Don’t blame violence on video games

Video games are a source of relaxation and entertainment, and players get connected with a wide variety of people.

PUBG (PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds) has nothing to do with violence and terrorism. But violent video games involving shooting are very popular with teenagers.

There are many arguments on how video games influence teenagers to become aggressive.

Some people believe the terrorist attacks in Christchurch were caused by violence in video games. The reason is because the perpetrator, who live-streamed the mass shooting, filmed it in a way similar to a first-person shooter video game.

However, the relation between violent video games and acts of aggression is debatable.

Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman once said: “Even when there was no PUBG, violence still occurred. So do not be quick to blame it on one thing.”

But he was quick to point out that violence should be condemned by everyone because it contradicted the humanitarian principles steadfastly held by Malaysians and communities worldwide.

He said video games had nothing to do with the Christchurch violence and whether shooting games existed or not, some people would still be violent if they already held extremist views.

In my opinion, even if PUBG gets banned, players would find a way around to play it and fans would play other games with a similar shooting style.

Video games are a source of relaxation and entertainment, and players get connected with a wide variety of people.

I believe online games are not at fault.

Video games are part of e-sports and all players develop their skills from there.

by FATIN LIYANA.

Read more @ https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2019/07/500464/dont-blame-violence-video-games

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