Cleanliness and hygiene starts from home

If you have been taught at home and in schools on the need to keep the toilet clean after answering nature’s call, so that the next person who uses it does not complain, it will come naturally to you to ensure that the place remains hygienic. FILE PIC

IF you have been taught at home and in schools on the need to keep the toilet clean after answering nature’s call, so that the next person who uses it does not complain, it will come naturally to you to ensure that the place remains hygienic.

This “chain reaction” will continue as long as the previous person who uses the facility continues to keep it clean. It is the same for public places. It is everyone’s duty to keep public facilities clean and intact.

Unfortunately, this is easier said than done. On one hand, we have a group of civic-minded people, who would keep all things they use and eat clean; on the other, there are people who just do not care about hygiene. Maybe it is their upbringing, or that they were never taught the importance of cleanliness.

Recently, I went for a holiday to Melbourne, Australia. There, I noticed the streets and lanes are clean and there is ample garbage bins in public places.

In fact, the local council there provided different bins for different types of waste: for rubbish, other wastes and recyclable items. The bins are large, too.

In Malaysia, however, the bins are small and rubbish often overflows. Garbage trucks take too long to come and collect the food wastes and rubbish. As a result, we have scavengers tearing the bags and eating the garbage. The local authorities should provide bigger garbage bins.

The private sector can chip in by using the bins as advertisement spaces. They do that in other countries. The advertisement revenue can be used to employ workers, and get new garbage bins and trucks.

As for public toilets, some are voice operated, such as those I encountered in Melbourne.

For example, in one area, there are rows of toilet cubicles, each row has four to six cubicles.

The instructions on how to use them are labelled outside and inside the cubicle, and it works when the user touches a button or sensor on the panels. A voice would instruct the user on how to use the facility.

Each user is given 10 minutes in the cubicle. Once the door is closed, a soothing music plays in the background.

Once he has done his business, the unit will automatically trigger the flush system, just like toilets onboard an aircraft, except that this is fully automated

By LAU BING.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2017/12/314709/cleanliness-and-hygiene-starts-home

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