sense of wellbeing.

When we compare smartphone addiction to other types of addiction, such as alcohol, drug and gambling, they share similarities.

Feelings of anxiety and panic can be triggered when the addiction is not satisfied, and it contributes to poor attention and control.

A study by researchers from the University of Illinois, the United States, found that people who experience depression and anxiety often turn to their smartphones to cope or distract themselves from negative feelings.

In the long term, this could make these people more vulnerable to mental health issues.

In addition, excessive smartphone use may cause an impaired ability to remember, a lack of creative thinking and reduced attention span.

But how much smartphone use is too much? No one has an answer. More and more smartphones have a function that lets users check how much time they have spent on each application.

It helps users understand their habits and use of applications.

In addition, users can turn off notifications and set a reminder for the maximum time spent on applications.

To curb smartphone addiction, we should start using this function.

Other methods to reduce smartphone addiction would be for parents to set a daily or weekly session where no phones are allowed during family time.

It is undeniable that smartphones connect us with friends and family, but nothing beats face-to-face communication and connection between humans.

By ALEXANDER GOH.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2019/04/479783/we-should-control-our-handphone-use-and-not-let-it-control-us

Dividend from an ageing population

Tuesday, April 16th, 2019
There will be 6.3 million Malaysians aged 65 and older in 2040. FILE PIC

THE Department of Statistics has estimated that a baby born last year is expected to live up to 75 years. This is an increase of over 20 years in life expectancy since 1957. This extended longevity is largely due to improvements in living conditions and advancements in healthcare, which have contributed to lower mortality rates in recent decades.

It also reported that in 2017, the total fertility rate was 1.9, which is below the replacement level of 2.1. Total fertility rate is the average number of children a woman would have if she lives to the end of her childbearing years. Such statistics suggest that the average number of babies born per woman in Malaysia is insufficient to replace the mother and her partner. Declines in fertility rate usually raise alarm bells as it brings about negative prospects especially in terms of labour supply and family roles. Such declines are due, in part, to improvements in education and employment opportunities for women which cause them to delay marriage and hence childbirth. However, this trend is not entirely problematic.

BENEFITS AND OPPORTUNITIES

A decline in fertility and mortality lays the foundation for a period of accelerated economic growth called the demographic dividend, or the economic growth which may happen provided other economic factors are favourable. It results from changes in a country’s age structure as people shift from living short lives and having large families to living longer lives and having smaller families.

Having fewer children changes the population age structure where the number of young dependents becomes smaller relative to the working-age population, creating a bigger support base. In such a situation, production exceeds consumption, and fewer resources are needed to support the dependents. This frees up resources which could be channelled towards investment and economic development.

Smaller numbers of children in a household generally lead to larger investments per child, more freedom for women to enter the workforce and more household savings for old age. While in terms of government resources, it implies an expanding population of taxpayers relative to the number of dependents eligible for the benefits.

In theory, at the micro level, this may improve living standards for families and boost incomes per person; it can also result in significant gains in the economic development of a country at the macro level.

This is the first demographic dividend which Malaysia has been enjoying in decades, and is expected to end in 2029 when income growth slows, and the ageing of the population begins.

Economic growth resulting from the first demographic dividend depends on the enhancement of productivity of the working age population. The productivity of young adults is highly influenced by the quality of education and employment practices, technology and the timing and level of childbearing. It is imperative to have policies in place that make it easier for young parents to work and gender friendly labour policies that encourage higher female workforce participation while productivity at older ages depends on healthcare support, tax incentives and disincentives and the structure of pension schemes and retirement policies. Because the first demographic dividend is only temporary, countries should take advantage of this golden opportunity by implementing the above economic and social policies before it is too late.

Eventually, declines in fertility will reduce the growth rate of the working age population, while further improvements in mortality will extend lifespan causing the elderly population to grow faster. Keeping other factors equal, the growth of per capita income slows down, and the first dividend becomes negative.

There will be 6.3 million Malaysians aged 65 and older in 2040, and it takes merely 25 years for Malaysia to experience an ageing population where the 65-year olds constitute 15 per cent of the population. For perspective, France grew old within 115 years.

However, an ageing population opens up another window of opportunity — the second demographic dividend — where lower fertility and increasing life expectancy stimulate the accumulation of assets in all age groups. This is driven by old age consumption for a longer retirement period due to increasing life expectancy. With higher income per capita gained from the first demographic dividend and reduced child dependency as a result of fewer children, individuals are more able to prepare for old age consumption through savings and investment.

The preliminary computation done for Malaysia shows that it could expect positive growth of the second demographic dividend to last beyond 2060.

GOVERNMENT POLICIES

The extent to which the second demographic dividend is realised depends on how well a country provides support for its elderly. As the population ages more quickly, the resources needed to support the elderly increases. This may cause severe strains on the public pension system and family resources.

However, if workers can start accumulating assets earlier on, they can achieve more financial independence during retirement and depend less on the government and their families. In doing so, government policies and financial mechanisms relating to property, contributory pensions and personal savings must be put in place at the onset of the population ageing process to help workers accumulate assets. Another aspect of equal importance is financial literacy in order to educate the elderly on how to save money and utilise the accumulated wealth effectively.

Unlike the first demographic dividend, the second dividend is not transitory and continues indefinitely, where more wealth may lead to a permanent increase in income per capita.

However, the demographic dividend is a potential, not a destiny. To what extent the dividend can be realised is dependent on the right policies and implementation. These policies include education and labour, economic, pension and retirement, and healthcare support that would empower citizens and enhance productivity-driven growth.

Working towards seizing the demographic dividends means investing in our parents now and our children’s future. Creating opportunities and building them is our pay-it-forward responsibility.

By Datuk Dr Norma Mansor.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2019/04/479798/dividend-ageing-population

Early childhood education

Monday, April 15th, 2019

Early childhood education is beneficial for children ages 3, 4 and 5. It’s also often referred to as pre-school, pre-kindergarten, day care, nursery school or early education.

Early childhood education prepares young children for their transition into elementary school. Sending pre-school-age children to one of these early childhood education programs can make a positive impact on her and give her a head start toward a bright future.

Why is Early Childhood Education important?

The capacity of your child’s brain to soak up new learning peaks when your child is 3 years old.

At this point in your child’s life, she has the highest potential for learning new things.

While attending an early childhood education program, your child will improve her language and motor skills, while developing the learning and cognitive skills necessary to move on to primary school.

Attending a quality early childhood education program can benefit your child’s health as well.

Approximately 60 to 70 per cent of pre-school-age children attend an early childhood program or child care programme out of the home.

In addition, your child’s socio-emotional development is less likely to be adversely affected, with a decreased chance of needing behavioural or mental health care once she enters primary school.

Importance of Screenings

One of the many benefits of your child receiving an early childhood education is the opportunity to participate in early childhood screening.

This screening is provided for 3- to 5-year-olds and tests things like health, cognitive development, speech, vision, hearing, coordination, emotional skills and social skills.

Screenings can identify any development or health issues that need to be taken into consideration, to prevent learning delays.

Where can you study Early Childhood Education?

The Diploma in Early Childhood Education (ECE) is offered by the Open University of Malaysia (OUM).

The   programme at OUM  contributes  to the all-rounded development of ECE teachers by updating their knowledge, skills and attitude as ECE professionals.

The programme is tailor-designed for Early Childhood principals, administrators, teachers, care takers, childminders and those involved with young learners to ensure that they have the necessary and enriched knowledge about child development and assessment, curriculum content, children arts and music, learning and pedagogy, health and safety, and ECE-centre management skills.

Entry Requirements

The Normal Entry requirements are:

i. Pass SPM/SPMV/MCE or its equivalent, with minimum a credit in 3 subjects; or

ii. Pass UEC with minimum Grade B in 3 subjects; or

iii. Pass O-Level with minimum Grade C in 3 subjects; or

iv. Pass SKM Level 3 in Early Childhood/ Preschool Care and pass SPM with minimum a credit in 1 subject; or

v. Pass Community College Certificate equivalent to MQF Level 3 in related field and pass SPM with minimum a credit in 1 subject; or

vi. Pass Early Childhood Education Certificate (MQF Level 3) in related field with a minimum CGPA of 2.00; or

vii. Pass STPM or equivalent with a minimum Grade C (GP 2.00) in 1 subject; or

viii. Pass STAM with minimum grade of Maqbul; or

ix. Other qualifications recognized as equivalent by the Malaysian Government.

Note: Matured students above the age of 20 years with working experience can also apply provided they pass the APEL Assessment Test conducted by OUM.

Tuition Fee

The total tuition fee For the Dipolma programme at OUM is RM 12, 780.  The Duration of the course is four years. Financial aid is available to those who are eligible from:

1) PTPTN

2) EPF (Account 2)

3) Education or Personal Loan from commercial banks

4) HRDF (subject to employer’s eligibility)

5) OUM Flexible Payment Scheme.

The OUM Advantage

Those who are interested in pursuing the Diploma programme with OUM have the added advantage to “ Word and Study”.

If you are a school leaver or an adult interested in this programme you can work and take up this course on a part-time basis. For details contact the nearest OUM centre.

by Krishnan
Read more @
http://www.dailyexpress.com.my/interest/85/early-childhood-education/

Permata will now be called Genius

Monday, April 15th, 2019
Education Minister Dr Maszlee said, adding that the decision was made by the Cabinet to make the programme more competitive. NSTP/ROSELA ISMAIL
By Azzman Abdul Jamal - April 15, 2019 @ 5:10pm

NILAI: The National Permata programme (Permata) will now be called Genius as it is set to undergo a rebranding process, according to Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik.

“Eventhough its role and functions remain the same, several programmes within it will be enhanced in terms of quality,” Dr Maszlee said, adding that the decision was made by the Cabinet to make the programme more competitive.

Dr Maszlee was speaking after attending a programme at Sekolah Menengah Kebangsaan (SMK) Desa Cempaka, here, today.

Permata, a programme for early childhood education in Malaysia, was the brainchild of Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor, wife of former premier Datuk Seri Najib Razak.

Following Pakatan Harapan (PH) taking over the federal government from Barisan Nasional (BN), assurance was given that the programme would be retained but an audit would be conducted and improvements would be considered.

By Azzman Abdul Jamal.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2019/04/479702/permata-will-now-be-called-genius

Should examinations be abolished?

Monday, April 15th, 2019
Many of us managed to have enjoyable school experiences, develop skills, and learn a lot more about life besides what was formally taught to us in the classrooms. — File photo

Many of us managed to have enjoyable school experiences, develop skills, and learn a lot more about life besides what was formally taught to us in the classrooms. — File photo

SHOULD examinations be abolished? Decades ago, this was a popular and almost mandatory essay topic in secondary school. Every book of “Model Essays” had this on its list of essay topics and many passionate arguments around this theme were heard on the student debate stage.

Interest in this topic has remained steadfast throughout the decades in our school system although the lines between different forms of assessments, tests, and evaluations are not always clear. We don’t see the word “abolished” used very much in this context anymore.

After all, “abolish” is a rather strong word, often associated with heavier issues like governments and laws. And abolishing examinations in the broadest sense of the word may seem unthinkable.

After all, isn’t that what schools are meant for in the first place – to provide avenues for students to take examinations? And isn’t that the main job description of teachers? Many of us grew up indoctrinated into that belief all through our schooling life.

As children, we were used to the inevitable questions or comments by well-meaning relatives or friends: “What standard are you in now? When is your exam? What was your class position? Study hard, get good marks in the exam.” This was usually accompanied by a little tousling of the hair, a pat on the back, a smile. Hardly anyone ever said: “Enjoy school life, learn all you can, soak in all the knowledge, be curious, ask many questions, be polite, learn to be a good friend.” Nevertheless, many of us managed to have enjoyable school experiences, develop skills, and learn a lot more about life besides what was formally taught to us in the classrooms.

There was the “exam season” when we went around with our noses in revision notes, the last-minute cramming (for some), the nervous anticipation, the competition for the highest test scores or grades.

Then, there were the other parts of school life where learning occurred informally – the non-academic activities, school trips, games, concerts, drama, the fun with friends. We had our monthly and term examinations, report cards denoting our test scores, grades and class positions, and yes, we still managed to have equally huge chunks of fun in school.

At some indefinite point in the journey of our schooling system, a shadow seemed to have crept in and begin looming uneasily over school life. The examination part began morphing into a life form of its own and started engulfing everything else. Gradually, everything related to school began to be centred around examinations and other activities fell off into the peripheral areas – things to be gotten over quickly in order to return to the “real” business of schools, which was the preparation of students for the major examinations.

Teachers were gauged by the quality of their students’ examination performance. The more “straight As” students the school produced, the better the school was perceived to be. If something wasn’t going to be tested or be part of the major examinations, then there was no point “wasting” time over it.

Tuition classes mushroomed and flourished as parents frantically herded their children there, to be better prepared for the examinations. Even three-year-old children lugged backpacks to tuition classes after day care.

Distorting the true purpose of education

Education planners became increasingly concerned about the unbalanced emphasis on major examinations, which was slowly gnawing at the essence of school and distorting the true purpose of education. The presence of so many young people who, despite having gone through the school system and having graduated from institutions of higher education, lacked fundamental communication and critical thinking skills, rang further alarm bells.

Systems were revamped and alternative forms of assessment introduced. Continuous and classroom-based assessments for learning and development were encouraged to help teachers modify and prepare classroom teaching and learning according to their students’ needs. Teachers were reminded that formative assessment was just as important as summative assessment, or the big written examination at the end of everything.

Class positions were no longer deemed necessary because we didn’t want any student coming away with low self-esteem, feeling that they were at the bottom of the class. Differentiated forms of testing were encouraged to match different learning levels and needs.

The truth is that despite all the attempts to move towards assessment for progressing learning and informing teaching, it is still the major summative examinations that are calling the shots.

Perhaps it is because for too long, the entire education system has been focused on the idea that examinations reign supreme. The uneasy question is, would there be quality teaching and learning in schools if most of the major examinations were scrapped? Would the joy of learning for learning’s sake once again be revived in classrooms or would teachers suddenly feel crippled, having lost their foundation for teaching? Would they be able to independently assess their students to help them learn better and to help themselves teach better?

And on another note, how important are examination scores, positions and grades for a student? While it is never pleasant to find yourself at the bottom of the class, it may compel you to work harder to move upwards and not remain there.

I remember a time when it was these positions and grades that made us work that much harder in class; when that one mark which made the difference between an A and a B grade or a pass and a fail was so important. I remember the counting and recounting of test scores, how classmates checked each other’s test scripts to make sure that “teacher had marked our tests correctly”. We were

brilliant at peer assessment even then, simply because our positions depended on it. Top of the class and top of the form were enviable positions and worth striving towards.

So, not having grades or positions, while easing out potential feelings of demotivation, could also be unfair to others. It is like being in competitions where after so much effort and training, you are told that everyone is a winner and that there are no positions. It is also a disservice to those who have done poorly because they will never really know where they stand in the true picture of the situation.

So, is the thought of doing away with major school examinations in any way linked to the fear of not winning, or a preference to be in denial of true achievement or potential? Should they be removed from the system to give more place to assessments that actually develop both learner and teacher and help to further the truer cause of education?

By Dr G Mallika Vasugi
Read more @
https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2019/04/14/should-examinations-be-abolished/#t8PcvoYEI5kgTtSB.99

Malaysians win at Mathematical Olympiad

Monday, April 15th, 2019
The winning Malaysian team at the Thailand International Mathematical Olympiad 2019 in Phuket.

The winning Malaysian team at the Thailand International Mathematical Olympiad 2019 in Phuket.

YOUNG Malaysians have done the country proud at the Thailand International Mathematical Olympiad (TIMO) 2019 in Phuket.

Tang Kiat Leng, 10, from SJK (C) Puay Chai 2, and Tan Hong Sheng, 18, from Pei Chun High School bagged two Overall Champion awards in the Grade Four category and Senior Secondary group, respectively.

Kiat Leng, who also won the World Star Trophy and a free entry to TIMO Final 2020 for being the highest scorer, has been participating in Mathematical Olympiads since he was five.

He only dared to hope for a runner-up spot in his category, but was pleasantly surprised.

“I like Math as it’s about critical and logical thinking.

“I enjoy the problem solving and get great satisfaction from it. I do maths questions daily,” he said, adding that his achievements were the result of motivation and dedicated guidance from his parents and teachers.

Although he didn’t expect to win, Hong Sheng “hoped I was the best participant there”.

He said the award has made him more confident of himself.

“I’ve always believed that hard work pays. This proves it,” he said.

A believer in practice makes perfect, he tries to excel in everything related to Math.

It’s amazing how definitions, formulas, and principles, can bring about a great mathematical system, he said.

A total of 53 students from Malaysia joined the event held on April 6.

Team Malaysia bagged four Gold Awards, five Silver Awards, 17 Bronze Awards, and 27 Merit Awards.

Over 900 students from Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Ukraine, Bangladesh, Malaysia, Myanmar, Bulgaria, India, Indonesia, Philippines, Cambodia, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, and Australia, participated in the international competition.

TIMO is open to those in primary up to A-Levels or Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM).

By Christina Chin
Read more @
https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2019/04/14/malaysians-win-at-mathematical-olympiad/#iUvVtm1o8UBaKedG.99

Bringing Bahasa Melayu to the fore

Monday, April 15th, 2019
Teo (fourth from right) launching the MABBIM meet and unveiling the language body’s latest resource books.

Teo (fourth from right) launching the MABBIM meet and unveiling the language body’s latest resource books.

THE Education Ministry wants to widen the use of Bahasa Melayu (BM) not only within the country, but internationally.

Measures to promote it include requiring that students get at least a credit in the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM), organising the National Language Decade campaign, and working with non-governmental organisations to help improve the mastery of BM especially in vernacular schools.

“We also want Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka (DBP) to be the go-to body for BM like how the British Council is for English,” Deputy Education Minister Teo Nie Ching said when opening the 58th meeting of the Brunei Darussalam-Indonesia-Malaysia Language Council (MABBIM) at Wisma DBP in Kuala Lumpur on April 10.

Held from April 8 to 13, the event saw 11 papers presented at the MABBIM language seminar.

“Closer collaborations between Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei can make that happen.”

In his speech, DBP director-general Datuk Abang Salehuddin Abang Shokeran said, since its inception 47 years ago, MABBIM has carried out various efforts to build and promote BM and Bahasa Indonesia, including publishing dictionaries, and research and resource books, and organising language workshops.

“BM is an important language of communication in South East Asia. We’re drawing up plans to make it an international language amidst the challenges of IR 4.0 (Fourth Industrial Revolution).”

By Christina Chin
Read more @
https://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2019/04/14/bringing-bahasa-melayu-to-the-fore/#IviEmdUfS3qsDxpi.99

SIDMA College English Enhancement Programme (EEP)

Friday, April 12th, 2019

SIDMA College Sabah through the dynamic leadership of its leaders; Adjunct Prof Dr Morni Hj Kambrie (Founder and Chairman) and Madam Azizah Khalid Merican (CEO) have been very consistent and determined in their effort to produce graduates who are not only proficient in Bahasa Malaysia, but also graduates who are confident and comfortable while engaging themselves in conversation using English. This is due to the simple fact that English has been widely spoken and used in Malaysia for many years, so much so that it has automatically become the second language of the country.

Although the medium of instruction at public institutions of higher learning is the national language (Bahasa Malaysia), SIDMA College uses dual languages (Bahasa Malaysia and English) as its medium of instruction, owing to the importance of English in the new knowledge economy and the Industrial Revolution 4.0. Furthermore English has been spoken widely by many Malaysians in and outside of their homes.

English Enhancement Programme (EEP), a special English Proficiency programme developed by SIDMA College Sabah, aims to help SIDMA College students who lack confidence and proficiency in using English as the language of communication, to upgrade their English basic proficiency skills in order to achieve their personal potentials and professional goals.

SIDMA’s EEP, a 28 contact hour’s programme which was launched by Madam Azizah Khalid Merican on 14 February 2017; focus on providing intensive training in reading, writing, listening, and presentation skills. According to Madam Jenifah Abdullah, the key module writer and facilitator of the programme, EEP’s main focus is on providing equity to these identified students by using different teaching and learning models and methods such as the use of English Language newspaper, visitation to various places of interest, in order to motivate and facilitate them in their pursuit of being excellent in their English Language usage. It provide opportunities for the students to explore the basic grammar concepts as well as their basic vocabulary, all of which are to be mastered and applied in their study as well as in the real-life situations, particularly in their future field of work.

On 9 April 2019, Madam Jenifah took the opportunity to organise an educational tour to Borneo Ant House Gallery located at Tuaran for the 25 students from January and February 2019 semester. Prior to the trip, they were told to “explore, inquire and discuss about what it is like to live and work in the mini Theme Park, and the lesson learn from it. The students were expected to describe the gallery, uniqueness of living in the gallery, the ants replicas displayed. They were expected to think and discussed with their friends, as well as with the personnel’ of the gallery on the some of the moral values and uniqueness of living like ants, such as hardworking, collaborating, caring and more. Based on the lesson learnt from ants, the students were also expected to come up with a simple formula to achieve success in life such as:

  • In order to be a successful person, one must be active, persistent, persevere, diligent, energetic, hard-working, industrious and lively.

Upon their arrival, the students were welcomed by the park personnel who then introduced and show them around the different sections of the gallery. The students were later given the opportunity to explore and discussed with the gallery personnel and their group about the assignments.

The feedback that Madam Jenifah got from the personnel on duty at the gallery has been very encouraging. They said that SIDMA students tried their best to communicate with them in English. The students were asking thinking questions that required long answers and not just requiring a simple “yes” or “no” as answer.

Madam Jenifah stressed that the main focus of the field trip is basically to act as a tool to enhance classroom learning by making connection with the real world. It is for the students to apply their contextual learning in the classroom to reinforce their experiential learning outside the classroom.

Madam Jenifah took the opportunity to thank Adjunct Prof Dr Morni, Madam Azizah Khalid Merican, Madam Azlina Ngatimin, and Madam Nancy Pishori as well all heads of departments, lecturers and staff for their support in assisting her to conduct the smooth and successfully trip. She too congratulated the students for their commitment to communicate in English throughout the journey and hope that they will keep practising on it.

SIDMA College Sabah provides opportunities for its students to understand their true potentials, and helped them to become the best person they can be. Below are the courses currently being offered, for one to consider for admission at SIDMA College Sabah:

  1. Foundation in Management:
    • It is a preparatory programme for one year. Upon successful completion, students will gain an entry qualification to degree programmes in area of Education (including Early Childhood Education), Business Administration, Management, and more.
  2. Diploma Courses:
    • Diploma in Early Childhood Education
    • Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health.
  3. Bachelor Degree Courses:
    • Bachelor of Education (Hons)
    • Bachelor of Early Childhood Education (Hons)
    • Bachelor of Business Administration (Hons)
    • Bachelor of Management (Hons)

Financial assistance such as Education Loan from the National Higher Education Fund (Perbadanan Tabung Pendidikan Tinggi Nasional – PTPTN) is available upon request.

For more information about courses offered at SIDMA College Sabah, please browse SIDMA Website, or like SIDMA Facebook Account – SIDMA College. .One can also visit SIDMA College Campus located at Jalan Bundusan, 88300 Kota Kinabalu. You may also visit https://sbah.sidma.edu.my/sidmalearning/landingpage_form to register.

For more information, please call SIDMA Hotline: 088-732 000 or 088-732 020..

Read more @ https://www.sidma.edu.my/index.php/en/all-bulletin/89-news/212-sidma-college-english-enhancement-programme-eep

SIDMA College Outreach Programme at Methodist Kindergarten Kota Kinabalu

Friday, April 12th, 2019

SIDMA College Sabah in its effort to produce Early Childhood Educators (ECE) equipped with the necessary competencies expected in a 21st Century workplace, provides an actionable framework for its students, who are also future teachers, to implement a long term professional development plan that will extend their professional development beyond daily classroom lectures in order to create “coaching culture” enabling lecturers to provide the necessary scaffolding.

Towards this end, the college has introduced a variety of forms of delivery technique to enhance its students’ learning. This is to provide various forms of interactions and participations for these future teachers to select their “tools” and “components” from a diverse “pools of blended options”.

As these currents ECE trainees are facing little or no access to the outside world, particularly for them to understand and interact with their future kids, Miss Nur Syafiqah Binti Usno, SIDMA’s Early Childhood Lecturer, with the full support and collaboration of the college management team, her colleagues and the 105 semester four (4) ECE students, conducted an Early Science Expo at Methodist Kindergarten, Kota Kinabalu recently.

The main focus of the programme was to let these future ECE teachers to communicate and engage with the kindergarten kids, to capture and reflect on their experience on how to interact and react with these kids, as well as to find out their strength, weakness and determining improvements needed when handling these children..

The ECE students were divided into groups, and they have set up nine booths at Methodist Kindergarten Hall for the function. Each booth were packed with objects – natural objects, 3D models, carts, pictures (cards), computers and CD, colour pencils, drawing papers, hand outs (worksheets), I-think maps, toys, balls, crayons, big book, all relating to the twelve main themes of the kindergarten curriculum.

All the children from Methodist Kindergarten were invited to participate in the event. Led by their respective teacher, the kids were initially given the opportunity to engage themselves with all materials being displayed in each station, make inquiries, give their opinions, comments; all being facilitated by their teachers as well as our SIDMA students.

The next activities required the kindergarten students to perform some sort of experiments or classification activities either in groups or individually; and again being facilitated by SIDMA students as their facilitators. All activities are to enhance the kids’ abilities and skills to make use of their senses, particularly in making observation, giving simple remarks, labelling and recoding it in the i-think map provided, and more.

According to Miss Nur Syafiqah, SIDMA students have really enjoyed themselves and benefitted from the event. They realised that although the kids are only from kindergarten, but their English mastery, their knowledge, thinking and inquiry skills are very high, especially the six (6) years old kids who have gone through the twelve (12) learning themes with their teachers. They are quite knowledgeable and very enthusiastic; and are very keen to find out and learn more from the expo.

The students realised that to be teachers in kindergarten is not a relaxing career, but a very demanding one. They really got to read and understand kids’ behaviour better and being able to fulfil the children inquisitive instinct of asking and wanting to know more. Most important and most urgently needed is that they got to upgrade their mastery of English Language.

SIDMA College Sabah provides opportunities for its students to understand their true potentials, and helped them to become the best person they can be. Below are the courses currently being offered, for one to consider for admission at SIDMA College Sabah:

1. Foundation in Management:

It is a preparatory programme for one year. Upon successful completion, students will gain an entry qualification to degree programmes in area of Education     (including Early Childhood Education), Business Administration, Management, and more.

2. Diploma Courses:

  • Diploma in Early Childhood Education
  • Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health.

3. Bachelor Degree Courses:

  • Bachelor of Education (Hons)
  • Bachelor of Early Childhood Education (Hons)
  • Bachelor of Business Administration (Hons)
  • Bachelor of Management (Hons)

Financial assistance such as Education Loan from the National Higher Education Fund (Perbadanan Tabung Pendidikan Tinggi Nasional – PTPTN) is available upon request.

For more information about courses offered at SIDMA College Sabah, please browse SIDMA Website, or like SIDMA Facebook Account – SIDMA College. .One can also visit SIDMA College Campus located at Jalan Bundusan, 88300 Kota Kinabalu. You may also visit https://sbah.sidma.edu.my/sidmalearning/landingpage_form to register.

For more information, please call SIDMA Hotline: 088-732 000 or 088-732 020.

Read more @ https://www.sidma.edu.my/index.php/en/all-bulletin/89-news/211-sidma-college-outreach-programme-at-methodist-kindergarten-kota-kinabalu