Promoting Malaysian education

Idris having a light moment with participants after delivering his keynote speech. – Bernama

Idris having a light moment with participants after delivering his keynote speech. – Bernama

Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh led a team of educators to Jakarta to share Malaysia’s success story in preparing graduates for the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

MALAYSIA hopes to attract 12,000 Indonesian students to the country next year.

“We hope to increase the number of students to between 11,000 and 12,000 in 2018,” he said after delivering his keynote speech at the “Preparing for the Future of Modern Education: Sharing Experiences from Malaysia” seminar in Jakarta, on Monday.

There are some 9,000 Indonesians currently studying in Malaysia, said Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh.

Many public and private tertiary institutions took the opportunity to set up booths that were well patronised by Indonesian educationists.

Many public and private tertiary institutions took the opportunity to set up booths that were well patronised by Indonesian educationists.

“Our main selling point is that we’re good, and we’re affordable. We must make it known that our universities are of quality, but our costs are only 30% of what you’d pay to go to a European university,” he said, adding that some Malaysian universities were better than their European counterparts.

Stressing that Malaysia would never compromise on the quality of its education, he said local institutions were closely monitored to ensure its quality.

“We don’t just want to attract students to come here and study. We also want to make sure that we’re giving them quality education.”

He said Malaysia and Indonesia have much to learn from each other.

Both nations, he said, have thousands of academicians who should be doing research together.

“There’s big potential for joint research.”

He said an integrated, and comprehensive response, was crucial for new age academia.

Education must evolve and become more flexible. Higher education institutions must redesign themselves to meet future demands.

“We shared with Indonesian school counsellors, local university representatives, and schools heads, on how we’ve successfully redesigned our education system in line with the 4th Industrial Revolution. Not only was the attendance good, but they were very interested in what we’ve done.”

Read more @ http://www.thestar.com.my/news/education/2017/10/08/promoting-malaysian-education/#A1yPxywJgqTUkRwO.99

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