Archive for June, 2020

Don’t be complacent, Dr Noor Hisham reminds Malaysians

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020
Health director-general Datuk Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah said instead the public should remain vigilant and abide by the standard operating procedures (SOPs) as outlined by the ministry and take preventive measures at all times. - Bernama picHealth director-general Datuk Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah said instead the public should remain vigilant and abide by the standard operating procedures (SOPs) as outlined by the ministry and take preventive measures at all times. – Bernama pic

KUALA LUMPUR: The Health Ministry has called on Malaysians not to be complacent with the dwindling new Covid-19 cases in the country.

Health director-general Datuk Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah said instead the public should remain vigilant and abide by the standard operating procedures (SOPs) as outlined by the ministry and take preventive measures at all times.

He said with more sectors set to reopen starting tomorrow (July 1), public cooperation was crucial in the country’s effort to break the Covid-19 transmission chain.

“To ensure a smooth recovery process, the government has established standard operating procedures for (various) sectors and sub-sectors.

“High compliance of these SOPs is paramount in ensuring that new Covid-19 cases continue to decline,” he said.

On this note, Dr Noor Hisham highlighted World Health Organisation chief Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus’ warning made during a virtual briefing that Covid-19 global cases were “actually speeding up”.

He quoted the WHO chief who had said: “We all want this to be over. We all want to get on with our lives.

But the hard reality is this is not even close to being over.”

Dr Noor Hisham said although most sectors of the economy had reopened and were fully operational, the spread of Covid-19 within the community remained under control.

“This proves that the country’s recovery has already begun. Nonetheless, Covid-19 monitoring and surveillance are still on-going to ensure the coronavirus transmission in the community can be detected early.”

On June 26, Senior Minister (Security Cluster) Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri had announced the reopening of three tourism sub-sectors namely Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions (MICE); travel and trip fairs; and spa, wellness and reflexology centres from tomorrow (July 1).

Previously, Ismail Sabri had also announced the reopening of preschools and kindergartens; cinemas and theatres; recreational activities at swimming pools, and theme parks from July 1, along with wedding ceremonies and birthday parties.

By Nor Ain Mohamed Radhi.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2020/06/604804/dont-be-complacent-dr-noor-hisham-reminds-malaysians

CIDB keeping close watch on construction sites during RMCO

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020
The Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB)  has checked=The Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB) has checked in total 2,561 construction sites and discovered 477 of them did not adhere to the SOPs. – BERNAMA/File pic

KUALA LUMPUR: The Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB) has inspected 74 construction sites involving 128 officers on Monday.

Senior Minister (Security Cluster) Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob said 61 of these construction sites had complied to the Recovery Movement Control Order (RMCO) standard operating procedures (SOPs); five others failed to do so with warning issued, and eight sites were not in operation.

“Up to yesterday (Monday), CIDB has checked in total 2,561 construction sites and discovered 477 of them did not adhere to the SOPs and have been warned. Nineteen other sites were slapped with a closure order,” he said in a statement.

Since March 30, Ismail Sabri said, relevant agencies under the Housing and Local Government Ministry had carried out 9,039 public sanitisation operations, covering 134 zones.

“During these operations, 12,590 premises have been sanitised comprising 2,677 business centres, 5,453 government buildings, 1,591 residential areas including the People’s Housing Projects (PPRs), 2,515 public areas, and 354 supermarkets.

“Yesterday (June 29), 28 sanitisation operations were done covering 23 zones in nine states such as Sabah (11), Malacca (6), and Terengganu (3),” he said.

By Teh Athira Yusof.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2020/06/604732/cidb-keeping-close-watch-construction-sites-during-rmco

Five ways to avoid Covid-19 infection

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020
Wearing a mask and washing our hands with soap regularly can help contain the spread of Covid-19. -Pic for illustrations purposes onlyWearing a mask and washing our hands with soap regularly can help contain the spread of Covid-19. -Pic for illustrations purposes only

LETTER: The recent single-digit figures of new daily cases of Covid-19 point to a fairly good job in containing the spread of the disease by the Health Ministry.

With the gradual relaxation of rules pertaining to selected sectors of the economy, we are slowly going back to normal. The danger is this: we think that we are almost done with Covid-19 – but I’m afraid the virus is not done with us!

The fact is that we don’t know what we are against. The entire global community is still trying very hard to shed more light on this invisible enemy that has caused so much havoc. And until a cure or vaccine is found, our lives can never be the same as before the Movement Control Order (MCO). We have to continue to act responsibly and take the necessary precautions.

In this regard, we have to develop fresh habits or ways of doing things to protect ourselves and those we come in contact with. Here are a few which we should learn to internalise:

1. We are used to window shopping when we visit malls, but this has to change. For now, it’s a no to window shop. Go visit the shopping mall by all means, but be quick about it. Go straight to the particular shop/outlet or section of the departmental store and grab the dress/shoe/handbag you want – no dilly dallying please.

If your intended destination is crowded, then go elsewhere. The virus could be waiting for you in the long queue. Then have your food and leave immediately – less chit-chatting or immersing yourself on your smartphone. You should try to spend the least time possible at crowded places.

2. When using public transportation such as the LRT or bus, avoid travelling during peak hours where possible. If the bus or train is full, then wait for the next.

3. Establishment owners too must play their part and not let their guard down: At the entrances of a few shops or restaurants I have visited, the owners do not take pains to ensure that every customer follows social distancing rules.

In the worst case scenario, the self-service concept is practised where customers take their own temperatures. In other cases, the proprietors let in more than the permitted number of shoppers at one time as stated on the signage.

4. We tend to let our guard down (not intentionally) especially when we are having a good time with close friends and buddies; for instance, at the bistro or drinking holes, customers don’t bother much about practising social distancing.

At the park, people forget to keep the one-metre distance as they queue up to go in and some hug their friends they have not met for a long time.

5. No matter where we are or how deficient or poor the signage is at a facility (eg shopping mall), it is our individual duty to act responsibly by keeping a safe distance of at least one metre from other persons.

If all of us are mindful of this simple etiquette and observe it conscientiously at all times (in addition to wearing a mask and washing our hands with soap regularly), we can help contain the spread of Covid-19.

by POLA SINGH.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2020/06/604790/five-ways-avoid-covid-19-infection

Just two new Covid-19 cases today

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020
Health director-general Datuk Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah said both cases are Malaysian, with one being a local transmission, and the other an imported case. - NSTP file picHealth director-general Datuk Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah said both cases are Malaysian, with one being a local transmission, and the other an imported case. – NSTP file pic

KUALA LUMPUR: The Health Ministry recorded two new Covid-19 cases as of noon today, bringing the tally of cumulative cases in Malaysia to 8,639.

Health director-general Datuk Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah said both cases are Malaysian, with one being a local transmission, and the other an imported case.

“The locally-transmitted case was detected during pre-surgery screening at Kota Belud Hospital in Sabah; while the other is an individual who returned from abroad,” he said in a statement today.

Dr Noor Hisham said the number of active cases stands at 164.

Meanwhile, 20 more patients have recovered and were discharged from hospitals, bringing the rate of recovery to 96.7 per cent (8,354 cases).

“Four patients are being treated in the intensive care unit, with one on ventilator support.

“No fatality from the virus was reported to the Crisis Preparedness and Response Centre (CPRC) as at noon today, keeping the death toll at 121 (1.4 per cent),” he added.

By Nor Ain Mohamed Radhi.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2020/06/604773/just-two-new-covid-19-cases-today

Most students happy with dates set by Education Ministry

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020

PETALING JAYA: Candidates for major school examinations are happy with the new dates (see chart) given by the Education Ministry.

Form Five student Nura Hanesa Haslimi of SMK Aminuddin Baki, Kuala Lumpur, now just wants to focus on sitting for SPM and finishing secondary school.

“I prefer the SPM to be held in January rather than February or March even though it means sacrificing my year-end holidays (for revision) and the New Year celebration.”

Worried that a delay in the exam could mean a later start to her tertiary education, Nura Hanesa was confident that students would have enough time to prepare.

A Form Five student from Selangor who declined to be named also preferred SPM to be held in January even though the new dates were “too near the school holidays”.

“Although online classes held during the movement control order (MCO) are helpful, it is not as effective as face-to-face learning.

“So having the exams in January gives us enough time to study and prepare, ” she said, adding that she was grateful to teachers who worked tirelessly to ensure their students’ academic progress and well-being.

Although she would have liked more time for revision, Form Five student Sudeepta Suresh Kumar from SMK Bandar Utama Damansara 4 does not want the ministry to delay the exam dates anymore as it will affect her college admission.

“I’d rather sit for the exam in January than to push it any further. We’ve already wasted nearly three months during the MCO.”

Another Form Five student who wanted to be identified as Nairobi, was glad the ministry finally announced the exam dates.

He hoped students would be able to complete the syllabus and revision in time.

“Conducting exams later would cause problems such as space issues for other students.”

Form Five student Jasmine Loh Velu from SMP (P) Methodist, Ipoh, said she was in no rush to sit for SPM.

“It is too near the holidays, which seems rather unfair to both students and teachers. I would love the extra time to catch up on all that I’ve missed during the lockdown instead of rushing through it, ” she said.

A teacher from Selangor said it would be best if exams were held earlier. Otherwise, the new batch of 2021 students and their teachers would have to start school later.

“Teachers welcome the move but please don’t keep us in the dark.

“Unless the ministry decides to start the 2021 schedule for the other secondary school students in March, I don’t think teachers who have to mark exam papers at the same time will be able to cope with next year’s classes, ” he said, warning that senior teachers could opt for early retirement due to the added stress and pressure of working non-stop.

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2020/06/30/most-students-happy-with-dates-set-by-education-ministry#cxrecs_s

Best protection against Covid-19

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020

The ProXmask90V is made of comfortable, stretchable fabric.

PROLEXUS has launched its revolutionary anti-virus protective mask ProXmask90V that can provide optimal protection against Covid-19.

Designed and engineered with its ProX technology, the ProXmask90V is marketed as being able to inactivate 99.9% of SARS-CoV-2 that causes Covid-19, other coronaviruses as well as influenza viruses and bacteria.

The anti-virus technology in the mask fabric developed with an European textile chemical manufacturer features the presence of active positive charges on the fabric – as binding sites for viruses.

Upon contact with the fabric, the virus cells which are negatively charged are neutralised, leading to rapid destruction of its glycoprotein layers.

In tests, the treated fabric was contaminated with a known concentration of SARS-CoV-2. The measurement that followed showed a reduction of over 99.9% of SARS-CoV-2 on the fabric relative to the inoculum control.

It also comes with a water repellency feature and is fitted with an innovative self-developed microfiltration structure, which captures and deactivates viruses and bacteria down to a microscopic scale of 1,000 times smaller than a millimeter.

ProXmask90V is engineered to deliver five-layer protection through the application of advanced textile technology. It is manufactured by Honsin Apparel Sdn Bhd, a subsidiary of Prolexus, with its manufacturing licence approved by the Malaysian Investment Development Authority.

“ProXmask90V is washable and reusable up to 60 times,” said Prolexus innovation and development manager Dr Harintharavimal Balakrishnan.

“It is more cost effective as compared to purchasing 120 disposable masks. People have overlooked the environmental impact of disposable masks in our fight against Covid-19. In the current pandemic, if millions were to use two disposable masks a day, we will generate tonnes of plastic landfill waste.”

For more details, call 1700-81-8398, email info@proxmask.com or visit www.prolexus.com.my/proxmask.

Read more @ https://www.thestar.com.my/metro/metro-news/2020/06/30/best-protection-against-covid-19

Hypermarket staff indifferent to S.O.P.

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020
Hypermarkets and eateries must ensure that customers entering their premises will have their temperature and contact number recorded before they are allowed in. -NSTP/ASWADI ALIASHypermarkets and eateries must ensure that customers entering their premises will have their temperature and contact number recorded before they are allowed in. -NSTP/ASWADI ALIAS

LETTER: Hypermarkets and eateries must ensure that customers entering their premises will have their temperature and contact number recorded before they are allowed in. It is inviting trouble if such precautions are not followed.

Last Friday, I went to a hypermarket at 8.50am to buy milk. There were only two tables near the escalator with no security personnel or staff on duty to ensure recording was done.

There was no register either for me to record my details, including that of others. Just as the hypermarket opened for business on Level 1 at 9am, I informed a staff member of the issue, but she looked the other way.

I related the issue to another staff member. Instead of appreciating me for what I had to tell him, he shouted at me in front of other customers, saying that the recording was being done.

Just before leaving the car park, I went back to where the recording of information is supposed to be done. The guard told me the counter was opened only at 9am.

It must be noted that many customers go before the opening of the store to avoid congestion during a time like this where recording of information and social distancing are elements of the standard operating procedures (SOP).

What irked me was the lackadaisical attitude and the rudeness of the staff members. They’re taking the importance of the SOP lightly.

At an eatery, customers were left to record their information, including taking their temperature. There was no staff at the entrance to ensure correct recording was done, especially temperature.

Just as I got home at 9.35am, I called the Subang Jaya Municipal Council and told the employee who took my call that I wanted to speak to an officer to make a complaint about to non-compliance of SOP.

She told me to give my contact number, which would be recorded into the system. I hung up as I was taken aback. What is the point of just giving my contact number without me relating the information?

The authorities are working so hard to ensure that the SOP is followed to contain the virus, yet there are others with an indifferent attitude. Frontliners are risking their lives working round the clock. Isn’t it better to be safe than sorry?

by WILLIAM DENNIS.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2020/06/604255/hypermarket-staff-indifferent-sop

The dangers of stress eating

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020

Binge-eating to cope with stress coupled with inactivity may result in diabetes and ultimately, kidney disease, writes Meera Murugesan

WHEN Lisa (not her real name) was younger, she didn’t give much thought to her diet. She enjoyed eating and loved going to new restaurants with her friends.

At home, she constantly snacked while watching TV. Her weight wasn’t ideal. On top of that, she didn’t exercise.

Today, Lisa is one of the 40,000 dialysis patients in Malaysia and sadly, many more will join her.

One in five adults, or about 3.9 million people aged 18 and above in Malaysia, suffer from diabetes, according to the recently-released National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS 2019).

Diabetes is a key risk factor for kidney disease. The diabetes prevalence in Malaysia is 18.3 per cent now, compared to 13.4 per cent in 2015.

According to the nationwide survey, 49 per cent of diabetics in the country have never been screened or diagnosed with the disease.

Inactivity is also on the rise. NHMS 2019 shows that one in four adults aged 16 and above in Malaysia is not physically active, and about 50 per cent of adults are overweight, all risk factors for diabetes and kidney disease.

Be mindful of what you eat as diabetes is on the rise. Picture: Designed by Freepik.Be mindful of what you eat as diabetes is on the rise. Picture: Designed by Freepik.

PANDEMIC PATTERN

This trend could worsen given the current pandemic as more people turn to binge-eating to cope with anxiety over finances, job instability and personal health.

Exercise or physical activity rates are also low as more individuals stay home over fears of Covid-19.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has predicted that Asia will have the highest number of diabetics by 2030.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often associated with diabetes. The most common causes of CKD point back to how we lead our lives.

“Diabetes will harm the blood vessels, causing multiple organ damage to the heart, kidneys, brain and eyes,” says Mahkota Medical Centre internal medicine and nephrology specialist Dr Yew Shiong Shiong.

There are many small blood vessels known as glomeruli in the kidneys. These function as filters of waste products for the body, he explains.

Diabetes is a disease of abnormal high sugars in the body and the glomeruli will become damaged if blood sugars are not controlled.

Left unchecked for too long, they can proceed to progressive and irreversible damage to kidney function, resulting in end stage renal failure where patient needs lifelong therapy like dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Inactivity and stress eating has been on the rise, more so with the pandemic. Picture: Designed by Freepik.Inactivity and stress eating has been on the rise, more so with the pandemic. Picture: Designed by Freepik.

DON’T WAIT

Chronic kidney disease can be totally asymptomatic – only detectable as protein in the urine if you do a urine test.

But as it progresses, patients may experience swelling, lethargy, pallor and shortness of breath. In the very critical and late stages, patients may have seizures and persistent vomiting.

Most don’t even realise that their kidneys are failing.

“In poorly controlled cases, it takes an average of three to five years from the onset of diabetes to result in diabetic kidney diseases. Up to one third of diabetic patients are at risk of kidney damage,” says Dr Yew.

The damage is usually reversible if the duration is less than three months. However, as diabetes is a persistent disease and may be poorly controlled in some patients for months or years, the damage would usually be non-reversible.

The disease doesn’t just affect the individual; public spending on CKD is on an increase as well.

In 2016, that figure was RM1.12 billion (according to the Economic Burden of End-Stage Renal Disease to the Malaysian Healthcare System), which is 25 times higher than the overall average health spending per person.

It is estimated that this year, public spending will increase to RM2 billion and RM4 billion by 2040.

TAKE CHARGE OF YOUR HEALTH

Ultimately, you are in charge of your health and CKD is not something you should leave to chance, says Dr Yew.

Prevention is better than cure so stay active, exercise, eat less sugary foods and less carbohydrates, especially if you are diabetic.

If you are already a kidney patient, you need to watch your salt and protein intake according to the stage of damage.

“For really late stage patients, they need to limit potassium and phosphate,” advises Dr Yew.

He adds that if you are at risk of CKD, not only do you need to maintain a healthy and balanced diet and lifestyle, you need to have proper health follow-up as your doctor will need to consistently monitor the disease to avoid unexpected deterioration of your health.

“You can’t always prevent CKD, especially if your genes have something to do with it. However, making lifestyle changes cannot be emphasised enough and these can help slow the progression of kidney disease. It could even save your life.”

Dr Yew says making lifestyle changes cannot be emphasised enough.

Dr. Yew says making lifestyle changes cannot be emphasised enough.

meera@mediaprima.com.my

SHOCKING DATA

WHAT the National Health and Morbidity Survey 2019 reveals:

* 3.9 million diabetics.

* 49 per cent never screened/diagnosed.

* Highest numbers in Negri Sembilan, Perlis and Pahang.

* 50 per cent of adults overweight.

By Meera Murugesan.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/lifestyle/heal/2020/06/604598/dangers-stress-eating

Putting the right spin on things

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020
(FILES) In this file photo taken on June 23, 2020, Palestinians participate in a big rally to protest against Israel's plan to annex parts of the occupied West Bank, in Jericho. - International condemnation of possible Israeli annexations has mounted ahead of July 1, when the Jewish state could take its first steps toward implementing part of a US-proposed Middle East peace plan. (Photo by ABBAS MOMANI / AFP)(FILES) In this file photo taken on June 23, 2020, Palestinians participate in a big rally to protest against Israel’s plan to annex parts of the occupied West Bank, in Jericho. – International condemnation of possible Israeli annexations has mounted ahead of July 1, when the Jewish state could take its first steps toward implementing part of a US-proposed Middle East peace plan. (Photo by ABBAS MOMANI / AFP)

BRITISH novelist Aldous Huxley once wrote: “There are things known and there are things unknown, and in-between are the doors of perception.” But, for many of us it is these doors of perception that forever colour our thinking and judgment on things.

Admit it — we are all guilty of forming lasting first impressions. How many of us actually wait until the whole sordid scandal unfolds before we form our judgment? That’s why rebuttals and counter-arguments that come a day or two after a news piece is out are rarely effective. This is why people rarely believe the authorities — because it takes bureaucracy at least two days to draft a rebuttal.

This is also why, in this age of social media, Internet and immediate news, “spin doctors” are more important than ever. These are teams of individuals who know what will tug at the heartstrings of the ordinary man, what will stir people to action, and what will capture the interest of the reader.

A good public relations expert will be able to predict what will be sensational newsworthy story, and either head it off first, or capitalise on it. But a spin doctor is one who can twist and turn the facts in such a way that a different angle is seen, without actually telling an all-out lie.

Last week, a particularly disturbing tweet went viral. The Twitter feed of the Israel Defence Forces (IDF) spoke of how Malaysia had donated a million masks and 500,000 disposable gloves. At first glance, it seemed as if Malaysia had made the donation to Israel, which would have been ludicrous since Malaysia does not recognise Israel nor do we have any diplomatic relations with it.

Then I remembered a small article in our newspapers a month ago, where the foreign minister had informed the Malaysian media that as part of its global effort in combating Covid-19, it would be sending a million masks and half a million gloves to the people of Palestine.

Re-reading the tweet, you can see how well-placed words can give the casual reader the wrong impression — that Malaysia was joining forces with Israel in its fight against Covid-19. Extraordinary. Spin doctor at work.

If you missed that previous information about the nature of the donation that Malaysia sent to the Occupied Palestinian Territories more than four weeks ago, the tweet by the IDF would have had us question just what Malaysia was up to, and if Malaysia’s foreign policy had fallen so far beyond the pale.

To be fair, the tweet did not lie, but it did attempt to mislead. I am reminded of a particular incident in Washington DC almost 20 years ago. My senior, who was a very distinguished person with an impressive stature in the organisation, had sent a report to headquarters.

The report referred to a private breakfast with Senator John McCain, an important man in Congress. Those who have had dealings with people on the Hill know how difficult it is to get a congressman out to lunch, much less breakfast, and much less a very senior congressman at that.

Needless to say, everyone was very impressed. I thought it was especially elegant how my senior took it in stride and did not make a big deal out of what was essentially a coup of the century. My admiration for such a person grew. A few months later, I was speaking to a friend about McCain. Imagine my surprise when my friend said that he had also attended the breakfast meeting my boss wrote about.

A few interrogative questions later yielded the truth – the “breakfast meeting” was actually a breakfast event where McCain was guest speaker. There were about 200 people in the room listening to the Senator’s speech and he did not dally after the event to speak to anyone privately.

Ha! The spin was in the omission. Yes, it was a private breakfast because all guests were there upon invitation of the organisers, but the report did not refer to this. Neither did it say there were 199 other people in the room. My admiration grew even more.

This is why spin doctors are so valued — they put out the “right” image of even the most mundane of events. People will still believe what they want, so the skill is in making them believe what we want them to believe. Let the reader beware!

By Dr Shazelina Zainul Abidin.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2020/06/604377/putting-right-spin-things

Not easy to take care of work and family during restrictions

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020
Many academician mums like me are caught in a tight spot as we were asked to return to work while schools and childcare centres remain closed. -Pic for illustrations purposes only Many academician mums like me are caught in a tight spot as we were asked to return to work while schools and childcare centres remain closed. -Pic for illustrations purposes only

LETTER: The other night, i was drafting a letter to apply for working from home as Malaysia is entering the Recovery Movement Control Order (RMCO). Many academician mums like me are caught in a tight spot as we were asked to return to work while schools and childcare centres remain closed.

I found myself spending hours waiting for the official emails from the administration and drafting letters applying for permission to work from home. Then, I spent time recording activities that I plan to do for the upcoming week, reporting these to the university on several platforms, for administrators to monitor our progress.

Will working from home affect our promotion later, and eventually our pension, as we don’t log in or out on the university’s system like we did in the office? This creates more stress. Our support system? Almost none, except for other mums who are in the same boat. Some of us are starting to express our concerns and frustrations in our WhatsApp group discussions, but nothing else can be done at this time.

Meanwhile, finding alternate options for childcare is not promising as friends and close family members are facing the same situation. In Asia, the elderly taking care of grandchildren is the norm.

Yet, with ageing parents to care for themselves, they often have no energy left to care of our kids, who are supposed to be our responsibility. An alternative way was for us to take our children to our office, but this is not allowed for children below 10. Is it even safe to do so, considering potential exposure to the virus?’

Also, the children would not have the same quality of stimulating and enriching care as they would in a day care or a school as they would just be sitting at a parent’s workplace.

Mothers in virtually every career who are being called to return to work in office are facing this challenge. What support can be offered by our society to care for their children?

What will ensure that women in this situation can contribute to the success and maintenance of society during this pandemic? We need to start the discussion now.

by DR SHIN YING CHU.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2020/06/604257/not-easy-take-care-work-and-family-during-restrictions