Enhancing our science education

Compared to other subjects, students see learning of science as mainly the transmission of facts and contents that are of little relevance to life.

RECENTLY attention has been on the lack of interest among our students in Science in schools.

This issue perhaps needs elaboration and continued engagement because in the context of the K-economy and Malaysia’s developmental policies, science, technology and innovation (STI) are critical drivers.

The current data seems to show that our manpower needs in important areas such as engineering, ICT, health and agriculture are still far from adequate (our unfulfilled needs range from 30% to 50%). Then how about our need for Science teachers?

There are also indicators that highlight the critical need for Malaysia’s Gross Expenditure on R&D (GERD) to be boosted.

According to one source, as an STI funder Malaysia ranks fourth behind Tunisia, Turkey and Morocco among OIC countries in terms of GERD being a percentage of GDP.

At a recent international science education symposium at the University of Uppsala in Sweden, attended by researchers from all over the world, the gravity of the situation in the decline in the interest in science was declared in a “statement of concern” which began with the sharing of actual worldwide data confirming the range of interest as being from “little” to active dislike for science.

Compared to other subjects, students see learning of Science as mainly the transmission of facts and contents that are of little relevance to life as well as Science being more “difficult” than other subjects.

by Prof. Datin Dr. Azizan Baharuddin.

Read more @ http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2012/2/28/focus/10815621&sec=focus

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